First Salt Bars Today

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Seawolfe

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This was actually my very first salt bar made a few years ago. And yes, I added the powdered turmeric directly to the batter and then did that gradient thing where you pour a layer, add some uncolored batter, mix, pour etc... If I don't know what a color is going to do, I like to make a gradient like this to see how it goes.
Lovely!
Did you infuse the oil?
The top layer looks like the turmeric was directly added to the batter.
I love the combination of both techniques.
 

Obsidian

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I think you will really like the recipe you used. If you want to experiment more, try the same recipe but with less salt. I used to use 100% salt and had issues with lather, turns out the combo of high salt and my hard water really killed the lather.
Went down to 50% and the lather is so much better, eventually went down to 35% and its great, just where I want it.

If you are looking for natural color that is a bit brighter/oranger than the tumeric, try annatto seeds. Cover a couple spoonfuls of seeds with your liquide oil of choice and let it sit for a few days. Shake every once in awhile, the oil will get quite bright. This really only works well if you are making a one color soap though.
 

LSdude

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I like that color, very nice. :thumbup:
Thanks

so you always have an excuse to make soap. :mrgreen:
I don't think I'll need an excuse anymore hahah

I think you will really like the recipe you used. If you want to experiment more, try the same recipe but with less salt. I used to use 100% salt and had issues with lather, turns out the combo of high salt and my hard water really killed the lather.
Went down to 50% and the lather is so much better, eventually went down to 35% and its great, just where I want it.

If you are looking for natural color that is a bit brighter/oranger than the tumeric, try annatto seeds. Cover a couple spoonfuls of seeds with your liquide oil of choice and let it sit for a few days. Shake every once in awhile, the oil will get quite bright. This really only works well if you are making a one color soap though.
I'm going to start to order a few more things in the new year. Some EO and natural colour.

I wasnt sure how much turmeric to use, so I did a bit of a gradient and realized that more is best on mine
That looks nice.

I added a litle oil to the tumeric and gave it a quick mix with a little milk frother then added it straight to the batter.


By the way Merry Christmas to everyone :santa:
 

Nanditasr

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After reading all the posts here, I am increasingly tempted to try a salt bar. I don't particularly like coconut oil since I find it drying. Therefore, what is the bare minimum % of CO that I can use in a salt bar, (assuming that the salt is 50% the weight of the oils)?
 

jcandleattic

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After reading all the posts here, I am increasingly tempted to try a salt bar. I don't particularly like coconut oil since I find it drying. Therefore, what is the bare minimum % of CO that I can use in a salt bar, (assuming that the salt is 50% the weight of the oils)?
You can make a salt bar with 0% coconut oil. People just use that oil because it will still lather with the salt, as with other oils, the lather will be significantly decreased to non-existent. However, that does not mean it will not clean. Lather doesn't = cleansing...
 

cmzaha

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But a salt bar with no lather is not fun at all :) I will advise not to use palm oil in salt bars in any amounts. It tends to make them waxy.
As for coloring with tumeric, I find tumeric eo much better with a prettier color
 

jcandleattic

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But a salt bar with no lather is not fun at all :)
haha right?
I make most of my salt bars with 75% Coconut Oil, 25% Olive Oil, and anywhere from 50-75% salt - usually a 60% range... After a 6 month cure - they are fanfreakingtastic, and one of my favorite bars and last forEVER. I will say though, they have to have that 6 month cure otherwise it's a no go for my skin...
I can usually wait a couple years for them to cure because I have that much soap - and the older the bar the better - of any soap - and that's my first go to when I run out in my shower...
 

Nanditasr

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You can make a salt bar with 0% coconut oil. People just use that oil because it will still lather with the salt, as with other oils, the lather will be significantly decreased to non-existent. However, that does not mean it will not clean. Lather doesn't = cleansing...
Thanks; I realise I framed my question badly! Let me try again:

Suppose I make a regular soap (without salt) using 15% CO. Now, I want to make a salt bar (50% of oils) that will give me the same amount of lather as the regular bar. By how much (or to how much) should I up the CO to achieve this? Also, will adding sugar help the lather?

I don't think SoapCalc allows us to take sugar and salt into account?

cmzaha: As you say, it's no fun without some lather -- and thanks for the tip on palm oil.
 

shunt2011

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Thanks; I realise I framed my question badly! Let me try again:

Suppose I make a regular soap (without salt) using 15% CO. Now, I want to make a salt bar (50% of oils) that will give me the same amount of lather as the regular bar. By how much (or to how much) should I up the CO to achieve this? Also, will adding sugar help the lather?

I don't think SoapCalc allows us to take sugar and salt into account?

cmzaha: As you say, it's no fun without some lather -- and thanks for the tip on palm oil.
Salt bars really need at least 75% CO I think. I've not gone that low. Salt will decrease your lather greatly without high CO content. I do 80% CO and 15-20% SF. You don't need to add your salt/sugar in the soap calculator as they are additives and don't saponify.
 

Misschief

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I follow Obsidian's salt bar recipe, with 50% salt by oil weight (80% OO, 15% OO, 5% castor), and not only is it my favourite soap, it's the only soap I use on my face. I have, and have always had, dry skin. The salt soap leaves my skin feeling smooth and not at all tight. I always follow up with a touch of moisturizer and my skin has never looked, or felt, better. The bar I'm using right now is probably close to a year old and it's amazing. The lather is plentiful and creamy but when I add a little more water, so luxuriously bubbly.

Incidentally, I don't put this one in a loaf mold; I only use individual cavity molds for my soap bars. That way, I don't have to worry about being around at the right time to cut them. Aside from that, I find that they fit my hand better than a bar does.
 

shunt2011

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Now I can't wait to get the individual bar molds I just ordered. I think the very first thing I'll do with them is make a batch of salt bars to try out.
Be sure to keep them covered, I get the most ash on my salt bars when I put them in individual molds. I generally leave them covered for 2-3 days until saponification is completed. If not, huge ash problem, sometimes so thick I can't wash it off. I also spray those buggers with alcohol really well.

They are one of my favorite bars to use.
 

Kittish

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Be sure to keep them covered, I get the most ash on my salt bars when I put them in individual molds. I generally leave them covered for 2-3 days until saponification is completed. If not, huge ash problem, sometimes so thick I can't wash it off. I also spray those buggers with alcohol really well.

They are one of my favorite bars to use.
Thanks for the heads up. I'll probably wind up putting a layer of plastic wrap down on top of each one, followed by cardboard so I can stack them. 500 or 750g of oils plus water plus 50-60% salt should fill two or three of the molds- each one makes 4 bars. I bought a couple of bags of canning and pickling salt today to use in them. Not Morton, some brand I've never heard of, but the salt feels like it's pretty fine grained through the bag it's in.
 

Kittish

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Made my first batch of salt bars!

Recipe is 75% coconut oil, 20% apricot kernel oil, 5% castor oil with 50% salt added to the oils and 20% SF. Poured into individual molds, sprayed well with alcohol and covered. Color is Rainforest Mica Powder from Nurture. Unscented. I soaped at around 120*F, and it took a few minutes to come to about a medium trace, but not forever. Though it did seem like it was going to STAY at medium trace for quite a while. I've got 9 rectangular bars (the new molds) plus the six flowers.



Here are the bars, out of the mold.



No ash on them (yet), but there's still a possibility they might develop some. The flowers are still too soft to unmold (I thought salt bars were notorious for getting really hard really fast??).
 
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