Dedicated Crock Pot for HP?

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makemineirish

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I have not made hot process soap before. It just did not interest me. I love the smooth texture and extensive design options available in cold process and have never been intrigued with the rustic appearance that comes from "cooking" soap. However, I have an idea that requires hot process.

I own a seven quart slow cooker with a stoneware crock. I have always used dedicated equipment for soaping, but cannot imagine that I will make HP part of my regular routine.

Is it advisable that I acquire a separate crock pot that can be dedicated to soaping?

If so, is there a particular size or features useful for soap making that I should keep my eye out for?

(The loaf mold that I am intending to use should require roughly 44oz of oils.)

Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
 
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redhead1226

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I would get a separate crock pot. pick one up at a garage sale or thrift store. It is best to keep all of your soapmaking equipment separate from cooking utensils. I only use mine for liquid soap as I do not do HP very often. I bought it for $10 at a thrift store ( 6 qt) and keep my other one for cooking only.
 

Susie

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I keep a dedicated soaping crock pot, also. It is not the crock that takes the damage, it is the lid. I use mine for liquid soap, as I do not make HP, but I can tell you the damage high pH does to the lid.

I have a thrift store crock pot, also, for back up. I am still using the one from 1986. They built them to last back then.
 

Arimara

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I have a 1qt crockpot exclusively for soaping. The stoneware enamel is etched so I know I would have to find a replacement soon but I also expected some wear with the equipment.
 

BrewerGeorge

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I'll go against the crowd. I've done 2 batches of HP and one batch of LS in my removable stoneware crock and still use it for food. No doubt that everyone is right about getting a dedicated one if you plan to do a lot of soaping in it, but for a one-time or experimental batch it's no big deal, IMO. Everything washes out of the stoneware and glass lid.
 

lsg

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I have a 1 quart slow cooker for small batches and an 8 qt. slow cooker for large batches. I have used the large one a couple of times for food, but usually just for soap.
 

DeeAnna

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I don't think there's any problem with using a crockpot for food and soap (not at the same time, of course!) If But Susie has a good point about the gaskets being a trouble spot. My newer crockpot has a rubber gasket around the lid, and I doubt it is lye safe. I've never used it for soap for that reason. The older crock I have that I do use for soap has a glass lid without any gasket -- that's a better choice.
 

makemineirish

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Options

I am not opposed to purchasing something at a thrift store. I just do not find it economical once you factor in the time and gas to hunt down a specific item. Craigslist, however, is entirely feasible. I have narrowed my choices down to three options IF I maintain my policy of dedicated equipment.

Option One:

I can grab this triple buffet off of CL in my neighborhood for a reasonable price. The different crock sizes might be interesting for doing different batch sizes. The obvious con is the larger size as it pertains to storage...especially when you consider that it simply won't be used that often.
Crock 1.png
https://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/st...k-slow-cooker-buffet-server-in-red/1040617992

Option Two:

I can purchase this slow cooker brand new with free shipping on Amazon for less than $40 and have some gift card credit (thus not REAL money) to burn. The pro is that it is more compact, but the con is that I would be paying full retail and need to wait for shipping.
Crock 2.png

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00JR5AAWM/?tag=skimlinks_replacement-20

Option Three:

I could simply use my current slow cooker if it is not too large. I am not that happy with it (note the disappointing reviews.) It was a gift years ago and does not have a rubber gasket. This could become my dedicated crock, and I can buy myself a nicer one for cooking. I like this idea, but worry that seven quarts might be too large for my batch size. Some basic math gives me a mold volume of 110.25 cu in, which is equivalent to 1.9 quarts (a little more than a quarter of my crock capacity).
Crock 3.png

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001CHK1Q8/?tag=skimlinks_replacement-20




 
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WeaversPort

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I got a crackpot at my local goodwill for $12. They had several in there!

But part of that was because my crackpot is aluminum :D
 

GeezLouise

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Although I like the idea of the three-pot, I wonder how easily the crocks could be grasped and pulled out.
 

Susie

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I am not opposed to purchasing something at a thrift store. I just do not find it economical once you factor in the time and gas to hunt down a specific item. Craigslist, however, is entirely feasible. I have narrowed my choices down to three options IF I maintain my policy of dedicated equipment.

Option One:

I can grab this triple buffet off of CL in my neighborhood for a reasonable price. The different crock sizes might be interesting for doing different batch sizes. The obvious con is the larger size as it pertains to storage...especially when you consider that it simply won't be used that often.
View attachment 24352
https://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/st...k-slow-cooker-buffet-server-in-red/1040617992

Option Two:

I can purchase this slow cooker brand new with free shipping on Amazon for less than $40 and have some gift card credit (thus not REAL money) to burn. The pro is that it is more compact, but the con is that I would be paying full retail and need to wait for shipping.
View attachment 24353

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00JR5AAWM/?tag=skimlinks_replacement-20

Option Three:

I could simply use my current slow cooker if it is not too large. I am not that happy with it (note the disappointing reviews.) It was a gift years ago and does not have a rubber gasket. This could become my dedicated crock, and I can buy myself a nicer one for cooking. I like this idea, but worry that seven quarts might be too large for my batch size. Some basic math gives me a mold volume of 110.25 cu in, which is equivalent to 1.9 quarts (a little more than a quarter of my crock capacity).
View attachment 24354

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001CHK1Q8/?tag=skimlinks_replacement-20




I would go for option #3, if it were me. If you don't like the current one for food, use it for soap and get a good one for food.

My soaping crock pot was a wedding gift for my brother and sister-in-law in 1986. She had a larger, better crock pot that she used for food, and was going to toss it out. I grabbed it, before I started making soap, thinking of using it to melt candle wax. It is still going strong. I did pick up a replacement for $2 at a thrift store close to my house. I told the employees what I was looking for and bribed *ahem* I mean gifted*ahem* them with soap with promises of more when I got a stick blender and/or a crock pot. It took them 2 days to find both.
 
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Steve85569

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I have two crock pots that are for soap. Just soap.

Then again I have three others that are for food.
I have been accused (wrongly) of being able to make roadkill edible with my trusty crock pots. I may have spent several years as a camp cook and kept my own secrets...
 

SunRiseArts

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I too have a separated one. You can get one at Walmart for 13 bucks. However, if this is a one time thing, and you will not use it again for soap, brewergeorge might be right. Just make sure you wash it real good by hand, and then run it through the long cycle in the dishwasher.
 
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