honey oat milk soap ricing edition

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cece_em

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I have made a few batches of honey oat milk soap, cold process. last night, i made 2 1-kilo batches testing a new fragrance oil. The first batch didn't have much of a problem that i didn't antipicate. The second batch was a different story. Both batches have almost the same ingredients, except that put in canola oil and olive oil pomace a few grams more compared to the first batch, and the second batch didn't have sunflower oil. here's the recipe:

Canola oil 118 grams
Castor 50 grams
Cocoa butter 50 grams
Coconut oil, 76 degress 350 grams
Olive oil pomace 206 grams
Shea butter 50 grams
Sunflower oil 136 grams
Rice bran oil 50 grams
Lye 140.18 grams
Water 260 grams
Milk 70 grams (slushy)
Honey 2 tsp, diluted in a little bit of extra water (refrigerated)
Fragrance oil 35 grams
Oats 2 tbsp, ground

I let the lye-water solution cool down to room temperature before i added it in my oils.

So, it separated and riced on me while still in the mixing bowl a few moments after i dumped the f.o. no, i didn't use stick blender because the batter has a tendency to get to thick trace almost immediately.

The last photo, the one darker in color, is immediately after i had rebatched a portion of the riced batch. I rebatched this just today.

How long do i need to cure this rebatched soap? And, i am open to suggestion on how to improve my recipe.

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galaxyMLP

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I would let the soap cure as long as you would have with cp. Even though it may be safe and not lye heavy it will still benefit by curing to dry out some. If you added even more water then you most likely need a longer cure time.

When the batter rices, you can often times beat it back into submission by stick blending. Even if the batter becomes very thick, you can just glop it into the mold when you have everything incorporated. You won't be able to do swirls or anything fancy but then you wont have to rebatch it

Eta: also, that is a lot of a variety of oils. That's 8 oils in one recipe! Is there a reason you're using so many different ones?
 
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Susie

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Is that the recipe for the first batch or the second one? It needs to cure the same 4-6 weeks as CP. And I agree with galaxyMLP, why so many oils?
 

Lion Of Judah

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.... "on ricing" >>> "This is generally a fragrance oil problem. Not all fragrances are tested and appropriate for use in cold process soap. Be sure to get your fragrances from a supplier that assures they will work for you because they have tested them. Most essential oils will not pose this problem. The exception would be clove essential oil which will accelerate trace. Some fragrance oils that qualify as being "okay" might still accelerate trace and you can often alleviate some of those issues by increasing the amount of water in your recipe to the higher range of what is recommended." ... taken from : http://millersoap.com/trouble.html

i myself uses about 5-8 different type of oils in my soap recipes , i do not think it's a bad thing.

 

Lion Of Judah

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p.s .... you can grate your soap the day after you made it and rebatch , you do not have to wait for it to cure to rebatch . if you feel it is caustic then be sure to wear gloves.

> * OHM is the soap i am working on this morning surprisingly :) and i too have 8 oils in my recipe
 

cece_em

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I love to experiment with different oils and butters that's why. The photos are from the second batch :) and i didnt add water because the soap was still very moist, it melted quite quickly using the double boiler method.

Thank you for the feedback and advice.
 

lionprincess00

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Recipe suggestions (since you got some fo advice already)...
Too much coconut for my and most tastes. some will like it at 35% which you're about at, but most stick to 20%. The bubbles will go down, but you can make it up with creamy lather.
Deeanna, our go to scientist, taught me and others this.
Take the hardness number (yours in this case is 40, subtract the cleansing number, yours is 23, and this is your "sustainability number". In other words, it helps you see how long lasting your soap is. With such high soft oils and no Palm/lard/Tallow, it is sitting at a 17 right now, meaning it'll wear away faster. I keep my hard minus cleansing number at a 25-30 if I can.
Your soft oils of sunflower and canola, but especially the sunflower, have a very short shelf life (sunflower is 6 month I believe), and having 25% between the two may cause dos problems. Many love using canola and such, and many stick to using sunflower in lotions. If you're wanting to try butters, I'd recommend
Keep co at 20%
Split the soft oils between rice bran (longer shelf life) and your olive pomace.
Cocoa at 5-8%
Shea at 5-8%
35-45% or thereabouts a hard oil like Palm, tallow, or lard.
Edit, and yes, castor at 5% to help sustain lather
I didn't give an exact recipe because it looks like you enjoy mixing and matching, and you weren't really asking for recipes, but rather opinions:)
 
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ngian

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Deeanna, our go to scientist, taught me and others this.
Take the hardness number (yours in this case is 40, subtract the cleansing number, yours is 23, and this is your "sustainability number". In other words, it helps you see how long lasting your soap is. With such high soft oils and no Palm/lard/Tallow, it is sitting at a 17 right now, meaning it'll wear away faster. I keep my hard minus cleansing number at a 25-30 if I can.
Very interesting tip! Do you have a link on this advice? I tried searching the above without any luck. I just wanted to read the whole conversation in case there is more valuable info on these numbers.
 

cece_em

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Recipe suggestions (since you got some fo advice already)...
Too much coconut for my and most tastes. some will like it at 35% which you're about at, but most stick to 20%. The bubbles will go down, but you can make it up with creamy lather.
Deeanna, our go to scientist, taught me and others this.
Take the hardness number (yours in this case is 40, subtract the cleansing number, yours is 23, and this is your "sustainability number". In other words, it helps you see how long lasting your soap is. With such high soft oils and no Palm/lard/Tallow, it is sitting at a 17 right now, meaning it'll wear away faster. I keep my hard minus cleansing number at a 25-30 if I can.
Your soft oils of sunflower and canola, but especially the sunflower, have a very short shelf life (sunflower is 6 month I believe), and having 25% between the two may cause dos problems. Many love using canola and such, and many stick to using sunflower in lotions. If you're wanting to try butters, I'd recommend
Keep co at 20%
Split the soft oils between rice bran (longer shelf life) and your olive pomace.
Cocoa at 5-8%
Shea at 5-8%
35-45% or thereabouts a hard oil like Palm, tallow, or lard.
Edit, and yes, castor at 5% to help sustain lather
I didn't give an exact recipe because it looks like you enjoy mixing and matching, and you weren't really asking for recipes, but rather opinions:)
This is a must try! Thank you!
 

lsg

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I had to recently rebatch cp soap made with Oatmeal, Milk and Honey because it had pockets of liquid when unmolded. I slapped it all in an old crockpot and cooked it. It turned out well. As stated above, let it cure as with cp soap.
 
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