Goat milk soap question

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kirvil

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I made goat milk CP soap for the first time in several years using a different method. I bought evaporated canned goat milk, diluted it, and froze it in cubes. Then I weighed the cubes for the liquid portion and added the lye crystals to it. It took quite a while for the lye to melt the frozen goat milk, and then a lot of stirring to get the lye (flake kind from Brambleberry) to dissolve. Then I let the lye solution sit while I measured out my oils. When I was ready to add the lye solution, it had turned into a thick cake batter consistency, kind of like the lye had reacted with the fat in the goat milk. I went ahead and scraped the lye mixture into the oils, stick blended it to trace, and poured the soap in the mold. My question is ---has anyone had goat milk react to lye in this way?
 

Obsidian

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Yes, any time you mix lye with a liquid that contains fat, it will start to saponify if it sits for awhile. Its still fine to use but if you don't want it to happen again, use the split method. Half your liquid amount is water, dissolve your lye in this, the other half is your milk and this can be mixed into your warm oils before adding the lye solution.
 

kirvil

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Thanks. That makes sense. Do you use any less of a superfat to compensate for the fat in the goat milk? I used a 6% superfat.
 

Obsidian

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I don't adjust SF for animal milks, you would for heavy cream or coconut cream.
 

paillo

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Coincidental timing, I had this happen yesterday, for the first time ever with a simple milk recipe, using coconut milk. By the time my lye solution had cooled down it was the consistency of thick Greek yogurt. Hmmmmm. Well, I had let my mix of coconut milk, distilled water, silk, sugar and clay sit out on the counter for a day, and it was warm out, probably it fermented before I added the lye. Never again will I do that.

Not at all pourable, so spatula'd it in and soaped it anyway, and it seems fine, no fermented smell, no discoloration. Will see how it cures. I'm no chemist at all, so can't guess at what happened. If it's fine I could try with cottage cheese. Just kidding, hee hee :)
 

Deedles

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I made goat milk CP soap for the first time in several years using a different method. I bought evaporated canned goat milk, diluted it, and froze it in cubes. Then I weighed the cubes for the liquid portion and added the lye crystals to it. It took quite a while for the lye to melt the frozen goat milk, and then a lot of stirring to get the lye (flake kind from Brambleberry) to dissolve. Then I let the lye solution sit while I measured out my oils. When I was ready to add the lye solution, it had turned into a thick cake batter consistency, kind of like the lye had reacted with the fat in the goat milk. I went ahead and scraped the lye mixture into the oils, stick blended it to trace, and poured the soap in the mold. My question is ---has anyone had goat milk react to lye in this way?
My last batch of GM soap was made with evaporated canned milk. I ran out of what I usually use and had to use what I could find at our little local store. The first difference I noticed as I mixed in the lye was the color, it was a much darker golden yellow. By the time the lye was dissolved it was very thick, like the cake batter you mentioned. My oils were already melted and cooled so I didn't have to wait to mix. It mixed well into the oils and at 2 weeks it lathers like the others so I'm hoping it will work out as well.
 

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