Do oils affect thickness + paste quickness question?

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Sapo

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Thread title says it all:

is there any relation between oils and thickness, without the use of thickeners - similar to bar soap hardness?

E.g. does a 100% OO LS (glycerin method) come out thicker than a 100% CO LS (glycerin method)?

P.S. Just made my first CP glyc batch (25% co, 75% oo). Reaching paste took a bit longer than with grated soap, methinks. Just an observation.

The other thing is... my stick blender was getting pretty hot so in an effort to not kill it, I switched to one of these after 15min or so: https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/31p+jtb1jIL._SX300_.jpg

I used the same "whisk" you see inserted into the handheld on the picture. That whisk seems to incorporate a ****load of air into whatever it is mixing, it doubled the volume of my mixture instantly. Quite possibly entirely by coincidence, but I'm not certain, the lye/oil mix turned into paste within a minute of using it. So my question is: does aeration affect how fast you reach paste stage?

Also, I'm gonna attempt using one of these babies on a larger batch: http://www.robertsdesigns.com.au/me...78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/r/d/rdxt108.jpg Seems like "THE" thing to use if one was crazy enough to make LS paste in a 5 gallon bucket, heh.
 

Susie

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Thread title says it all:

is there any relation between oils and thickness, without the use of thickeners - similar to bar soap hardness?

E.g. does a 100% OO LS (glycerin method) come out thicker than a 100% CO LS (glycerin method)?
The oil determines the amount of dilution water required. OO Takes less dilution water than CO.

P.S. Just made my first CP glyc batch (25% co, 75% oo). Reaching paste took a bit longer than with grated soap, methinks. Just an observation.
Yes, it does take longer. Glycerin helps speed trace, as does a bit of previously made paste or grated bar soap. You need something to kick off the reaction.

The other thing is... my stick blender was getting pretty hot so in an effort to not kill it, I switched to one of these after 15min or so: https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/31p+jtb1jIL._SX300_.jpg

I used the same "whisk" you see inserted into the handheld on the picture. That whisk seems to incorporate a ****load of air into whatever it is mixing, it doubled the volume of my mixture instantly. Quite possibly entirely by coincidence, but I'm not certain, the lye/oil mix turned into paste within a minute of using it. So my question is: does aeration affect how fast you reach paste stage?
Aeration does not affect speed of trace stage. It just adds air. You are trying to create a chemical reaction by adding the catalysts of heat and agitation.

I use a second stickblender to swap off to if I am in a hurry and do not want to wait for cool down times.

Also, I'm gonna attempt using one of these babies on a larger batch: http://www.robertsdesigns.com.au/me...78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/r/d/rdxt108.jpg Seems like "THE" thing to use if one was crazy enough to make LS paste in a 5 gallon bucket, heh.
Many soapers use those for larger NaOH recipes. Are you making large batches to sell? I ask because there are precious few people that sell liquid soap. It would be an easy way to get a leg up in this tight market.
 

Sapo

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The oil determines the amount of dilution water required. OO Takes less dilution water than CO.
Strange, thought it was the other way around... Failor:
A 100 percent coconut oil soap is still fluid at 40 percent
soap to 60 percent water, whereas an olive oil soap begins to congeal at a much lower concentration:
around 20 percent soap to 80 percent water.
But then again I'm observing that recipes with CO feel more thin.

Aeration does not affect speed of trace stage. It just adds air. You are trying to create a chemical reaction by adding the catalysts of heat and agitation.
Yeah figured it had nothing to do with it, just coincidence.

Many soapers use those for larger NaOH recipes. Are you making large batches to sell? I ask because there are precious few people that sell liquid soap. It would be an easy way to get a leg up in this tight market.
Ain't gonna lie, that's the eventual goal/idea. But first I gotta learn the ropes. On a related note, making the safety sheets or whatever you want to call them for 1 recipe with 4 different scents by a chemist totals at 430€. Just received a reply with that quote, thought I'd share it if anyone is flirting with the idea of selling.
 

topofmurrayhill

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Strange, thought it was the other way around...
Yes, it was a typo. She meant the opposite. CO takes less water and OO (more generally, oleic oils) considerably more. It's easier to make a thick soap with more oleic.
 

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