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First Attempt at Soap (hot process, well-used fry oil, sour milk)

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Jenna D

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Hmm ... sounds interesting. I'm thinking ground shredded coconut or finely ground orange/lemon peels would be cheap. Especially if you eat oranges. Just shred and dry, then grind them up. :)
If the irange is anything like avocado skins, you'll want to grind them up and then dry them! Avocado skins are rock hard when dried!
 

JakeBlanton

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Interesting Experiment. Since you were doing HP, I assumed the rice would cook itself with all that extra water and soften itself. So the cracked rice remained hard and effective as an abrasive? Did you add the rice last after the cook (with the pine-sol)?
The ground rice was put in after the last remelt. The Pine-Sol was put in during the initial blending (a few remelts ago). As far as I can tell, the rice did not seem to soften noticeably. I doubt that I will use it again though... I was just curious how it might change it...
 
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Mistrael

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My husband builds semi-truck transmissions for a living, and regularly comes home with grubby hands. Yes, he washes before leaving work, but the cheap work soap doesn't do a great job. I make a very nice salt bar with 100% coconut oil, 20% SF, and varying percentages of fine sea salt. It takes off the grime & grease while also being a pleasant experience for anyone else who uses it. My latest batch has a light mint scent and pale green color. We discovered its usefulness on grease & grime quite by accident, and he was amazed at how clean his hands looked & felt without drying his skin.
 

Kcryss

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My husband builds semi-truck transmissions for a living, and regularly comes home with grubby hands. Yes, he washes before leaving work, but the cheap work soap doesn't do a great job. I make a very nice salt bar with 100% coconut oil, 20% SF, and varying percentages of fine sea salt. It takes off the grime & grease while also being a pleasant experience for anyone else who uses it. My latest batch has a light mint scent and pale green color. We discovered its usefulness on grease & grime quite by accident, and he was amazed at how clean his hands looked & felt without drying his skin.
That sounds like what I need to make for my SIL. :)
 

cmzaha

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My husband builds semi-truck transmissions for a living, and regularly comes home with grubby hands. Yes, he washes before leaving work, but the cheap work soap doesn't do a great job. I make a very nice salt bar with 100% coconut oil, 20% SF, and varying percentages of fine sea salt. It takes off the grime & grease while also being a pleasant experience for anyone else who uses it. My latest batch has a light mint scent and pale green color. We discovered its usefulness on grease & grime quite by accident, and he was amazed at how clean his hands looked & felt without drying his skin.
Adding in some Oatmeal and Orange Oil and help even more. I always add oatmeal to my 100% salt bars because customers expect them to be more scrubby than my other soaps, and just do not realize the fine salt will usually become smooth. Even though the orange oils will not necessarily hold scent especially in salt bars the orange eo will help cut grease and oil.
 

CatahoulaBubble

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It started out as a recipe... At least as much of a recipe as you can have when you are not entirely sure what oils are in the used fry oil -- probably soybean, cottonseed, corn, canola, and various animal fats... From there, it became more of wing it thing to see what would happen if different things got added to it since I did not consider the first iteration as hard enough for a hand soap. It only got to about fudge type hardness initially. If I had never achieved a hard soap, it would not be a deal breaker though. Since it was just for my own use for cleaning grease and such off my hands, I could just cast it into a large open top container and rub my hand across the top of it when I needed to wash my hands. Kind of somewhere between a liquid and a bar soap, I guess... :)

The 2nd batch that I made with a single vegetable oil hardened up noticeably better, although since I didn't know what type of vegetable oil it was, I might not have had enough lye. Regardless, it worked and my wife seems to like the way it makes her skin feel -- she tends to have dry skin and normally ends up putting tons of lotions on after a shower.
Sounds like you made the kind of soap my great grandmother would make. She used a mixture of cooking fats and trimmings off the pork and beef and would render it down to get the crumbles out of it and then she'd mix up her lye water using the ashes from the woodstove. She'd set a pot by the fire and add the lye and her fats and let it cook down. The soap she ended up with was a soft brown soap that she'd just scoop out what she needed. It was like a playdough consistency.
 

Mistrael

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Adding in some Oatmeal and Orange Oil and help even more. I always add oatmeal to my 100% salt bars because customers expect them to be more scrubby than my other soaps, and just do not realize the fine salt will usually become smooth. Even though the orange oils will not necessarily hold scent especially in salt bars the orange eo will help cut grease and oil.
I'll have to try that next time!
 

shunt2011

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My husband builds semi-truck transmissions for a living, and regularly comes home with grubby hands. Yes, he washes before leaving work, but the cheap work soap doesn't do a great job. I make a very nice salt bar with 100% coconut oil, 20% SF, and varying percentages of fine sea salt. It takes off the grime & grease while also being a pleasant experience for anyone else who uses it. My latest batch has a light mint scent and pale green color. We discovered its usefulness on grease & grime quite by accident, and he was amazed at how clean his hands looked & felt without drying his skin.
My ex was a machinist and was always filthy. He used a salt bar that I added pumice and some 10x orange to quite frequently also took some into work and the other guys in the shops loved it too.
 

Teresa408

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My husband builds semi-truck transmissions for a living, and regularly comes home with grubby hands. Yes, he washes before leaving work, but the cheap work soap doesn't do a great job. I make a very nice salt bar with 100% coconut oil, 20% SF, and varying percentages of fine sea salt. It takes off the grime & grease while also being a pleasant experience for anyone else who uses it. My latest batch has a light mint scent and pale green color. We discovered its usefulness on grease & grime quite by accident, and he was amazed at how clean his hands looked & felt without drying his skin.
I second the use of 100% coconut oil for serious cleaning. I made a small batch for cleaning paintbrushes and spot cleaning laundry. For natural hair brushes, I rinse them in diluted vinegar after cleaning.
 

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