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Curing on metal?

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mandy318

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In browsing old posts I keep coming across the advice: don't cure on unlined metal. Why is this?

My darling husband came up with what we thought was a genius solution to cure my ever growing collection of bars (thats an old screen door we replaced)' But I think the screen is metal of some sort. Should I line this? And what makes a good liner that would also allow air flow?

Thanks in advance for any help!!

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KristaMarie

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Soap that is in contact with metal can develop DOS (dreaded orange spots, or spots that have gone rancid).

I typically leave my soaps curing on the freezer paper that the mold was lined with and rotate the soap occasionally.

I love that front, swirled soap :)
 

DeeAnna

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Some metals trigger the development of DOS (dreaded orange spots, aka oxidation or rancidity) where the soap turns a distinctive rusty orange color in spots or overall. The soap can also have a funky rancid smell if the rancidity is widespread.

If you've ever seen a lye soap that turns orange after being used at the sink, you're seeing DOS developing from exposure to water, oxygen, light, and contaminants on the hands. DOS in unused soap varies, but it's often seen as orange spots or marks where the soap contains a tiny bit of metal or has touched metal. If the oils used in a soap are oxidized, the entire bar of soap can turn orange as rancidity develops.

Copper, iron, manganese, and chromium are known to be culprits that accelerate oxidation and rancidity in fats. Since lye soap is made from fatty acids and contains small amounts of free fats and fatty acids, it's sensible to not expose your soap to these metals any more than necessary. Water and light also play a part in rancidity -- and water at least is present when soaps are young and curing out.

Bottom line -- Don't store your soap on anything metal. Even chrome plated wire racks are not good. Older used wire screen ... definitely not a good idea. One solution is to lay something non-metallic over the screen so the soap doesn't directly touch the metal.
 
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DeeAnna

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Just put a cover on it, Deedles, and your wire rack will work fine! I use old cotton towels. Other people use the thin plastic sheets that often come with those wire shelving units. Or that soft plastic drawer liner mesh that comes in rolls.
 

Susie

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Or, in the case of the screened door, one can purchase cloth screening and replace the metal. Be sure to spline it tautly to help with that sag in the center.
 

cmzaha

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I purchase large grease resistant sandwich wrapping, 1000 sheets per box, at Smart & Final and use them to cover the racks on my chrome drying rack. and come in handy for even wrapping soaps. Uncoated butcher paper is also pretty cheap and can be used, kraft paper works etc. These are cheap to use and will last quite a while as shelf liners, just throw away when they need to be changed.
 

dillsandwitch

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I have a steel shelving unit that I got cheap at the hardware store. Like the ones you find in garages and whatnot. http://www.bunnings.com.au/handy-storage-137-x-71-x-30-5cm-4-shelf-unit-_p2583029

I bought 2 as they only had 4 shelves each and when I put it together I used the shelves from both to make 1. I cure my soaps in these little baskets that I got at the cheap shop. http://mydaiso.com.au/index.php/house/light-blue-rectangle-plastic-basket.html

Each basket holds exactly 1 loaf of soap bars and I can just stick a label to the front and I know what is what and I dont have to worry about the soaps touching any of the metals. :D
 

mandy318

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I have a steel shelving unit that I got cheap at the hardware store. Like the ones you find in garages and whatnot. http://www.bunnings.com.au/handy-storage-137-x-71-x-30-5cm-4-shelf-unit-_p2583029

I bought 2 as they only had 4 shelves each and when I put it together I used the shelves from both to make 1. I cure my soaps in these little baskets that I got at the cheap shop. http://mydaiso.com.au/index.php/house/light-blue-rectangle-plastic-basket.html

Each basket holds exactly 1 loaf of soap bars and I can just stick a label to the front and I know what is what and I dont have to worry about the soaps touching any of the metals. :D
This is a great set up!
 

Susie

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I use much the same baskets to cure my soap in. They are cheap and easy to find. I stick a post-it note on the basket as a label.
 

Dahila

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Line the shelf with parchment paper and cure on it. Flip the bars ones a week;) My granddaughter loves doing it, so she does it every weekend:))
 

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