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Emulsifying Wax Separating/Clumping in Final Prodct

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s007rrt

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Hello

I am having a difficult time getting my E wax to melt and not clump in my final product. My ingredients contain distilled water, black soap, glycerin, herb powder and some essential oils. After melting the E-Wax and combining the ingredients then my final product has clumps of the wax floating at the top.

I have tried reheating the wax and stirring while pouring the wax in the final mixture.
I warmed up the liquid soap when combining the wax

My final product is in a bottle and the wax is clumped at the top. I just can't figure out the issue. I have used the e wax before with a hit or miss success rate, meaning this issue has happened before. Once it melted properly and thicken the liquid soap product as intended.
Please HELP!

Thank you.
 

Obsidian

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You need your water and soap to be as hot as your melted e wax, otherwise when you pour the wax into the cooler liquids, it will solidify.
 

cmzaha

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Am I missing something here? I have never heard of using e wax to thicken liquid soap if that is what you are trying to do, or what are you trying to make?
 

DeeAnna

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I agree with Obsidian and Carolyn. And you've given us almost no information so we can provide decent advice.

The e-wax will clump if it cools before it's properly mixed, so you have to keep it sufficiently warm enough long enough and mix it in properly. How are you keeping the mixture warm enough?

And you mention stirring the product but you don't explain how you are stirring it. Are you mixing by hand? Or using a stick blender?

E-wax is an emulsifier that help water and fat mix together. From what you've told us, there is nothing for the e-wax to emulsify in this product, so it seems like there is more to this story that we don't know. Why are you using this ingredient in this particular product?
 

s007rrt

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Thank you
You need your water and soap to be as hot as your melted e wax, otherwise when you pour the wax into the cooler liquids, it will solidify.
Thank you for your feedback! It was appreciated.

I agree with Obsidian and Carolyn. And you've given us almost no information so we can provide decent advice.

The e-wax will clump if it cools before it's properly mixed, so you have to keep it sufficiently warm enough long enough and mix it in properly. How are you keeping the mixture warm enough?

And you mention stirring the product but you don't explain how you are stirring it. Are you mixing by hand? Or using a stick blender?

E-wax is an emulsifier that help water and fat mix together. From what you've told us, there is nothing for the e-wax to emulsify in this product, so it seems like there is more to this story that we don't know. Why are you using this ingredient in this particular product?
Thank you for the components that provided some feedback. I thought I provided enough information initially. However a forum allows/encourages dialogue.
I was keeping the mixture warm using double boiler method.
I was stirring with a rod and whisk.
I was using the wax to thicken the product however this material does not seem to be ideal in this application.
 

DeeAnna

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An emulsifier needs to be intimately mixed using a high-shear mixer -- a stick blender in other words. You might be able to get by with a stand mixer or countertop blender, but I honestly question whether a whisk will work well without a lot of effort.

I gather you are trying to make a liquid-type soap out of solid black soap? If so, I'd say your best bet is to use more soap to thicken the product, but I really don't know any specifics so I'm just offering some general thoughts.
 

s007rrt

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An emulsifier needs to be intimately mixed using a high-shear mixer -- a stick blender in other words. You might be able to get by with a stand mixer or countertop blender, but I honestly question whether a whisk will work well without a lot of effort.

I gather you are trying to make a liquid-type soap out of solid black soap? If so, I'd say your best bet is to use more soap to thicken the product, but I really don't know any specifics so I'm just offering some general thoughts.
Yes! I am trying to liquefy the solid black soap. I will also begin using a stick blender and incorporate more solid soap. Thank you!
 

DeeAnna

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"Liquid soap made from bar soap" often doesn't perform well in the long run. It tends to liquefy nicely and stay that way for a bit, but eventually the texture changes. The liquid often firms into a non-pourable gel but sometimes it inexplicably thins into a water-thin liquid.

I'm not sure if you have encountered this texture change as time passes -- has your experience been different?

True liquid soap is made with potassium hydroxide and this type of soap forms a more consistent and stable liquid product.
 

s007rrt

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No, I have not noticed the texture has changed as time passes from the initial texture. I haven't been able to get it to the preferred state of thickness. I will use all the suggestions provided. I also just got familiar with the salt solution as a thickener as an option.
 

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