Frustration at other businesses

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BWsoaps

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You're all a bit deluded when it comes to expressing NATURAL.

None of what I use is synthetic.

I legally have the power to call it natural.

It is legally natural.

Chill

I'm not tomahawk (my new nickname for ToMH), but if you cook an animal over a fire pit and then some rain seeps in the ashes making a potash which then mixes with the fat to make a soap - then yes, THAT soap might be considered natural. Although, as the cooking etc was performed by someone, it is arguable still not natural.

Now, if someone is selling soap made when lightning hits a tree, which catches fire and falls on a wild pig.............


Mate what you are describing is a natural formation.

If you used this rule in life then NOTHING would be natural.

Stand back and look what your saying.

That's like saying if you shoot a pig and cook it and eat it, it's not natural because the bullet is man made.

I feel like a child having this convo with grown adults.

It's natural full stop

Leave it, go home
 

IrishLass

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You're all a bit deluded when it comes to expressing NATURAL.

None of what I use is synthetic.

I legally have the power to call it natural.

It is legally natural.

Chill


Can you elaborate as to what you define as being synthetic/non-synthetic, and/or explain how none of what you use is synthetic?

"Legally" natural is one thing, but "realistically" natural is another.


IrishLass :)
 

penelopejane

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IL the British (and I guess others) get away with saying soap is natural because they list end product ingredients. There is no lye (definitely a chemical) in their soap because it has saponified and is no longer present in the soap.

Some people think this is because the company didn't use lye so if the public just look at labels to compare they will go for the "natural" one.
 
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I'm not tomahawk (my new nickname for ToMH), but if you cook an animal over a fire pit and then some rain seeps in the ashes making a potash which then mixes with the fat to make a soap - then yes, THAT soap might be considered natural. Although, as the cooking etc was performed by someone, it is arguable still not natural.

Now, if someone is selling soap made when lightning hits a tree, which catches fire and falls on a wild pig.............

The only 100% natural soap I know about is THIS (but I ain't washing with it!):

ETA: That Sir Thomas Browne sure had a way with words!!

Holy crud! The next time I visit family & friends, I gotta visit the Soap Lady, too! As a native Philadelphian, WHY DIDN'T I KNOW THAT?

image.jpg
 
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SplendorSoaps

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Hot topic today!

I tell my customers that ask it is all natural that it is as natural as I can get it.

Exactly this. I do some soaps with FOs, and some with EOs. For customers who are looking for a more natural alternative to commercial soaps, I sometimes jokingly tell them that the only way this bar could be more natural is if I harvested the lye out of ashes myself! LOL

While I agree with those on this thread who have pointed out that soap is not, by definition, "all natural," I think that the semantics are sometimes lost on the consumers who are just looking for a soap that's closer to the ingredients in their natural state than say, a bottle of body wash. Yes, sodium hydroxide is a chemical. But when I explain to my customers that my soap is made by adding fats to lye and then adding either a synthetic FO or a plant-derived EO for scent, many view the process as more wholesome and pure than the mass manufactured products that use SLS and SLES.

I'm not advocating misleading the customer or being irresponsible with the term "natural," but I guess I'm comfortable with the idea of expressing that my product ingredients are generally closer to a natural state than those that use junk like SLES and other detergents. Usually when I educate the customer on the difference (and point out what's "natural" and what's not in my soaps), they seem genuinely appreciative of the information.
 

paillo

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SpendorSoap, THIS. I try not to get lost in the semantics of what's exactly natural or not, don't want to get into that kind of argument at, say, a market. I explain to people that it's a more natural product than most commercial products, and what happens to lye during saponification, and that FOs and micas (I don't make many FO soaps but love micas) are not natural. I sell to a local natural grocery where the beauty section is filled with soaps, many of which contain ingredients similar to mine. The staff is familiar with what goes into soap (I've helped explain it), and I appreciate that they, too, can educate customers. Mine are made with more than the usual variety of nice oils (and now lard and tallow, so those don't go to that particular store), nice additives, thought, creativity and attention to beauty.

I DON'T call mine 'natural' and as a result am happy and feel honest. In my mostly-health-conscious and educated markets people do carefully read labels and are not afraid to ask questions. I have nothing to hide.

About to take a months-long hiatus from making and selling soap for a cross-country move which will put me in an even more elite, sophisticated, educated and health- and environment-conscious market. Can't wait, so looking forward to that!

At the end of the day, the most important thing for me is feeling no guilt in my marketing.
 

LisaAnne

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I'm eagerly waiting for a wild pig to be hit by a flaming tree.

I like all the soaps, mica, fragrance, clays, milks. Wish I were better at blending essential oils. When I did sell, I sold as soap. No ingredients listed. Where I sold people were more drawn to my more colorful artsy overly smelly melt and pour. My earthy HP didn't impress by looks.

Not sure what the flying pig and flaming tree thing means, but I'm slow :)
 

Relle

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Quote - Regular use of our soap cures psoriasis, eczema and other skin conditions like dry skin, itchy skin, and even bug bites.

I must tell all the dermatologists of the world that you have a cure for these conditions, they might be a little scared as you'll put them out of business.

Definition of an idiot - never argue with an idiot as they'll drag you down to their level and win through sheer experience. ( now, I wonder who that would be).
 
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