Dish washing liquid soap

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Shahtura

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I am ready to make my first liquid soap and I am running out of the poisonous supermarket liquid dish washing soap so I thought to start by making a simple liquid dish washing soap.

Can somebody, please share their recipe ?

Thanks in advance.
 
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DeeAnna

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100% coconut oil
1% to 3% superfat
25% lye concentration
use all KOH (no NaOH)
Dilute carefully, but expect this soap to be runny at best.
Wear dishwashing gloves since it will be harsh to the skin.
 

Susie

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I second that recipe, but I would use 0% superfat for dishes. I also second wearing gloves. I do leave some of this as paste to put on sponges/brushes to clean the rest of the kitchen and the bathroom.
 

Shahtura

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I thank both of you very much. A dish washing soap that doesn't require wearing gloves would be preferable to me. Any suggestions?
 

Susie

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You are going to be choosing between something that actually works, but you need gloves, and something that you don't have to wear gloves with, but does not clean. Sorry. I have tried many, many different formulations to avoid wearing gloves, and the only solution I have found is to just wear gloves. It is the coconut oil that strips your hands of all natural oils. And soaps made with other oils just do not remove the oils from the dishes as well.
 

Shahtura

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Thanks Susie. Now I get it. If it doesn't dry your hands , it doesn't clean the oils from the dishes either.

Using supermarket stuff, I don't need gloves. What is its secret?

I keep asking because knowing myself, I am just not going to wear gloves anytime I need to wash a few dishes which happens a few times a day.

I do wear gloves while making soap, of course.
 

lsg

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I don't use liquid soap for my dishes because of our hard water. Instead I make my own dish washing detergent using Eco friendly surfactants. I will share a couple of recipes if you pm me.
 

DeeAnna

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Supermarket stuff is not soap; they are synthetic detergent blends. Nothing wrong with that ... just totally different from lye based soap.
 

Guspuppy

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I've been using a bar of my 100% CO, 0% superfat laundry soap as dish soap for several months now. I just rub the bar on my dish scrubby or sponge. I never wear gloves. I also wash my hands with it at the kitchen sink. Maybe it's because it's summer and very humid, and maybe because I have soft water, but it has not dried my hands at all.
Oh, this is made with NaOH, not KOH
 

Susie

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My hands won't tolerate any 100% CO soap. It does not matter if it is summer, winter, spring, fall, humid, dry, KOH, or NaOH. Maybe it is just my skin.
 

topofmurrayhill

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Thanks Susie. Now I get it. If it doesn't dry your hands , it doesn't clean the oils from the dishes either.

Using supermarket stuff, I don't need gloves. What is its secret?

I keep asking because knowing myself, I am just not going to wear gloves anytime I need to wash a few dishes which happens a few times a day.

I do wear gloves while making soap, of course.
Soap does a number of wrong things to your skin, not just remove oils. We minimize this by choice of oils and superfatting. However, when we make a strongly degreasing soap for washing dishes, we also unleash its full potential to disrupt and irritate the skin. Soap made from the shorter-chain fatty acids in coconut oil is particularly harsh on the skin.

The magic of the supermarket stuff is sometimes referred to as better living through chemistry. As crafters, we use some old-school chemistry to synthesize a type of surfactant called soap. Chemistry can also produce a range of other surfactants that work on the same principle as soap but have varying properties.

By choosing the right combination of surfactants, it's possible to create a dish cleanser that works at least as well as coconut oil soap but is gentler on the skin. It penetrates the skin less then soap, it doesn't interact with and damage proteins in the skin as much as soap, and it has a much lower pH than soap.
 

Seawolfe

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I use my 100% CO / 0%SF dish soap without gloves all the time. I dont even have dishwashing gloves... If I do a LOT of dishes it can dry my hands out, but for quick scrubs its ok. I guess it just depends on sensitivity. Dont expect as much bubbles as with your syndet soap.
 

Arimara

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My hands won't tolerate any 100% CO soap. It does not matter if it is summer, winter, spring, fall, humid, dry, KOH, or NaOH. Maybe it is just my skin.
This. When my hands are not giving me issues, I wash w/out gloves a lot. 100% coconut oil soap will at the least give me nasty hangnails and prevent me from doing my nails when I want to. I hate that because I really like to paint my nails when I can and I do my daughter's as well sometimes. So I may go back to some some soaps like Method (love the scents) or whichever soap is marketed with Olay. I'll still make 100% coconut oil liquid soap for my clothes.
 

Susie

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I do not have a dishwasher here, so all the dishes are washed by hand. I do the majority of the dish washing, although my hubby does help a LOT.
 

JayJay

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I cannot tolerate 100% CO dish soap any time of the year. Then again, my hands can't tolerate commercial dish washing liquid either.

Also be prepared that liquid soap does not produce suds like commercial dish liquid. However, I do find that liquid soap cleans better than dish washing liquid.

But since commercial liquid does not bother you, perhaps you could try a combination of both. Make a milder formula with less CO and then supplement it with synthetic detergents. Bramble Berry sells some synthetic sudsing agents.
 

kdaniels8811

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Potato water soap! I made a 0% superfat coconut oil soap and used potato water for the liquid mixed with lye. How? Boil potatoes to make mashed potatoes or potato salad. Pour off the water and save it to make soap. I weigh my water and plug the amount into a lye calculator with 100 coconut oil, 0% superfat. Make liquid soap as usual, I use a crock pot for the cook. The resulting liquid dish soap makes a ton of suds and cut grease easily on oily soap making dishes. I made a gallon which will last me a long time. I do have to wear gloves as the soap dries my hands but I like the cleaning properties better than Dawn detergent. See the picture of all the suds that foamed up while washing up from soap making.

I am assuming someone wanting to try this is familiar with liquid soapmaking so will understand how to develop a recipe. If you are looking for a natural dishsoap that really works, this is it.

suds  potato soap.jpg
 

Susie

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My soap foams that much, also. I use sugar to boost my bubbles.

I am a member of both of the liquid soapmaker Facebook groups. Could you please explain to me what potato water is supposed to do for liquid soap that sugar won't? I just have never understood.
 

JayJay

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Potato water soap! I made a 0% superfat coconut oil soap and used potato water for the liquid mixed with lye. How? Boil potatoes to make mashed potatoes or potato salad. Pour off the water and save it to make soap. I weigh my water and plug the amount into a lye calculator with 100 coconut oil, 0% superfat. Make liquid soap as usual, I use a crock pot for the cook. The resulting liquid dish soap makes a ton of suds and cut grease easily on oily soap making dishes. I made a gallon which will last me a long time. I do have to wear gloves as the soap dries my hands but I like the cleaning properties better than Dawn detergent. See the picture of all the suds that foamed up while washing up from soap making.

I am assuming someone wanting to try this is familiar with liquid soapmaking so will understand how to develop a recipe. If you are looking for a natural dishsoap that really works, this is it.
Fascinating! Thank you for sharing!
 

Soapmaker145

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I second the potato water to make more suds that you ever want. Thank you to the person who first tried it and shared the results (Kdaniels?). I made 100% coconut ls soap with potato water. I can use it as is but my next ls soap will have sunflower or rice bran to cut down on the suds. I'm finally going to get rid of the Dawn that DH uses because it suds a lot. I have a number of surfactants that I added to LS before but the potato water worked better.

I guess this is an extension of using table sugar in soap to increase bubbles. It looks like longer chain sugars work better than disaccharides. On my list of to-do tests is regular soap with sugar vs potato water.
 

biarine

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I used 100% coconut oil without superfat. I love them and I don't use gloves too. Meanwhile the supermarket dish soap it irritates my hand except of ecover dish soap but they're very expensive.
 
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