Glycerine Rivers

Discussion in 'Beginners Soap Making Forum' started by EllieMae, Dec 5, 2019.

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  1. Dec 9, 2019 #21

    EllieMae

    EllieMae

    EllieMae

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    @SideDoorSoaps - these are the two batches that I've had rivers with so far. The purple, yellow and white one used TD so perhaps that's why it's so pronounced. The charcoal soap definitely has rivers too but less noticeable.

    You all have influenced me into liking the rivers now! But I attempted another batch last night trying specifically to avoid rivers and prevent gel. Will have to wait and see how it turns out!

    river2.jpg river1.jpg
     
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  2. Dec 9, 2019 #22

    KiwiMoose

    KiwiMoose

    KiwiMoose

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    If people ask what they are, you can tell them it's the natural glycerin that the soap produces. It's very good for the skin as a humectant that attracts moisture to keep the skin soft.
     
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  3. Dec 10, 2019 #23

    SideDoorSoaps

    SideDoorSoaps

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    They are beautiful!!
     
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  4. Dec 10, 2019 #24

    DeeAnna

    DeeAnna

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    Except rivers are not glycerin ... they're made entirely of soap.

    What could be said about "rivers" is they're a sign the soap does not contain a high % of non-soap fillers. If you don't count the cost of fragrance, the most expensive part of soap is the pure soap itself. Less scrupulous soap makers did and still do load up their soap with inexpensive fillers. This reduces the cost per bar and thus the seller makes more profit.

    Rivers don't form as easily when the soap is full of non-soap fillers, so some of the old makers used to intentionally make "figged" soap (figging is the old name for what we call "rivers") and use this as a way to tout the purity of their soap.
     

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