FDA Needs Help Defining "Natural"

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MySoapyHeart

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Wow, I love that they actually ask for comments on this issue, because then they will surely get input and information they may not have considered before, and can take apropriate steps to make things easier for consumers and producers of food related things.

They are closing for comments on may 10`th, so hopefully they will have received a lot of feedback that they can put to good use.
 

dixiedragon

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It's an interesting question. What are my answers?

1) It would be possible for people using simple tools/techniques to create this. For example, you can make coconut oil in your home by grinding up coconut, boiling it, etc. It's just not very time and energy efficient for us to do this.

2) It's chemically (probably a better word for this) identical to it's state in nature. Example: I would consider rolled oats to be natural, even though there aren't giant rolling things in nature to flatten an oat, it is still chemically identical to the oat plucked off of the plant.
 

kchaystack

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I hope they don't just go with the majority of answers, in which case it will be "anything that isn't a chemical" [emoji39]
I kind of hope they do - since everything is a chemical. Then no one could use the word 'Natural' to define things. Might put Whole Foods out of business - but I can live with that. Haha
 

Susie

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It's an interesting question. What are my answers?

1) It would be possible for people using simple tools/techniques to create this. For example, you can make coconut oil in your home by grinding up coconut, boiling it, etc. It's just not very time and energy efficient for us to do this.

2) It's chemically (probably a better word for this) identical to it's state in nature. Example: I would consider rolled oats to be natural, even though there aren't giant rolling things in nature to flatten an oat, it is still chemically identical to the oat plucked off of the plant.
Hey, don't just tell us, tell them. Please? This is one of the best definitions I could ever imagine.
 

dixiedragon

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I kind of hope they do - since everything is a chemical. Then no one could use the word 'Natural' to define things. Might put Whole Foods out of business - but I can live with that. Haha
NOOOO. Then where would I get my ginger miso dressing?
Hey, don't just tell us, tell them. Please? This is one of the best definitions I could ever imagine.
Thanks for the compliment! I am planning to submit my thoughts, I just want to see if any of our sciency-types can point out some flaws in my reasoning?
 
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Arimara

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It's an interesting question. What are my answers?

1) It would be possible for people using simple tools/techniques to create this. For example, you can make coconut oil in your home by grinding up coconut, boiling it, etc. It's just not very time and energy efficient for us to do this.

2) It's chemically (probably a better word for this) identical to it's state in nature. Example: I would consider rolled oats to be natural, even though there aren't giant rolling things in nature to flatten an oat, it is still chemically identical to the oat plucked off of the plant.
Maybe we could use the word 'bioavailable' when if comes to nutrients found in our foods. :mrgreen: I'm tired of it only being used (by me) when giving a reason why I don't rely on spinach for iron, chocolate milk (or milk) for calcium, and veggie proteins as a legitimate source of protein/ B vitamins for me and mine.
 

dixiedragon

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Maybe we could use the word 'bioavailable' when if comes to nutrients found in our foods. :mrgreen: I'm tired of it only being used (by me) when giving a reason why I don't rely on spinach for iron, chocolate milk (or milk) for calcium, and veggie proteins as a legitimate source of protein/ B vitamins for me and mine.
Does that mean that iron is not bio-available in spinach?

I also wonder if, by my "definition" gluten and gluten-free would no longer be natural? The wheat is, but I don't think it's possible to separate the gluten and the non-gluten part of the wheat (no idea what that is called) by any natural means? White flour is also probably not natural.
 

Arimara

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Does that mean that iron is not bio-available in spinach?

I also wonder if, by my "definition" gluten and gluten-free would no longer be natural? The wheat is, but I don't think it's possible to separate the gluten and the non-gluten part of the wheat (no idea what that is called) by any natural means? White flour is also probably not natural.
It's oxalic acid in it that affects it's bioavailability. You can get some out of it but not as much as (don't hate me) red meat or even some other veggies/fruits, some nuts, and seeds. Still, spinach is nutritious enough that you can still eat it but if you want iron out of it, you're better off cooking it. I like mine in some soups or sauteed with a "health" dollop of minced garlic (really, spinach just flavors up my garlic :))
 

Navaria

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Since this is for food labels, I'm just wondering how long it will take to cross over to the soap/b&b side.
 

TeresaT

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It's oxalic acid in it that affects it's bioavailability. You can get some out of it but not as much as (don't hate me) red meat or even some other veggies/fruits, some nuts, and seeds. Still, spinach is nutritious enough that you can still eat it but if you want iron out of it, you're better off cooking it. I like mine in some soups or sauteed with a "health" dollop of minced garlic (really, spinach just flavors up my garlic :))
Kale is my go-to green food. I discovered the wonders of kale when I had guinea pigs and fed it to them (super high in Vitamins A and C - piggies don't make their own vitamin C like we do). Since all of their veggies were fresh, I'd nibble as I prepped and learned to love the bite kale has. Now, I am addicted to it. It also has great anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties as well as being super high in potassium. It's considered a "super food" and is high in iron (7% RDA) as far as veggies go. I prefer mine raw or juiced; however, it is great in bean soup, too. Or steamed with some garlic, or...
 

earlene

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Does that mean that iron is not bio-available in spinach?

I also wonder if, by my "definition" gluten and gluten-free would no longer be natural? The wheat is, but I don't think it's possible to separate the gluten and the non-gluten part of the wheat (no idea what that is called) by any natural means? White flour is also probably not natural.
Actually there is a natural way to separate the gluten from the starch in wheat. I use wheat gluten to make seitan. Here is a video that shows the process of separating gluten, you too can do at home. :) [ame="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9nCYhlj5Z1c"]Here is a video[/ame]
 

earlene

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Kale is my go-to green food. I discovered the wonders of kale when I had guinea pigs and fed it to them (super high in Vitamins A and C - piggies don't make their own vitamin C like we do). Since all of their veggies were fresh, I'd nibble as I prepped and learned to love the bite kale has. Now, I am addicted to it. It also has great anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties as well as being super high in potassium. It's considered a "super food" and is high in iron (7% RDA) as far as veggies go. I prefer mine raw or juiced; however, it is great in bean soup, too. Or steamed with some garlic, or...
I am also a kale lover and have even used kale-infused oil in soap. It seems to feel pretty nice on the skin, and it lends a pale greenish tinge to the soap.

Sorry, for not responding to the topic at hand, which is the definition of natural.

IMO GMO is not natural & I let them know I feel that way.
 

Arimara

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I am also a kale lover and have even used kale-infused oil in soap. It seems to feel pretty nice on the skin, and it lends a pale greenish tinge to the soap.

Sorry, for not responding to the topic at hand, which is the definition of natural.

IMO GMO is not natural & I let them know I feel that way.
GMO is something that I'm sure somebody has argued about being around for a millennium. Nevermind that fact that there are starkly staunch difference between the natural 'gmos', brought to us by pollinization and careful breeding selections and the bio-engineered abominations they are passing to us as food (tomatoes with fish DNA that helps it last longer?)
 

TeresaT

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GMO is something that I'm sure somebody has argued about being around for a millennium. Nevermind that fact that there are starkly staunch difference between the natural 'gmos', brought to us by pollinization and careful breeding selections and the bio-engineered abominations they are passing to us as food (tomatoes with fish DNA that helps it last longer?)
I went online and added my comments. This is one of the things I mentioned. There is a huge difference between cross pollinating and hybridizing different plants or grains and actually inserting foreign genetic codes into the genetic codes of the intended product. One is a natural evolutionary process that takes years and years to develop because it is hit or miss to get the outcome you are looking for; the other is intentionally mutating an organism to become some unknown organism with the majority of characteristics of the original and only some characteristics of the foreign DNA. The problem (to me) is you can't determine exactly what characteristics of that foreign DNA will actually be carried and for how long. What if your "perfect" DNA starts to break down and randomly mutate in four or five generations? What the heck happens then? I sure don't want to be the guinea pig for science to figure that out. There is nothing natural about GMOs and they should not be labeled "natural." I don't believe they belong in the human food chain at all. Which means that animals destined for human consumption should not be fed with GMO foods. (Animals destined for human consumption should only be eating grass or whatever is their natural food in the first place. They shouldn't be given growth hormones or antibiotics, either. I choose not to eat commercially produced meats. I eat venison or locally raised organic meat.) Sorry, to stray from the topic. But most of the stuff you get at the grocery store is not "natural" and shouldn't be labeled as such. If there is an ingredient in it you can't pronounce, put it back and keep going.
 

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It's oxalic acid in it that affects it's bioavailability. You can get some out of it but not as much as (don't hate me) red meat or even some other veggies/fruits, some nuts, and seeds. Still, spinach is nutritious enough that you can still eat it but if you want iron out of it, you're better off cooking it. I like mine in some soups or sauteed with a "health" dollop of minced garlic (really, spinach just flavors up my garlic :))
You can also have some Vit. C type food with it to boost how much iron is absorbed. But, as above, you are better off cooking it if you are counting on the iron. It is still part of a healthy diet, though. So don't stop eating it because one nutrient is not as high as you thought.
 

Arimara

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You can also have some Vit. C type food with it to boost how much iron is absorbed. But, as above, you are better off cooking it if you are counting on the iron. It is still part of a healthy diet, though. So don't stop eating it because one nutrient is not as high as you thought.
Are you kidding me? I wouldn't dream of stopping my spinach consumption. It's just getting my daughter to stop being a pain about eating her veggies I'm more concerned with. XD
 
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