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Louis mercy

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Please guys I need your help.
I recently made soap with pko , soyabean oil and ghee.
For the first time and noticed white casts like glucose powder on the surface of the bars.
Any ideas what this could be or why it's happening to the Soap.
Should I be worried
IL post pic of the soap soon.
Pls helppp😰🤧🤧🤧16108950509112687928337177689171.jpg

Anyone with some answers
 

linne1gi

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Please guys I need your help.
I recently made soap with pko , soyabean oil and ghee.
For the first time and noticed white casts like glucose powder on the surface of the bars.
Any ideas what this could be or why it's happening to the Soap.
Should I be worried
IL post pic of the soap soon.
Pls helppp😰🤧🤧🤧View attachment 53309

Anyone with some answers
Soda ash, also known as sodium carbonate. You can just rinse it off. To prevent it, cover your soap for up to 48 hours until it has fully saponified. Soda ash happens when the unreacted lye in your soap batter, reacts with the carbon dioxide in the air. It’s not harmful, just not pretty.
 

Louis mercy

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Soda ash, also known as sodium carbonate. You can just rinse it off. To prevent it, cover your soap for up to 48 hours until it has fully saponified. Soda ash happens when the unreacted lye in your soap batter, reacts with the carbon dioxide in the air. It’s not harmful, just not pretty.
Ooh tnx for your response maim really do appreciate it.
It's been sitting for about 5days now on thetray Is it okay to still rinse it off and cover it or what do I do about it now
 

cmzaha

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I posted in your tamarind thread, everyone answered your question here, but I will also mention what I mentioned in your other thread. Do Not use milk butter in soap it Stinks. The butyric acid in milk butter causes the soap to smell like vomit, to put it bluntly. Most soapmakers starting out do not even think about using table butter or ghee and I wish they would delete it from the soap calculators. It just causes folks to waste soap.
 

stanekster

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As mentioned above, it is soda ash. A few tips were mentioned above. Some others that worked for me:
  • Looks like you used molds- leave the soap to cure in molds longer...then the ash will not appear since the saponification process will be further on. That way 5 sides should be ash free.
  • The ash on the top can be prevented by putting a thin layer of plastic over the top for the first 24 hours. I used clear poly film on my molds.
  • When washing it off, use a drying rack so that your soaps are not sitting in a puddle of water.
  • Check the soaps on the rack after a bit to see if the rack is leaving indentations in soap...if so, rub two pieces of soap together to smooth out indentations....then place back on rack on a different side.
hope that helps!
 

ShaunaD

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I have less soda ash i use a water discount... or it worked on a recipe I retried after getting heaps of ash, made the next batch with 15% water discount and it didn’t happen. It could have been a fluke though :)
 

DeeAnna

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@ShaunaD -- Unfortunately water discount does not have a single accepted definition -- it means something different to different people.

If you want to explain what you did in a way that everyone can understand, tell us the lye concentration or water:lye ratio you used. These terms both mean the same thing, and both will be 100% clear to everyone.

You're right on this point -- reducing the amount of water in the batch does tend to reduce ash for most people.
 

linne1gi

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@ShaunaD -- Unfortunately water discount does not have a single accepted definition -- it means something different to different people.

If you want to explain what you did in a way that everyone can understand, tell us the lye concentration or water:lye ratio you used. These terms both mean the same thing, and both will be 100% clear to everyone.

You're right on this point -- reducing the amount of water in the batch does tend to reduce ash for most people.
You are absolutely right. So many people tell me, "I used a 10% water discount", and I'm always thinking 10% of what? I wish soapcalc would get rid of that 38% water as a percent of oils - it means nothing! And so many people don't even know they can change these numbers. Okay, I'll get off my soap box now (pun intended).
 

ShaunaD

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You are absolutely right. So many people tell me, "I used a 10% water discount", and I'm always thinking 10% of what? I wish soapcalc would get rid of that 38% water as a percent of oils - it means nothing! And so many people don't even know they can change these numbers. Okay, I'll get off my soap box now (pun intended).
I need to learn about the lye concentration and ratios now too as I only understand that i have more success if i change the lye calculator water recommendation by a percent... I’m on this forum to learn so hopefully it all makes sense soon. When I first looked at making soap I put it aside when I saw all the calculation descriptions! So glad I revisited!!!
 
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