goats milk soap

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jwquam

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I made my first batch of soap last week with Goats milk. I froze the milk (slushy) and added the lye. My soap turned out brown and not the best smelling. Could the goats milk have been bad?
 

Sunny

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No, the lye burned your goats' milk.. BUT if you wait, and let the soap cure for at least a month, that nasty smell will fade away. I had the same thing happen to me. :) hope this helps.
 

IrishLass

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I do the half and half method that Andee mentioned when making my milk soaps. It works great- no fuss, no muss, and my milk soaps never go tan or brown or stinky.

You can even use this same method to make 100% milk soaps by adding enough powdered milk to the milk half so that your entire liquid amount is essentially a 100% milk concentration.


As for the stinky soap you now have on hand, let it sit for awhile like Tasha said. Although the brown color will pretty much remain, the stinky ammonia smell will cure completely out over the next few weeks.



IrishLass :)
 

bodybym

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I use fully frozen GM and I also freeze my mold before I make the soap, pour the soap in and put it back in the freezer. Comes out creamy looking every time.
 

holly99

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I do the half and half method as well. It's great!
 

kommon_sense

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If you use powdered goats milk, can you make your normal lye-water mixture and just add in the goats milk powder at thin trace?

*OR*

Should you make milk with the goats milk powder/water and from there use it as though it was normal liquid goats milk?
 

Andee

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kommon_sense said:
If you use powdered goats milk, can you make your normal lye-water mixture and just add in the goats milk powder at thin trace?

*OR*

Should you make milk with the goats milk powder/water and from there use it as though it was normal liquid goats milk?

You can mix it and use it just like normal goats milk, or you can take a small amount of your water and make a barely fluid paste to be added as you reach about halfway through your mixing process. Add the goat's milk powder at that time. This method will prevent clumps and burning.

Hope this helps!
 

soapsmurf

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What happens if one adds liquid goats milk to the warmed oils and not the lye solution?
 

Bukawww

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I am definitely trying this method out this weekend. I wasted enough lye and goatsmilk for a 77 oz of oils batch :( ...I put my goatsmilk in solid frozen and the lye never heated it all up enough to thaw...and then over time, the milk curdled from being left out so long.

And although I have frozen my molds and RT soaped, AND put everything back in the freezer afterwards, I still always get a partial gel which is not my favorite (for milk soaps only). I like 3" round OMH soap so I use a PVC pipe...I'm sure thats what is causing the gel even in the freezer...so I guess I just won't fight the gel and refridgerate everything instead.
 

Sunny

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I'd love to try this too, with powdered goats milk and regular goats milk to make the 100% milk.

But does powdered goats milk have the same properties in soap as fresh? People loooove goats milk soap but I wonder if powdered would feel the same.
 

Andee

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soapsmurf said:
What happens if one adds liquid goats milk to the warmed oils and not the lye solution?

You can do it that way. I don't use that method because I want to keep the sugars of the milk from cooking and reducing the time it is heated helps.



tasha said:
I'd love to try this too, with powdered goats milk and regular goats milk to make the 100% milk.

But does powdered goats milk have the same properties in soap as fresh? People loooove goats milk soap but I wonder if powdered would feel the same.

I've had "goat milk soap" snobs not be able to tell the difference between fresh and powdered. There is a gal in my area that makes both and nobody can tell the difference once the soaps are finished. Just make sure the goat's milk powder is not grainy.
 

soapsmurf

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Andee said:
soapsmurf said:
What happens if one adds liquid goats milk to the warmed oils and not the lye solution?

You can do it that way. I don't use that method because I want to keep the sugars of the milk from cooking and reducing the time it is heated helps.
So not a no-no? I've down it that way before while keeping everything at low temps. No scorching or other mishaps. :)
 

IrishLass

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soapsmurf said:
What happens if one adds liquid goats milk to the warmed oils and not the lye solution?


I've done it this way with great results- even heating the milk in with my oils up to 130 degreesF in some of my batches. They came out fine and a nice off-white creamy color.

Re: powdered GM- I cannot tell the difference between it and regular liquid GM in my soaps. They both feel exactly the same to me- nice and creamy.


IrishLass :)
 

Soapmaker Man

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Starting with my master-batched recipe and 50% lye solution mix, all at room temperature, I wait to add my GM/CM slurry until light trace. This way, the lye and oils are starting to saponify and there is less active lye; it has been neutralized partially by the fats, thus, less chance of burning the milk or milk powders. I get only off white soaps using this method.

Paul :wink:
 

Andee

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soapsmurf said:
Andee said:
soapsmurf said:
What happens if one adds liquid goats milk to the warmed oils and not the lye solution?

You can do it that way. I don't use that method because I want to keep the sugars of the milk from cooking and reducing the time it is heated helps.
So not a no-no? I've down it that way before while keeping everything at low temps. No scorching or other mishaps. :)

You can do it that way. I don't because I've not had good success with that method, but as you can see others have great success.
 

soapsmurf

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IrishLass said:
soapsmurf said:
What happens if one adds liquid goats milk to the warmed oils and not the lye solution?


I've done it this way with great results- even heating the milk in with my oils up to 130 degreesF in some of my batches. They came out fine and a nice off-white creamy color.

Re: powdered GM- I cannot tell the difference between it and regular liquid GM in my soaps. They both feel exactly the same to me- nice and creamy.


IrishLass :)
I made a batch keeping the temps of everything close to 80F with no problems. I would love to try powdered goats milk, but what's a good source?
 

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