Help needed please. Preservative question in scrubs.

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nourishbay

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I am making a sugar scrub and I want to put in preservative. The one I am using is phenoxyethanol. My recipe is a percentage of oils and a percentage of sugar mixed. I know preservative is used at 1%. So my question: is it 1% of the liquid oils or 1% of everything including the sugar? The Sugar is a dry ingredient so not sure if I should include it? Thanks
 

atiz

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I am making a sugar scrub and I want to put in preservative. The one I am using is phenoxyethanol. My recipe is a percentage of oils and a percentage of sugar mixed. I know preservative is used at 1%. So my question: is it 1% of the liquid oils or 1% of everything including the sugar? The Sugar is a dry ingredient so not sure if I should include it? Thanks
You would want to use 1% of your total batch weight (including the sugar).

If your scrub is oil-based, and you are not planning to get it wet with your fingers, you may not need a preservative. But if you do use one, I would probably use a broad-spectrum one (phenoxyethanol is not one of those).
 

Megan

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I am also trying phenoxyethanol in my formula. No, it's not broad spectrum...but people still use it often in these types of products. From what I understand, the high concentration of sugar also helps to preserve the formulation if water introduction is kept to a minimum.
 

shunt2011

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I use 1% of the entire batch. Sugar is the food that feeds molds etc. especially once exposed to water. I use Phenonip correction I use Germall. I just had to go and look at my recipe and notes. It's phenonip that doesn't work well with Polysorbates. I tired Optiphen but had problems with it clumping in my mix regardless of the temp.
 
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nourishbay

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I read it is broad. Here is the snippet. Phenoxyethanol is incredibly versatile: It works in a large range of formulas and pH ranges, has broad spectrum activity against many pathogens you don't want multiplying in your skincare products, is stable, and is compatible with many other preservatives used in cosmetics.


So what preservative do you use for coconut oil and shea butter based sugar scrubs. Because people keep it in the bathroom and dip wet fingers in.
 

Megan

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I read it is broad. Here is the snippet. Phenoxyethanol is incredibly versatile: It works in a large range of formulas and pH ranges, has broad spectrum activity against many pathogens you don't want multiplying in your skincare products, is stable, and is compatible with many other preservatives used in cosmetics.


So what preservative do you use for coconut oil and shea butter based sugar scrubs. Because people keep it in the bathroom and dip wet fingers in.
Phenoxyethanol has little activity against mold. I know some people use Optiphen plus because of sorbic acid....there are others though. I still maintain that if you keep water contamination to a minimum, sugar used at around 60% is a good preservative. Sugar can absorb a ton of water, leaving it unavailable for microbes. You don't want to leave a pool of water on top of your scrub, but the miniscule introduction from wet fingers once or twice during each use should not be an issue.
 

atiz

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I agree with @Megan, if it is for yourself and know how to be careful.
If you give it away or sell, I would use Liquid germall plus or something similar.
 

amd

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I still maintain that if you keep water contamination to a minimum, sugar used at around 60% is a good preservative. Sugar can absorb a ton of water, leaving it unavailable for microbes. You don't want to leave a pool of water on top of your scrub, but the miniscule introduction from wet fingers once or twice during each use should not be an issue.
The chemist I share an office with has told me that sugar as a preservative only works with food based products - such as jams or salt for curing meat, etc. - and does not apply to the world of cosmetics. Any introduction of water is a risk for mold and/or bacteria contamination.

That said, I use Germall for my emulsified oil scrubs. I saw a table (and I should have saved the link) that very clearly explained the advantages of different preservatives. Germall, although it is a bit picky about temperature, seemed to cover the majority of situations.
 

cmzaha

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@shunt2011 I just posted this in another thread. Where did you read about Optiphen being inactivated or unstable with Polysorbates? I have only read about Phenonip becoming inactivated or possibly inactivated with polysorbates. One problem with using it in sugar scrubs or lotions it is not good against mold, fungi or yeast. It is also better in products that contain water. But it does look like Optiphen ND can be used but still may not be a great pick.
Here is a link to one site I like
Preservative Reviews
 
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nourishbay

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The chemist I share an office with has told me that sugar as a preservative only works with food based products - such as jams or salt for curing meat, etc. - and does not apply to the world of cosmetics. Any introduction of water is a risk for mold and/or bacteria contamination.

That said, I use Germall for my emulsified oil scrubs. I saw a table (and I should have saved the link) that very clearly explained the advantages of different preservatives. Germall, although it is a bit picky about temperature, seemed to cover the majority of situations.
Please send the link. Thanks. Mine us emulsified too
 

nourishbay

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So for you guys thst make emulsified scrubs Gremall is the way to go? This is for UK purchase. Please send link to a reputable buyer you have used. Thanks
 

nourishbay

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I use 1% of the entire batch. Sugar is the food that feeds molds etc. especially once exposed to water. I use Phenonip correction I use Germall. I just had to go and look at my recipe and notes. It's phenonip that doesn't work well with Polysorbates. I tired Optiphen but had problems with it clumping in my mix regardless of the temp.
You use at 1% of total mix?
 

Megan

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The chemist I share an office with has told me that sugar as a preservative only works with food based products - such as jams or salt for curing meat, etc. - and does not apply to the world of cosmetics. Any introduction of water is a risk for mold and/or bacteria contamination.

That said, I use Germall for my emulsified oil scrubs. I saw a table (and I should have saved the link) that very clearly explained the advantages of different preservatives. Germall, although it is a bit picky about temperature, seemed to cover the majority of situations.
Good to know. I always use a preservative but I thought that might help at least a bit.
 

LilyJo

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Is the for personal use or are you planning on selling?

Don't forget rules on ingredients and max %ages are very different in the US to the EU. If you are thinking of selling you would need to check EU approved preservatives and usage rates- your assessor can help too.

But if it's just for personal use, you can use whatever you want but just be careful.
 

nourishbay

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Is the for personal use or are you planning on selling?

Don't forget rules on ingredients and max %ages are very different in the US to the EU. If you are thinking of selling you would need to check EU approved preservatives and usage rates- your assessor can help too.

But if it's just for personal use, you can use whatever you want but just be careful.
For selling
 

amd

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Please send the link.
I think this was the source I referenced. As I said originally, I did not save the link, but this looks familiar...
 

atiz

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But I guess if selling in the UK the EU rules may not apply any more :/

For selling, I would definitely use a broad-spectrum preservative. I have used Liquid Germall Plus in emulsified sugar scrub and it worked fine, I had mine in the shower for like 6 months.

I also find this helpful when I just quickly want to look up something.
 

nourishbay

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Thanks all and for the links. One of the articles say Liquid germall plus in EU is to to be used in creams and lotions. My question is can I use it I. Sugar scrubs as the will be washed off? Also max usage is at. 5% not 1% like the others
 

amd

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One of the articles say Liquid germall plus in EU is to to be used in creams and lotions. My question is can I use it I. Sugar scrubs as the will be washed off?
Sugar scrub is not a cream or a lotion, so you should be fine to use it.
 
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