Dissolving vitamins for lotions

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So ordering things like vitamin B5 for skin and hair care formulations can get a bit spendy - I've read that vitamin c and b (all 8 of the vit b) are water soluble. So, I'm curious, if I had a high quality vitamin without fillers and I dissolved it into water and included it as my water phase for lotions and creams, would it work similarly to using these higher priced ingredients? I understand these are pure forms of the ingredient and are made specifically for creating purposes, so there is a difference, but in theory, could this work? Similarly, with oil soluble vitamins could I include them in the oil phase?

Obviously it'd require further research into which vitamins to use, but I did find a couple posts of people dissolving vitamin c and making face serums with glycerin and other ingredients and I could reformulate this to suit my needs. But I also read that the vitamin could recrystallize and be useless in the solution... So, just curious if those with more knowledge and experience than I could answer this question for me.
 

earlene

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I am curious where you can find vitamins that don't contain fillers. And of course, the question of them being suitable for cosmetic purposes is a valid concern. I'd rather rely on a product that is cosmetic-grade rather than trying to find something that is food grade, if that is what you are considering.
 
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So ordering things like vitamin B5 for skin and hair care formulations can get a bit spendy - I've read that vitamin c and b (all 8 of the vit b) are water soluble. So, I'm curious, if I had a high quality vitamin without fillers and I dissolved it into water and included it as my water phase for lotions and creams, would it work similarly to using these higher priced ingredients? I understand these are pure forms of the ingredient and are made specifically for creating purposes, so there is a difference, but in theory, could this work? Similarly, with oil soluble vitamins could I include them in the oil phase?

Obviously it'd require further research into which vitamins to use, but I did find a couple posts of people dissolving vitamin c and making face serums with glycerin and other ingredients and I could reformulate this to suit my needs. But I also read that the vitamin could recrystallize and be useless in the solution... So, just curious if those with more knowledge and experience than I could answer this question for me.
In theory, it could work. However, as Earlene mentioned, there's probably a difference between cosmetic grade and food grade. If you're planning on using tablets and grinding them, I'm pretty sure that there are going to be fillers and binders included. You'd also need to know the percentage of the ingredient in the tablet. The label may say that it's pure vitamin B5 (and I'm sure it is) but what are they using to make the tablet?

For my vitamin C serum, I purchased L-Ascorbic acid powder and make my serum as needed (a little goes a long way!), using other ingredients to make a shelf-stable product. If you're simply using the vitamin c, glycerin and a couple of other ingredients, you'll be needing to make it every couple of weeks as vitamin c deteriorates rapidly (it will turn orange, then brown, and by then it is useless).

Another consideration is cost. If you're buying the vitamins, you're also paying for the plastic bottle it comes in as well as the manufacturing costs. When you're buying the ingredient only, you know you're getting just that ingredient without the extra packaging and upcharges. To be honest, I'd rather purchase the raw ingredient, knowing that it's meant for cosmetic use, than purchasing an already made product intended for ingestion and not knowing exactly what you're getting (even if the ingredient list says it's pure niacin, or whichever).
 
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Thank you both for your input! Those are very fair considerations and probably the route I'd go - it was more for experimental purposes (see how the product works, test it, and see how customers respond to it if it's passed testing). I guess before I invest in the raw cosmetic ingredients I wanted to play around with it - of course that's IF I could find a vitamin without fillers.
 

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