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PuddinAndPeanuts

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I think I'm going to make some facial soaps: for 'mature skin' for me, anti acne for my daughter.

I plan on hot processing and I'm just kind of trying to work out how that works as it pertains to what I'm trying to do. The answer to my question may be just some good key phrases you think it would be beneficial for me to search here.

Here's what I need to know:

*The only oil I can add after gel phase with my additives is my superfat, correct?

*What % (if any) of my water can be added at this point?

*how long does hot process need to cure (for personal use, not sale)? From what I've read it's usable sooner, but I assume the advantages of a good cure on this are similar to cold process? So technically safe to use if no zap, but not gonna be good soap for a couple weeks to a month?

*did I read somewhere I can add botanicals this way and they won't brown, or was that just the acid talking?

*crockpot on low or high?

Thanks so much for any help you can give me
 

lsg

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Yes, the only oil you should add after the cook is the superfat oil. I would not add any water after the cook, unless your soap is too thick. The soap still needs to go through a cure stage, even though it is HP. If you use it right away, it won't last. You may get a vocanic mess if you turn the Crockpot on high. You might decorate the top of the bar with botanicals, but I don't think I would mix them into the soap. Even if they don't turn brown, they will be scratchy.
 

earlene

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I think I'm going to make some facial soaps: for 'mature skin' for me, anti acne for my daughter.

I plan on hot processing and I'm just kind of trying to work out how that works as it pertains to what I'm trying to do. The answer to my question may be just some good key phrases you think it would be beneficial for me to search here.

Here's what I need to know:

*The only oil I can add after gel phase with my additives is my superfat, correct?

*What % (if any) of my water can be added at this point?

*how long does hot process need to cure (for personal use, not sale)? From what I've read it's usable sooner, but I assume the advantages of a good cure on this are similar to cold process? So technically safe to use if no zap, but not gonna be good soap for a couple weeks to a month?

*did I read somewhere I can add botanicals this way and they won't brown, or was that just the acid talking?
I agree with lsg, but thought I'd include a bit of personal experience with some botanicals I've added to HP soap.

I have added Lavendar buds to HP soap and I can assure you they DO turn a rusty looking brown. I have added chamomile flowers to HP & yes, they turned brown, too, plus became scratchy as the soap cured. Same is true for tea leaves, but they weren't pretty to start with, but OH, so very scratchy!

That's about it for botanicals I've used in HP soap. I switched to CP when the weather got warmer, and now only do HP occasionally.

Cure time is really no different, no matter what you read or hear out there. I thought the same thing when I first started because there is so much misinformation out there. A longer cure makes better, milder and longer lasting soap.

One caution I'd like to make is to look into what you need for DOS prevention. Purchasing ROE (rosemary oleoresin) at the very least, is a really good idea. There are other additives as well, but I'd suggest starting with ROE. You can order it online from soap suppliers (or Amazon, etc.)
 

DeeAnna

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The botanicals that people seem to get good results from using are colloidal/baby oatmeal and possibly calendula petals. Some people use poppy seeds or ground coffee, but they're scratchy unless ground finely.

Even though it's true you can stir in additives after HP soap is fully saponified, remember even fully saponified and cured soap is still alkaline, whether HP or CP. The alkaline (high pH) nature of soap will affect some ingredients.
 

PuddinAndPeanuts

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I agree with lsg, but thought I'd include a bit of personal experience with some botanicals I've added to HP soap.

I have added Lavendar buds to HP soap and I can assure you they DO turn a rusty looking brown. I have added chamomile flowers to HP & yes, they turned brown, too, plus became scratchy as the soap cured. Same is true for tea leaves, but they weren't pretty to start with, but OH, so very scratchy!

That's about it for botanicals I've used in HP soap. I switched to CP when the weather got warmer, and now only do HP occasionally.

Cure time is really no different, no matter what you read or hear out there. I thought the same thing when I first started because there is so much misinformation out there. A longer cure makes better, milder and longer lasting soap.

One caution I'd like to make is to look into what you need for DOS prevention. Purchasing ROE (rosemary oleoresin) at the very least, is a really good idea. There are other additives as well, but I'd suggest starting with ROE. You can order it online from soap suppliers (or Amazon, etc.)

Thank u! I already use ROE in my body butter. Good stuff.

Thanks all- I appreciate the help
 
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