GLDA, a modern alternative to EDTA

Discussion in 'Lye-Based Soap Forum' started by SaltedFig, Mar 5, 2019.

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  1. Oct 14, 2019 #41

    cmzaha

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    I do not remember the percentages I was using, but what I started with did not help but did not form crystals on the outside of the soap, when I upped the percentage the crystals formed. DeeAnna and I realized it was the Citric Acid causing it, so I changed to Tetrasodium EDTA which stoped the crystals and helped with the soap scum. I also masterbatched up my citric acid solution.
     
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  2. Nov 5, 2019 #42

    steffamarie

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    Just ran out of EDTA so I ordered some GLDA from Essential Wholesale. On their website, they mention a 0.5% - 10% usage range, just wondered if anyone had any insight on what would be the best usage rate for it as a chelator? I used EDTA at 0.5% of batch weight. I am thinking of trying it at 1% since it seems it may be slightly less effective than EDTA.
     
  3. Nov 11, 2019 #43

    CatahoulaBubble

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    This is interesting but to be honest I didn't even know EDTA existed until today. I learned soap making from my grandmother and honed it by experimenting with different oils once I discovered soap calc. I've never added EDTA to my soap and I've never had DOS even after 3 years of storage.
     
  4. Nov 17, 2019 #44

    Mobjack Bay

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    Has anyone heard of or tried Trilon M as a chelator? The chemical name is methylglycinediacetic acid (MGDA)*. Apparently, Trilon M was the first product to meet the US EPA’s Design for Environment criteria for chelating and sequestering agents (in 2011). There’s an old press release about it here, and links for technical info and msds are provided at a supplier site called Saveoncitric. It’s pricey for a 10 lb bag. https://www.saveoncitric.com/trmpo10lb.html According to what I read, it works well at high pH, has low toxicity to aquatic organisms and is biodegradable.
     
  5. Dec 2, 2019 #45

    penelopejane

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    EDTA also makes soap hard and gives it a "strange" (to me) feel - sort of plasticy.
     
  6. Dec 2, 2019 #46

    sabina iyer

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    Hi All,
    I have been hunting all over internet last week for a soap recipe that lathers well in hard water. I found that EDTA or sodium gluconate would help to increase the lather. Now today i can across a new one called sodium cocoyl isetheoniate powder. Looks like this it helps lather even in hard water. Have any of you used it and compare which one is better
     
  7. Dec 2, 2019 #47

    lsg

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    SCI is a surfactant. I use it in shampoo and other B&B products.
     
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  8. Dec 2, 2019 #48

    DeeAnna

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    SCI (sodium cocoyl isetheoniate) is a synthetic detergent (surfactant), not a chelator. You can't directly compare a syndet with a chelator because they don't function the same way.

    By adding SCI to soap, you're making a "combo bar" which is a mixture of soap and non-soap detergents. Sure, a combo bar might lather better in hard water, but only because the SCI is not affected by hard water. It's not that you're helping the soap to lather better.
     
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  9. Dec 2, 2019 #49

    sabina iyer

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    Thanks for pointing the difference. I guess it is better not to use SCI in my soaps as it would strip off oils and would be drying for skin. I would stick to chelator
     
  10. Dec 2, 2019 #50

    DeeAnna

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    SCI is a good synthetic detergent in that it is reasonably mild on the skin and has decent lather. Study up on its properties and you'll learn that for yourself.

    The issues with SCI is that it is not lye-based soap, which is the main interest of most of us. And SCI is not a chelator, if you want to use a chelator to lengthen shelf life and reduce soap scum. Chelators are the topic of discussion in this thread -- we aren't discussing surfactants.

    If you would like to discuss the benefits of adding SCI or other syndets to soap, you might get more responses and better ideas if you start your own new thread on that topic.
     
  11. Dec 3, 2019 at 11:30 AM #51

    sabina iyer

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    Thanks for the info. I was under the impression that a chelator would add up the lather and SCI would double up as chelator and surfactant.
     
  12. Dec 3, 2019 at 1:52 PM #52

    DeeAnna

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    SCI is only a synthetic detergent. It is not a chelator. I'd like to read the source that says it's a chelator -- do you have a reference so I can look that up?
     
  13. Dec 7, 2019 at 2:05 AM #53

    Mobjack Bay

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    Bumping this one. Has anyone heard of MGDA/Trilon M?
     
  14. Dec 7, 2019 at 9:35 AM #54

    Michele50

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    I've copied/pasted part of a PDF from https://chelates.nouryon.com/siteassets/Brochure-dissolvine-gl-technical-brochure.pdf
    This 14 or so page PDF contains a bunch of info about GLDA. I'm thinking that what I highlighted in yellow IS speaking about GLDA and it states something about rancidity which causes DOS. I've provided the link to the site and you'll find the info below on page 12.

    upload_2019-12-7_3-26-53.png
     
  15. Dec 7, 2019 at 1:39 PM #55

    DeeAnna

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    The entire passage you show are valid descriptions of what any chelator does. Irish Lass uses EDTA in her lotions to reinforce her preservative due to EDTAs action on killing bacteria (the last part of the passage refers to this.)

    What Earlene is wondering is whether there is a specific, positive interaction between GLDA and the antioxidant ROE. She's referring to the tests Dunn did to see which pairings of various chelators and antioxidants were the most effective. He didn't look at GLDA in his experiments.

    Speaking from memory, he looked at the various combinations of the antioxidants ROE and BHT paired with the chelators EDTA and citrate. Some pairings didn't perform any better than using just one chemical alone; other pairings performed markedly better.
     

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