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Does different levels of trace result in different hardening times?

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Karyn

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I've been playing with my new to me slab molds and when I 'poured' my first one I was at a fairly thick trace.

I thought I'd back off of the second slab mold so I could get a level pour into the mold. This batch was at light trace and poured really nicely.

The difference between the 2 (only made 1 day apart) on 3/3 and 3/4 is pretty noticeable. The bars poured at a thinner trace are softer and even ever so slightly darker color (no coloring added to either batch - they're natural).

This doesn't seem like it should be normal. Has anyone experienced something like this?

Thank you!
 

Dawni

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If you're sure it's the exact same recipe.... My completely non scientific guess would be that, since it's a soleseife which hardens very fast for me in general, thicker trace might mean the saponification process fast forwarded somewhat and might seem harder at the onset. The other one will catch up I'm sure.

Or maybe ambient temps were different?

Now let's wait for more knowledgeable guesses lol
 

Primrose

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Pretty sure in the back of my.mind somewhere I've read one of the soap scientists here say that pouring at emulsion can increase time to unmould
 

jcandleattic

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Thickness of trace can affect how long it takes to unmold/cut, but the end/cured result will be the same if using the same recipe/additives.
 

earlene

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I have found that sometimes additives tend to sink while the lighter trace soap sets up in the mold. That could theoretically affect the surface color of the soap.
 
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