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Food grade lye?

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Black soap n candle lady

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I just found some food grade sodium hydroxide. Has any of you used this? I been using Rooto brand from my little hardware store down the street. They are selling 2 lbs for 10.99. Should I try this? Is this a good deal? They also say they are offering 7 lbs of pomice for 19.99 plus shipping on all of this of course.
 

MikeInPdx

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I don't buy food grade....I buy regular lye in bulk from Essential Wholesale and just pick it up.

However, food grade would be nice....I could make some homemade hominy.....mmmmmm. :) Maybe I'll investigate more.
 

soap_lady

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I get my lye from a seller who sells biodiels products..... For myself I look at the price first, making sure it's the exact product I'm looking for. Including the cost of shipping. I'm really happy with the results of my soap. In a pinch i have also picked up lye at a hardware type store in the plumbing section. But made sure it was lye and not a mix of chemicals. Some prefer to purchase food grade lye, but I'm not sure if the extra cost is worth it for the end product of soap.
 

MikeInPdx

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I would say that food grade isn't worth the extra $$$ if you only plan to soap with it.
 

MikeInPdx

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I don't know the criteria for food grade but basically, I think it's lye suitable for food processing plants....things like olives, hominy and grits, some chocolate products, and things like that.

Manufacturers grade would probably have impurities that make it unsuitable (or more likely didn't have that extra set of tests run and is probably the same thing.....the cynic coming out here)
 

SimplyE

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MikeInPdx said:
(or more likely didn't have that extra set of tests run and is probably the same thing.....the cynic coming out here)
:lol: Thanks!
 

chrisinflorida

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I use the food grade lye from AAA Chemicals also. Not sure how much of a difference it makes but here is what it says on their site:

SODIUM HYDROXIDE - LYE - NaOH - FOOD GRADE
Our best grade of sodium hydroxide. Use for small batches of soap or biodiesel when the quality of the caustic matters most. Also use if: you have been having problems with the consistency of batches, formulate with hard-to-saponify oil blends, or employ sensitive essential oils. This grade is also Food Codex / FCC / Kosher certified, with a Certificate of Analysis included. Use for Pretzels, Olives, Lutefisk, Hominy or any other food use. All products are shipped in easy-to-store, easy-to-use resealable HPDE containers.


This is what I've used from the beginning and it is not much more expensive than their technical grade.

Chris
 

eargirly

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Hominy is made with lye? I had no idea that there were foods that had lye involved. That is my new fact for the day!
 

IrishLass

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eargirly said:
Hominy is made with lye? I had no idea that there were foods that had lye involved. That is my new fact for the day!

Yep. Pretzels, too, and the others that Mike mentioned. I just noticed not to long ago that they sell bottled lye water at my local Asian grocery store. I'm not sure what they use it for in particular, though.

IrishLass
 

beachgurl

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Because it doesn't violate the Jewish laws pertaining to food comsumption. Here they are (the common ones):

Certain animals may not be eaten at all. This restriction includes the flesh, organs, eggs and milk of the forbidden animals.

Of the animals that may be eaten, the birds and mammals must be killed in accordance with Jewish law.

All blood must be drained from the meat or broiled out of it before it is eaten.

Certain parts of permitted animals may not be eaten.

Fruits and vegetables are permitted, but must be inspected for bugs


Meat (the flesh of birds and mammals) cannot be eaten with dairy. Fish, eggs, fruits, vegetables and grains can be eaten with either meat or dairy. (According to some views, fish may not be eaten with meat).

Utensils that have come into contact with meat may not be used with dairy, and vice versa.

Utensils that have come into contact with non-kosher food may not be used with kosher food. This applies only where the contact occurred while the food was hot.

Grape products made by non-Jews may not be eaten.
 

Black soap n candle lady

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Thanks so much for all of the great feedback and info! I had no idea that pretzels and hominy were processed with lye! I knew about the olives and lutefisk.(I love to watch Andrew Zimmern on Bizzare Foods! :p ) Currently I am paying $7 plus tax for just a few precious ounces of lye. I am just looking for a good deal. It doesnt have to be food grade. I want to look at the info that Paul has sent to me. His soaps look so nice! And Mike, forget the hominy. Let's have some lutefisk! :wink:
 

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