Do You Make Your Own Mustard?

SoapMakingForum

Help Support SoapMakingForum:

Misschief

Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2015
Messages
4,044
Reaction score
6,187
Location
Kelowna, BC, Canada
I've decided to try making my own mustard using mustard seeds. Right now, I have two batches of seeds going, one with white wine, the other with Jack Daniels. I've decided to add some caramelized onions to the JD batch but I'm not sure what seasonings to add.

If you make your own, what recipe do you use? What herbs or seasonings do you put in yours? Any suggestions?
 

DeeAnna

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2013
Messages
13,469
Reaction score
19,378
Location
USA
I've been working on a honey-whiskey based recipe for a couple of years now. Finally getting close to a flavor blend we really like. The flavors of the honey and whiskey will need to be tweaked if you use Jack Daniel's or other spirit. This is a yellow mustard with dark flecks and is moderately sweet. If you want the mustard to have more kick, shorten the mellowing time. Less time at room temp = more heat.

If you use onion, be careful to keep the vinegar content reasonably high to minimize the chance of microbial growth. Speaking as someone who got food poisoning 3 times from eating someone else's tainted mustard (took me awhile to figure it out, much to my misery), it does happen and it's worth being careful about.

Dee's Honey Rye Mustard

Whole yellow mustard (Penzey's) ... 60 g
Cracked brown mustard (Penzey's) ... 20 g
Water ... 1/2 cup
Rye whiskey (Templeton) ... 1/2 cup
Apple cider vinegar (real!) ... 1/2 cup

Honey (Dee's bees) ... 1/2 cup
Turmeric (Penzey's) ... 1/2 tsp
Kosher salt ... 1/2 tsp

Mellowing time ... 3 days

Place mustard seeds, water, vinegar, and rye whiskey in a small bowl. Cover and let soak at room temperature for the mellowing time (3 days).

Stir in honey, turmeric, and salt. Transfer mustard mixture to the "twister" jar of Blendtec blender. Do not overfill the blender jar -- about 1/3 full is enough! Process until smooth enough to suit. The "whole food" juicing cycle seems to work well.

Mustard will seem too thin at first, but will tighten up with time. Transfer to an airtight container and let rest in refrigerator for 1 to 2 days before use. The mustard heat will gradually mellow with time. If the mustard gets too dry, stir in a little water to loosen. Keep refrigerated.
 

Misschief

Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2015
Messages
4,044
Reaction score
6,187
Location
Kelowna, BC, Canada
Three days... I got my seeds soaking around lunch time today and was going to make the mustard tomorrow. Might just wait until Monday now. Most of the instructions I read were anything from an hour to a few days. Thanks for the heads up about the onions, DeeAnna. That's an important issue to be aware of.

Your recipe sounds really yummy! That said, I'm not overly concerned about sweetness as I really don't care for sweet mustards but I will be adding a little honey to both. I have a feeling it will help to mellow it out a bit.

I'm really quite excited about trying this. Right now, it's really just an experiment but I keep reading that it isn't difficult and the flavour is so much better than store bought so..... why not?
 

DeeAnna

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2013
Messages
13,469
Reaction score
19,378
Location
USA
I also think the mellowing time varies a lot -- and the type of mustard (yellow, brown) also affects the heat. Here's a good article about making mustard: http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/05/...dijon-brown-spicy-yellow-hot-whole-grain.html Many recipes call for brown sugar, but I think honey tastes more mellow in my whiskey based recipe. Brown sugar added a sour tang I didn't care for and tended to dominate the whiskey flavor.
 

Misschief

Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2015
Messages
4,044
Reaction score
6,187
Location
Kelowna, BC, Canada
I ended up making three varieties and, on Saturday, my sister, BIL, daughter, grandkids, and husband had a mustard tasting. I warned them all that they were still very raw and not yet at their best. Two out of three were hits, one was something of a miss. By far, the fave was the Jack Daniels with onions caramelized in bacon fat. Second was Alton Brown's Best Mustard recipe (slightly altered as it called for sweet pickle juice and you will not find sweet pickles in this house). No one was very impressed with the white wine mustard and we're not sure why. It may be the wine I used (inexpensive) or it may just need a little something to kick it up a notch.

The best comment I got was from my husband AB's mustard, according to him, is the only one he will use on his burgers and hot dogs from now on. How's that for a confidence booster?
 

BlackDog

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2015
Messages
582
Reaction score
842
Gosh, the people on this board never cease to amaze me with all the variety of interests and skills. Who'd have thought there would be so many mustard-makers? Jacks and Jills of many trades, we are.

DeeAnna your recipe sounds delicious but I'm not sure I could spare the Templeton Rye for a condiment. I prefer it neat as opposed to on a sausage 8)
 

DeeAnna

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2013
Messages
13,469
Reaction score
19,378
Location
USA
Templeton Rye lost a lot of its Iowa-made charm when I found out last year that it's made in Indiana and is pretty much a stock whiskey that can be bought under other labels. The only thing that makes Templeton Rye different is a tish of some mysterious flavoring added to the whiskey. A "flavor profile" whatever that means. But I don't mind drinking it despite the revelations and lawsuits. And it does make a good mustard!

"...All three lawsuits brought similar claims: That Templeton Rye marketed its whiskey as “made in Iowa,” when its recipe was actually based on a stock spirit made in a Lawrenceburg, Ind., distillery. The lawsuits said the Carroll County company intentionally deceived consumers by labeling their product as a “small batch rye.”..."

From: http://www.desmoinesregister.com/st...aches-settlement-agreement-lawsuits/30109275/
More: http://www.chicagotribune.com/dining/ct-templeton-rye-settlement-20150714-story.html

I'm originally from western Iowa where people are pretty familiar with the old stories about Templeton moonshine and bootlegging the stuff into Chicago during prohibition. You can still (according to my brothers) buy moonshine out that way today if you know someone who knows someone else and know how to ask the right questions.
 

BlackDog

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2015
Messages
582
Reaction score
842
Templeton Rye lost a lot of its Iowa-made charm when I found out last year that it's made in Indiana and is pretty much a stock whiskey that can be bought under other labels. The only thing that makes Templeton Rye different is a tish of some mysterious flavoring added to the whiskey. A "flavor profile" whatever that means. But I don't mind drinking it despite the revelations and lawsuits. And it does make a good mustard!

"...All three lawsuits brought similar claims: That Templeton Rye marketed its whiskey as “made in Iowa,” when its recipe was actually based on a stock spirit made in a Lawrenceburg, Ind., distillery.
I read about this last year some time and was kind of bummed but not enough to quite drinking it heheheh!
 

TeresaT

I see you.
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
May 7, 2015
Messages
2,269
Reaction score
2,456
Location
Chatta-Vegas, TN
It's on my try list, Teresa. I love creamed horseradish and I think a horseradish mustard would be amazing on a roast beef sandwich.
Boarshead makes the most AMAZING horseradish mustard. And you're right. It is the best compliment to roast beef. Keep us posted about how your mustard turns out.

FYI: Panera Bread also has a great horsey sauce for their roast beef sandwiches, but I think that's more of a creamed horseradish thank mustard. I get their Asiago Roast Beef just for the horsey sauce!! Hmm. I've got a Panera gift card and lunch is only 3 hrs away...
 
Top