Euxyl K910 - Paraben and Formaldehyde Free Preservative

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Kcryss

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I have been trying to find Euxyl K940 referenced on the Making Skin Care site. Preservative Reviews (makingskincare.com)

I haven't found a supplier for Euxyl K940, but lotioncrafters has Euxyl K910 which is fairly close. Has anyone tried this preservative? I've been thinking about ordering some since my liquid germall plus is almost out but wanted to get opinions if anyone else has tried it out yet.

Edit: Forgot the link Euxyl® PE 9010 | Lotioncrafter :)
 

Todd Ziegler

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I have not tried it myself because I like the results with the germall plus. Can I ask why you want to switch because that could be helpful to finding an answer for you.
 

Kcryss

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I have a daughter recently diagnosed with a rare skin disease, a grandson with eczema, and a SIL with rosacea. I make lotions, shampoos and skin care stuff for them and was trying to get a bit more skin friendly.

Edit: The disease she was diagnosed with is Pemphigus foliaceus.
I did formulate a cream that has been working ok with my grandson, but doesn't help with my daughter. Both Germall Plus and Euxyl K910 can be irritants, but wondering if maybe one is less so than the other.
 
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Quanta

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I have a daughter recently diagnosed with a rare skin disease, a grandson with eczema, and a SIL with rosacea. I make lotions, shampoos and skin care stuff for them and was trying to get a bit more skin friendly.

Edit: The disease she was diagnosed with is Pemphigus foliaceus.
I did formulate a cream that has been working ok with my grandson, but doesn't help with my daughter. Both Germall Plus and Euxyl K910 can be irritants, but wondering if maybe one is less so than the other.
You would need to know what their particular irritants are, and what they're allergic to. Everyone's skin is different. You may well be swapping in something they can't tolerate. Have they had patch tests done or other tests to determine what their triggers are? Has a dermatologist advised them to avoid certain ingredients, or to stick with certain other ingredients?

Sometimes, if someone has a skin condition that isn't reponding well to certain formulations, it may not be the preservative they're reacting to, but the inclusion of botanical ingredients that is causing flare-ups. The reason for this is that ingredients that include plant proteins are more likely to trigger the body's immune response, whereas synthetic ingredients are typically extremely inert due to the fact that the ingredients do not contain any plant material. I have several prescription ointments that are almost entirely gentle synthetics like mineral oil and fatty alcohols such as cetyl and stearyl alcohol. Those ointments are formulated that way specifically to avoid exacerbating skin issues in individuals who don't tolerate plant-based ingredients. Those gentle synthetic ingredients are readily available (except the medication components), so I would recommend you try something along those lines if someone has not responded well to formulas you've tried thus far.
 

violets2217

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I just ordered it from Lotion Crafter last week to try out some liquid shampoo and conditioner. I’ll let you know what I think when I get around to making it? I’ve never used it before and am try out some recipes on the sites Formulary.... so not sure how much help I’ll be!
ETA: I also use Germall plus and don’t find it irritating... but we will see what I think of the new preservative!
 

Quanta

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I just ordered it from Lotion Crafter last week to try out some liquid shampoo and conditioner. I’ll let you know what I think when I get around to making it? I’ve never used it before and am try out some recipes on the sites Formulary.... so not sure how much help I’ll be!
ETA: I also use Germall plus and don’t find it irritating... but we will see what I think of the new preservative!
Be careful when using Euxyl 9010 in surfactant systems, as certain surfactants will deactivate it.
For more info: Q&A: Euxyl PE 9010: What does “high levels of surfactants” mean when it comes to inactivating it? – Point of Interest
 

linne1gi

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I have been trying to find Euxyl K940 referenced on the Making Skin Care site. Preservative Reviews (makingskincare.com)

I haven't found a supplier for Euxyl K940, but lotioncrafters has Euxyl K910 which is fairly close. Has anyone tried this preservative? I've been thinking about ordering some since my liquid germall plus is almost out but wanted to get opinions if anyone else has tried it out yet.

Edit: Forgot the link Euxyl® PE 9010 | Lotioncrafter :)
Yes, I use Euxyl PE 9010 frequently. This is what I understand about Euxyl (High loads of ethoxylated surfactants can result in a loss of efficacy.) To my knowledge Polysorbate 80 is an ethoxylated surfactant.
 

Zany_in_CO

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QUICK GUIDE TO PRESERVATIVES IN ORGANIC SKIN CARE

EcoCert, the international organic inspection and certification body, approves a number of preservatives:

Cosmos (Cosmetic Organic Standard) is the standard that is used by a number of European organic labels.

I googled "EcoCert Preservatives" then I checked Lotion Crafter, The Herbarie, Skin Actives, Making Cosmetics. The only one that had one was:

Ingredients To Die For - Ecocert Preservatives

HTH

ETA: That link doesn't go to the page I found. Search "Ecocer Preservative" there to get to it. Use the info in the 1st link to help find what you need. ;)

I hope you don't have anything else to do for the rest of the day. 🤣
 
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Quanta

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QUICK GUIDE TO PRESERVATIVES IN ORGANIC SKIN CARE

EcoCert, the international organic inspection and certification body, approves a number of preservatives:

Cosmos (Cosmetic Organic Standard) is the standard that is used by a number of European organic labels.

I googled "EcoCert Preservatives" then I checked Lotion Crafter, The Herbarie, Skin Actives, Making Cosmetics. The only one that had one was:

Ingredients To Die For - Ecocert Preservatives

HTH

ETA: That link doesn't go to the page I found. Search "Ecocer Preservative" there to get to it. Use the info in the 1st link to help find what you need. ;)

I hope you don't have anything else to do for the rest of the day. 🤣
The list in the first link lists preservatives to avoid, but most of the ones in the list are only troublesome to people who have an allergy to them. If you're formulating for a specific person, verify they aren't allergic or sensitive to the one you want to use and you should be fine. If you're making products to sell however, that's when you'll want to research how common allergies and sensitivities are for the ingredients you want to use.

Of the preservatives on that page that are in the Ecocert approved list, none of them are going to be broad spectrum when used alone because they are individual ingredients usually used in blends. For instance, the Euxyl line of preservative blends start with a mix of phenoxyethanol and ethylhexylglycerin, and add other ingredients to customize it for specific applications. If you limit yourself to that list of Ecocert approved preservatives, you'll have to research each one and select ones that cover: gram negative bacteria, gram positive bacteria, fungus (yeast), and mold.
 

violets2217

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If using Euxyl 9010 - what to avoid...

Here is What to Look For:

  1. Polyethylene glycol, or PEG and ethylene glycol
    • In beauty products, it functions as an emulsifier (mixing water and oil) and skin conditioner. Generally, it is followed by a number, for example, PEG-200. The number following "PEG" is the number of moles (a unit of measure in chemistry) with which the glycol has been treated. (5) In simple terms, PEG-50 is polyethylene glycol that is treated with ethylene oxide 50 times.
  2. -eth ending ingredients
    • Two common examples are Sodium Laureth Sulfate (SLES) and Ceteareth-20. Ceteareth and other polyoxyethylene alcohols are surfactants treated by ethoxylation of fatty alcohol mixtures with ethylene oxide. (6)
    • Steareth-20.
  3. Emulsifying wax
    • A combination of Polysorbate 60 or Ceteareth-20 and Cetearyl Alcohol
  4. Polysorbate-20 and Polysorbate-40
Found in this article: How to Identify Beauty Products With Ethoxylated Ingredients — Dr. Sejal Beauty

I honestly think the only one I've ever used was Cetearyl Alcohol....
 

Quanta

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If using Euxyl 9010 - what to avoid...

Here is What to Look For:

  1. Polyethylene glycol, or PEG and ethylene glycol
    • In beauty products, it functions as an emulsifier (mixing water and oil) and skin conditioner. Generally, it is followed by a number, for example, PEG-200. The number following "PEG" is the number of moles (a unit of measure in chemistry) with which the glycol has been treated. (5) In simple terms, PEG-50 is polyethylene glycol that is treated with ethylene oxide 50 times.
  2. -ethending ingredients
    • Two common examples are Sodium Laureth Sulfate (SLES) and Ceteareth-20. Ceteareth and other polyoxyethylene alcohols are surfactants treated by ethoxylation of fatty alcohol mixtures with ethylene oxide. (6)
    • Steareth-20.
  3. Emulsifying wax
    • A combination of Polysorbate 60 or Ceteareth-20 and Cetearyl Alcohol
  4. Polysorbate-20 and Polysorbate-40
Found in this article: How to Identify Beauty Products With Ethoxylated Ingredients — Dr. Sejal Beauty

I honestly think the only one I've ever used was Cetearyl Alcohol....
The emulsifying wax mentioned is a combination of an ethoxylated ingredient (Polysorbate 60 or Ceteareth 20) with Cetearyl alcohol. They aren't saying that cetearyl alcohol is ethoxylated. In fact, if cetearyl alcohol were ethoxylated, it would be called something else. They're just saying that emulsifying wax has an ethoxylated ingredient in it.
 

violets2217

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The emulsifying wax mentioned is a combination of an ethoxylated ingredient (Polysorbate 60 or Ceteareth 20) with Cetearyl alcohol. They aren't saying that cetearyl alcohol is ethoxylated. In fact, if cetearyl alcohol were ethoxylated, it would be called something else. They're just saying that emulsifying wax has an ethoxylated ingredient in it.
Ahhh... I missed that! I need to check my one emulsifying wax now, though. And yep! Crafeter’s Choice soft & Silky...Not to be used with Euxyl 9010... good to know! Altleast I know the ingredients for the recipe I’m making does not include any of the above ingredients & I know now to use it for that conditioner only!
 

Kcryss

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Wow, it's been a little chaotic at my house for a few days. Thanks for all the responses!

You would need to know what their particular irritants are, and what they're allergic to. Everyone's skin is different. You may well be swapping in something they can't tolerate. Have they had patch tests done or other tests to determine what their triggers are? Has a dermatologist advised them to avoid certain ingredients, or to stick with certain other ingredients?

Sometimes, if someone has a skin condition that isn't responding well to certain formulations, it may not be the preservative they're reacting to, but the inclusion of botanical ingredients that is causing flare-ups. The reason for this is that ingredients that include plant proteins are more likely to trigger the body's immune response, whereas synthetic ingredients are typically extremely inert due to the fact that the ingredients do not contain any plant material. I have several prescription ointments that are almost entirely gentle synthetics like mineral oil and fatty alcohols such as cetyl and stearyl alcohol. Those ointments are formulated that way specifically to avoid exacerbating skin issues in individuals who don't tolerate plant-based ingredients. Those gentle synthetic ingredients are readily available (except the medication components), so I would recommend you try something along those lines if someone has not responded well to formulas you've tried thus far.
My grandson is 3 and has had eczema since birth. They didn't want to do patch tests at that age and have been managing it fairly well with OTC creams. She found Vanicream works the best to control but does not clear it up. I did a lot of research and made a formula with emu oil and ceramides and it is actually clearing it up better than anything prescribed previously or the OTC's she is using or has tried.
My daughter, with Pemphigus foliaceus has seen minor relief from this formula, but has to continue with the steroid creams prescribed to keep it under control. It may be that only the steroid creams and eventually chemo will help her, but I can't help trying to do anything I can. It's a mission of love and I don't give up quickly or easily. :)
To my knowledge, they do not do patch testing for Pemphigus foliaceus. At least, not that I have found.

I just ordered it from Lotion Crafter last week to try out some liquid shampoo and conditioner. I’ll let you know what I think when I get around to making it? I’ve never used it before and am try out some recipes on the sites Formulary.... so not sure how much help I’ll be!
ETA: I also use Germall plus and don’t find it irritating... but we will see what I think of the new preservative!
Great to hear. Will love to hear you thoughts after trying it out.

Be careful when using Euxyl 9010 in surfactant systems, as certain surfactants will deactivate it.
For more info: Q&A: Euxyl PE 9010: What does “high levels of surfactants” mean when it comes to inactivating it? – Point of Interest
Good to know! Thanks for the link!

Yes, I use Euxyl PE 9010 frequently. This is what I understand about Euxyl (High loads of ethoxylated surfactants can result in a loss of efficacy.) To my knowledge Polysorbate 80 is an ethoxylated surfactant.
Thanks @linne1gi. Glad to see someone else is using and I assume with success. :)
Looks like I will be doing some additional research on ethoxylated surfactants. :)

QUICK GUIDE TO PRESERVATIVES IN ORGANIC SKIN CARE

EcoCert, the international organic inspection and certification body, approves a number of preservatives:

Cosmos (Cosmetic Organic Standard) is the standard that is used by a number of European organic labels.

I googled "EcoCert Preservatives" then I checked Lotion Crafter, The Herbarie, Skin Actives, Making Cosmetics.
Sadly, the issue I have with organic preservatives is that there isn't anything broad spectrum. Maybe someday ... sadly not yet. :(

If using Euxyl 9010 - what to avoid...

Here is What to Look For:

  1. Polyethylene glycol, or PEG and ethylene glycol
    • In beauty products, it functions as an emulsifier (mixing water and oil) and skin conditioner. Generally, it is followed by a number, for example, PEG-200. The number following "PEG" is the number of moles (a unit of measure in chemistry) with which the glycol has been treated. (5) In simple terms, PEG-50 is polyethylene glycol that is treated with ethylene oxide 50 times.
  2. -ethending ingredients
    • Two common examples are Sodium Laureth Sulfate (SLES) and Ceteareth-20. Ceteareth and other polyoxyethylene alcohols are surfactants treated by ethoxylation of fatty alcohol mixtures with ethylene oxide. (6)
    • Steareth-20.
  3. Emulsifying wax
    • A combination of Polysorbate 60 or Ceteareth-20 and Cetearyl Alcohol
  4. Polysorbate-20 and Polysorbate-40
Found in this article: How to Identify Beauty Products With Ethoxylated Ingredients — Dr. Sejal Beauty

I honestly think the only one I've ever used was Cetearyl Alcohol....
That's great! Thanks for the info! I tend to avoid pretty much everything on that list. :)

Again, thank you all for the input! Very much appreciated! :)
 

Zany_in_CO

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...My grandson is 3 and has had eczema since birth. ... I did a lot of research and made a formula with emu oil and ceramides and it is actually clearing it up better than anything prescribed previously or the OTC's she is using or has tried.
That's great news! Good for you!!
My daughter, with Pemphigus foliaceus has seen minor relief from this formula, but has to continue with the steroid creams prescribed to keep it under control.
At least that's a beginning point. :thumbs:
It's a mission of love and I don't give up quickly or easily. :)
Good for you! If you were my Mom/Grandmother I would be grateful for how you look after me. 🥰
 

Quanta

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My grandson is 3 and has had eczema since birth. They didn't want to do patch tests at that age and have been managing it fairly well with OTC creams. She found Vanicream works the best to control but does not clear it up. I did a lot of research and made a formula with emu oil and ceramides and it is actually clearing it up better than anything prescribed previously or the OTC's she is using or has tried.
I didn't know he was so little. Yeah, they aren't going to do patch tests at that age. Sometimes eczema flare ups are triggered by something, and sometimes they have no obvious trigger. It depends on the type. I would definitely listen to his doctor though regarding what to use and what to avoid, since they'll know what specific type of eczema he has.

My daughter, with Pemphigus foliaceus has seen minor relief from this formula, but has to continue with the steroid creams prescribed to keep it under control. It may be that only the steroid creams and eventually chemo will help her, but I can't help trying to do anything I can. It's a mission of love and I don't give up quickly or easily. :)
To my knowledge, they do not do patch testing for Pemphigus foliaceus. At least, not that I have found.
I am unfamiliar with that condition and am not sure if it has triggers or not. I know with certain skin conditions, someone with that condition may be hypersensitive to certain things. A patch test would reveal them. If they don't do that with her condition, there may not be triggers for it. I think if you're able to find something that helps, then that's good. I have eczema flare ups occasionally, and currently I have unexplained widespread itching that the doctors are still trying to discover the cause of, so I know firsthand how unpleasant this kind of thing is. I'm glad you're trying to help your family.

Sadly, the issue I have with organic preservatives is that there isn't anything broad spectrum. Maybe someday ... sadly not yet. :(
Another problem with that type of preservative, or really anything that claims to be a natural preservative, is that you have to use a lot of it in order for it to be effective. The more of that kind of ingredient there is in a product, the more likely someone will have a reaction to it. That's why parabens are so safe. You only need the tiniest bit in order for them to do their thing, and it's such a small amount that it really doesn't affect the body. Same thing with formaldehyde releasers, unless you have an allergy to them (lucky me!) they're perfectly safe because such a small amount is needed.

That's great! Thanks for the info! I tend to avoid pretty much everything on that list. :)
Keep in mind, if you used a different preservative, you wouldn't need to avoid ethoxylated ingredients and it would open up new options in formulating.
 

Zany_in_CO

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That's why parabens are so safe. You only need the tiniest bit in order for them to do their thing, and it's such a small amount that it really doesn't affect the body.
Well said. :thumbs: I agree but there is that public perception that parabens are bad. You obviously know your preservatives. :)
 

Quanta

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Well said. :thumbs: I agree but there is that public perception that parabens are bad. You obviously know your preservatives. :)
It really irritates me that public perception can be swayed so easily by people who write popular news articles about things they don't understand, after reading a report of a study that was poorly done. The whole uproar over parabens started because someone conducted a study where parabens were found in samples of cancerous human tissue. What wasn't reported to the public was everything that was done wrong in that study. They also found parabens in blank samples that didn't contain any human tissue at all, and they never even looked at healthy tissue to compare paraben levels.

Of course, no one is writing news articles about all the studies that have been done (properly) that show parabens are safe. We literally have 100 years of data on it.
 

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Quanta has given some really good advice here in all her posts. I have fought extreme, at times life-threatening eczema since age 2. It can be brutal and so many times synthetic is safer than so-called natural. You just cannot know what the trigger is without testing which as noted they do not do on children so young, even on adults the allergen can change the next day. Also, if the triggers are Atopic triggers Allergies shots very seldom help desensitize against them. The allergy shot therapy usually helps Ashematics suffer more than eczema suffers. Fortunately for eczema, they have come out with some wonderful non-steroid ointments that work well for young children. There is also a new biologic medicine that works well but is basically unaffordable and I doubt can be used for toddlers. One member here son has one of the worst cases of eczema ever seen by doctors and she was able to get him on the new meds, hopefully, he is still on them since he is now over 18, but had a battle with insurance to help with costs. The medicine has been a miracle for her boy and given life. Sometimes we need meds not natural.

Hopefully, they find help for your Daughter, I also know nothing about her condition but will be looking it up. Due to stress, my legs broke out horrifically with lesions that I have been fighting for almost 3 yrs now trying to heal. With a new expensive high does steroid tape this last year they are finally starting to heal, which is also very expensive but my insurance helps with it.
 

Kcryss

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Quanta has given some really good advice here in all her posts. I have fought extreme, at times life-threatening eczema since age 2. It can be brutal and so many times synthetic is safer than so-called natural. You just cannot know what the trigger is without testing which as noted they do not do on children so young, even on adults the allergen can change the next day. Also, if the triggers are Atopic triggers Allergies shots very seldom help desensitize against them. The allergy shot therapy usually helps Ashematics suffer more than eczema suffers. Fortunately for eczema, they have come out with some wonderful non-steroid ointments that work well for young children. There is also a new biologic medicine that works well but is basically unaffordable and I doubt can be used for toddlers. One member here son has one of the worst cases of eczema ever seen by doctors and she was able to get him on the new meds, hopefully, he is still on them since he is now over 18, but had a battle with insurance to help with costs. The medicine has been a miracle for her boy and given life. Sometimes we need meds not natural.
Wow, that's horrible that you've had to deal with this your entire life. I'm so sorry you've had to deal with that for so long. I'm glad to hear they have new treatments for people with this condition. I suspect the little guy will be living with this his entire life as well. I was happy to see him this last weekend and discover that the cream I made is working well for him. With his formula I may stick with the liquid germall plus since I know now that it is working.

I take Rapatha and discovered that they have a discount coupon for 5 dollars. My insurance covers all but 250.00 a month, Rapatha pay's the rest minus the 5 dollars I pay. I wonder if the new biologic medicine you are referencing has something similar? Might be worth a search if you haven't already.

Hopefully, they find help for your Daughter, I also know nothing about her condition but will be looking it up. Due to stress, my legs broke out horrifically with lesions that I have been fighting for almost 3 yrs now trying to heal. With a new expensive high does steroid tape this last year they are finally starting to heal, which is also very expensive but my insurance helps with it.
It's a very rare autoimmune disease. She had it for almost a year before I told her to try National Jewish and stop visiting dermatologists. They finally did the right type of biopsy and a proper diagnosis. I wonder if the disease is not nearly as rare as they believe and just misdiagnosed as something else.
What you are describing sounds very much like what she has and they would not heal without steroids. They have her on something as well that kills the entire immune system that is helping with the breakouts. They are not as bad, but she still gets them.
 
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