Finding work after 55 :(

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by SunRiseArts, Sep 24, 2017.

  1. Sep 24, 2017 #1

    SunRiseArts

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    I have lately been looking for to work again. We have a situation where I must.

    I have not work in 15 years, even though I am highly qualified, because I have two sons with autism that needed lots of support. They are now on a good path, and I am so proud of them.

    I used to be able to walk to an interview and get the job, and start the next day. In today's world, everything in though the computer, and there is so much competition. I have not been very lucky. Feels like such an uphill battle for this time in my life. Seems that all those years of no experience now are an obstacle to start again.

    Anyone has recommendation? Anything to guide me?. :(
     
  2. Sep 24, 2017 #2

    Kittish

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    Alas, all I can offer is commiseration. I've been in that spot, though I'm only 40-something. Seems like all anyone wants to hire anymore is just out of high school and college kids. Part of it is that they'll usually work for less. More experience = higher expected pay and these days it's all about the bottom line and the top bosses/stockholders lining their pockets as much as they can. I hope you're able to find something soon.
     
  3. Sep 24, 2017 #3

    JuliaB

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    I don't know the particulars of your qualifications and insurance needs and such. But for what it's worth, I'd say to just remember employers aren't the only game in town. Just one example, cleaning houses is easy to get into for yourself and you can make $15-$20 an hour. Best wishes to you.
     
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  4. Sep 24, 2017 #4

    BattleGnome

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    Good luck. I'm under 30 and having issues finding a new job (small town, nothing is available or pays enough).

    I've fully given up looking for a traditional job. Right now I'm looking into what I can do online/at home and at most I come up with part time options or customer service phone jobs.

    It really is hard out there, good luck
     
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  5. Sep 24, 2017 #5

    Susie

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    A friend of mine got a job at talent/luxottica.com. They make and sell eyeglasses, but they are a big company with lots of openings if you are looking to get into retail.
     
  6. Sep 24, 2017 #6

    Rusti

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    I have a blog I can point you to: askamanager.org

    Alison has lots of advice on resumes and cover letters and interviewing that may be able to help you move forward nowadays (and if you like entertainment, lots of other doozies she gets sent to her to answer that are like train wrecks where you can't look away).
     
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  7. Sep 24, 2017 #7

    JoeyG

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    Sorry to hear about your situation. One option would be online sales. If you own your own, or are good at sourcing product, Amazon could be a solution for you. It's the biggest online store on the planet, and they don't discriminate merely because you're a mom & pop shop.

    There are two options for selling on Amazon.

    1.) FBA (Fulfilled by Amazon)
    With this option you prepare your product and ship it to Amazon. Amazon is then responsible for packing and shipping your item to the customer. There are a few caveats to using this method, but overall it's a legitimate option for making money. Especially if you don't necessarily want to spend 40 hours a week working.

    2.) Merchant Fulfilled
    With this option you are responsible for shipping your product to the customer. This option is more time consuming than FBA. The Amazon fees aren't as high on the Merchant Fulfilled option, but you don't get the Buy Box as much either. And again, there are caveats to this method as well, but still a viable option.

    There are a ton of videos on YouTube that can explain how to start selling on Amazon. I'm including a link to a video by a couple who are pretty successful doing this. The young lady wasn't really even a computer person, and didn't have a lot of money to start with.

    https://youtu.be/axKLScqiM-8

    Good luck
     
  8. Sep 24, 2017 #8

    lsg

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    No advice from me, but prayer for the right job to be sent your way.:
     
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  9. Sep 24, 2017 #9

    Steve85569

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    ^^^ That!
    There is a job out there for you and since you've been "out of market" for so many years it will take some time to get you and the job together.

    Keep trying!!
     
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  10. Sep 25, 2017 #10

    SunRiseArts

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    Thank you all! I really appreciate all the help, and I take as many prayers as anyone can send! ;)


    I have a bachelors in business and a specialization in insurance. I also have a real state license.

    I worked as secretary assistant of ceos for many years. And in reinsurance companies. But to work again in insurance I would need to take several courses to get up to date, and pay and pass 3 test for a certification which are very expensive.

    Same thing with real estate. You have to be sponsored by a broker, to whom you have to pay a monthly fee whether you sell or not. And in the market where I live is absolutely saturated with real estate agents, there is a lot of demand, and not that many houses for sell. Then you have to take courses for the agency you work for, that on most cases come out of your pocket too. It all adds to the thousands before you even start getting income.

    Everything is such a racket. And I really, really do not want to be in an office all day again. I did it for 30 years, and hated it.

    I am not big on Amazon, but I will check it out. I already do that on eBay, but the income is minimal.

    Guess back to filling more applications. ARGGGGGG! I am sure something will pop up.

    Thanks you again. You guys are all so awesome.
     
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  11. Sep 25, 2017 #11

    BattleGnome

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    https://mywifequitherjob.com

    ^^that guy. He got his start with the amazon stuff and has guides on how to find inventory. For a while I looked into the dropshipping thing but ultimately decided it wasn't for me. Since you've already got the "stores" maybe you can make it work.
     
  12. Sep 25, 2017 #12

    JoeyG

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    There is no comparison between Amazon and eBay when it comes to number of sales. For us, it was like a 100/1 ratio. We eventually stopped even listing anything on eBay.
     
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  13. Sep 25, 2017 #13

    jcandleattic

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    Go to your local unemployment office - not to get unemployment - and speak to a representative. They have programs and resources to help find people good jobs that match their skill level. It may take some work on your part, but they do have many programs and people at your disposal for either free on little to no cost on your part.
     
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  14. Sep 25, 2017 #14

    SoapTrey

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    I'm so sorry you're having to go through this and I'll certainly send some prayers your way.

    I would suggest a Temp Agency. You can at least get your foot in the door and showcase your talent with hopes of a full-time offer. This option puts you in the drivers seat, so you can try out different jobs/employers until you find one that 'clicks' and hopefully they would find you valuable enough hire.

    There will be a lot of retail hiring for the holidays, so you should be able to at least get a part time gig and I hear that if you really put forth a good effort, some places will end up offering you full-time after the holidays.

    The idea of working for yourself is excellent, so cleaning houses, house sitting, pet sitting, elder care, etc. are very good options to consider.

    I see takl is offered in your area. https://www.takl.com/ You could sign up to be a takl provider offering whatever on demand service you can.

    Just some ideas that may help...
     
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  15. Sep 27, 2017 #15

    bobcat

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    Hi.

    I think that is not so easy, but everything is possible, specially for people who don't give up.
     
  16. Sep 27, 2017 #16

    dixiedragon

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    Are you open to doing child care for autistic children? It's very hard for parents with autistic children (or children with other severe issues) to find childcare, and they often pay top-dollar for care. A friend of mine knows a lady who specializes in this and she is booked out for weeks in advance, making very good money.
     
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  17. Sep 28, 2017 #17

    SunRiseArts

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    Thank you all so much! I do have an appointment on a temp agency next week, wish me luck!

    I was trying to get a secretarial job at dr pepper, but they have not called back :(

    The autistic thing is a good idea. I have two adult sons with autism, that I have put through school, and college. They both hold good jobs, and live an almost normal life. So I really have experience on that!
     
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  18. Sep 28, 2017 #18

    earlene

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    First I'd like to point out that by saying 'all those years without experience' is discrediting the skills and experience you did achieve while working through what, I am sure, were sometimes seemingly insurmountable obstacles. I have two relatives with autism and know it not an easy time; in my opinion the parents of children with autism are saints, and even more so when they successfully assist preparing their children to living successfully into adulthood.

    So my suggestion to you is to re-visit your achievements and your employment options that would fit those spectacular skills you have developed. How about putting some of those skills down on paper and evaluate how they are transferable in the work force? And look at what types of jobs are available in your area, and re-assess these awesome skills you have achieved in light of how they will transfer in those jobs.

    I have every confidence that with your success behind you with your sons, that you will be able to tackle the task of re-assessing your skills and finding a way to see that they truly are transferable to the workplace (in pretty much any given work situation.) It's really just a matter of perspective.

    Then start writing how you would re-write your resumé to address the transferablility of those skills and to sit down and write out some practice interview responses based on questions that might be posted online for specific types of jobs you would be applying for. That can go a long way to get you ready to go in with confidence.
     
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  19. Sep 28, 2017 #19

    lsg

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    Raising two autistic sons to a productive adulthood sounds like you have a lot of good experience. You might apply for a job as a through a local autism society or local health care organiztion. They might be willing to help with any extra training that you would need.
     
  20. Sep 28, 2017 #20

    Gini

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    First, read through all of the uplifting, truthful and appropriate posts again and again. I can't improve on them. As Earlene suggested, reassess your skillset, then think outside the box and about what you would like to do. I told my daughter when she was having trouble deciding what to do about a career and education, "Figure out what you like to do, then figure out a way to make money at it." About a week later she came to me heavy-hearted and sighing. The only thing she really enjoyed was shopping. After a few more conversations she decided on her career. She obtained her degree and became a buyer for Macy's in California.

    So, to start:

    1. You make soap and likely a variety of other things. So you have a working knowledge of some chemistry, working knowledge of math, artistic talent, patience, problem-solving skills, precision...
    2. Insurance and real estate. Marketing skills, human interaction skills, more math skills some limited legal knowledge, likely detail oriented, clerical skills...
    3. Raising two (autistic) sons to productive adulthood. (I don't know if you have other children in addition.) Chauffer, limited medical knowledge, nurturing, patient, adaptable, organized, excellent communicator, self-deferring, persuasive, empathetic, able to take direction, able to give direction, more problem solving, time manager, cook, negotiator, actress, goal oriented, money manager, mediator...

    You are a Superhero! Who WOULDN'T want a superhero working with them!

    PS -

    Also, don't discount the tried and true "hitting the pavement" and calling every one you know. There is still no substitute for real communication and human interaction.
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2017
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