Expired unopened hazelnut oil in a can stored at a room temp

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What is the best thing to do with expired but unopened hazelnut oil in a can which is stored at a room temp?
Can I still make soap with it?
The expiry date on the can is June 2021. I haven't opened it. It is one of those Roasted Hazelnut Oil by La Tourangelle, the kind you can use as cooking oil and fresh one smells divine, but this has expired date on the can...
It is rather expensive now, it is now listed over $20 per can. I missed using it as I had so many other oils and got very busy making rather standard soaps.
I do have two more cans of this same exact hazelnut oil which I purchased earlier this year so I do have hazenlut oil (it was cheaper then).
I guess I am hesitating it to just throw it away as the oil is so costly now. Wow the olive oil to pretty much everything has gone up so high I can't believe it.
I can make liquid and solid soaps, even I can do dual lye to HP to CP, I can formulate soaps well as I have been doing this for nearly 20 years.
What would you do with it? Would you still make soaps after smelling it?
Have you used expired hazelnut oil or liquid oil which was unopened like a year or more? What was your experience with it?
Oh, I use hazelnut oil as facial soap normally, I made ones earlier this year (with fresh unexpired ones), it's around 70% hazelnut oil with smaller amount of cleansing and a bit of hard oils. It makes gorgeous luxurious bars.
I also found expensive Argan oil sitting on the back of the oil stocks which was unopened too. It came in brown dark bottle expired for a year+, stored in the same place. I smelled it and no rancid smell. I ended up making a small batch of 15% Argan oil facial soap as HP (solid soap). I cooked with 0% SF including the Argan oil, and I added SF later so I saponified Argan oil all the way. It's curing now for 3 weeks and I just love the soap (I tried the small sample). Nothing seems to be rancid thank goodness and I used lots of lavender EO, smells nice. No sign of rancidity and no irritation to the skin so far.
I wonder if I should do the similar thing...just scared opening the can and hit with rancid smell lol.
Any pointers or past experience using expired hard to waste oils would be appreciated.
 
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Honestly, I use the smell test most of the time, and will also taste a bit of it (assuming it is an edible oil like this one, not neem, pine tar, or the like). If it doesn’t taste or smell expired, I’ll add an appropriate amount of ROE to the newly-opened container, and will use it quickly to make a product for home use only. Or for friends who really, really understand what to look for and report to me.

I personally wouldn’t use lavender EO with older oils, because I find it can hasten rancidity at times. I also expect any soap batter made with older oils to trace quickly, due to the likelihood of more free fatty acids. In other words, I wouldn’t plan a complicated soap with this oil.

Good luck, and let us know how it goes for you! :)
 
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If it does not smell rancid go for it. I have used un-opened gallon bottles of oils that were at least 8 yrs and they were fine. They came from a person destashing that tried to tell me they were fresh, which at the time I knew came from the supplier before I had started soaping at the time due to the labeling. So go by your nose and add ROE as Allison mentioned.
 

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