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Lina

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For my baby cp soap that is 74% olive oil how long of a cure time do you recommend?

How about if my soap is part avocado oil... 32% olive 10% avocado. Does it still need a long cure time with avocado?
 

girlishcharm2004

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I would suggest weighing it everyday until it does not lose a gram for a week before I would consider it cured.
 

Susie

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High OO soaps need a LONG time to cure. I would not even try that 74% OO soap until it had cured 6 months, regardless of weight. Much more is going on than evaporation. And I detest slimy soap.
 

Lina

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High OO soaps need a LONG time to cure. I would not even try that 74% OO soap until it had cured 6 months, regardless of weight. Much more is going on than evaporation. And I detest slimy soap.
How about the olive oil/ avocado combo does that need a long time too?
 

rparrny

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I had a similar thread about this question not that long ago and many of the science geeks gave me a lot of great info on the subject. While water loss is one aspect of cure, certain oils continue to morph and improve over time. Olive oil is one of them. The soaps that take 4-6 weeks to cure (and that includes olive oil, just at a much lower percentage), usually stop losing their water weight at about the same time.
Now I'm sure the geeks (and I say that term with the utmost love and respect) will give you more info on what oils other than olive oil need more time to morph and develop as well as percentages. What I have been doing is taking my loaf ends and cutting each one into quarters and testing them each week...I have learned a lot about the qualities of the soap and the differences in the cure...and it's just fun to try them out!:p Kinda like watching your baby take his first steps, then walk, then run...
 

Lina

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I had a similar thread about this question not that long ago and many of the science geeks gave me a lot of great info on the subject. While water loss is one aspect of cure, certain oils continue to morph and improve over time. Olive oil is one of them. The soaps that take 4-6 weeks to cure (and that includes olive oil, just at a much lower percentage), usually stop losing their water weight at about the same time.
Now I'm sure the geeks (and I say that term with the utmost love and respect) will give you more info on what oils other than olive oil need more time to morph and develop as well as percentages. What I have been doing is taking my loaf ends and cutting each one into quarters and testing them each week...I have learned a lot about the qualities of the soap and the differences in the cure...and it's just fun to try them out!:p Kinda like watching your baby take his first steps, then walk, then run...
Could you give me the link to that thread? I guess the big question is what does a bar that is not done cure feel like?
 

Susie

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Test your end pieces like rparmy said, then you will know beyond anything we can tell you. There is only so much that other people can tell you. And your actual experience will teach you way more.

If you scroll down to the bottom of this page, you will see other threads that cover the same thing your subject line mentions. That is why having a good subject line helps so very much.

I am going to give you a big hint, though...anything by DeeAnna or IrishLass is a really good explanation. I am not disrespecting anyone else, those two just happen to communicate the way I understand things best. DeeAnna has the added oomph of being a teacher and a scientist.
 
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rparrny

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Could you give me the link to that thread? I guess the big question is what does a bar that is not done cure feel like?
I'll try to find it for you, but I'm not sure it will answer all of your questions. In a very general sense, a bar that is not cured will be harsh and drying, will not lather well and will melt quickly under water. The loss of water will improve melting times, the harshness and lathering are the parts of curing that are separate from the water loss. My guess is that those factors are the results of the saponification process and the chemical interaction of the lye and the oils...if I'm wrong I'm sure someone will chime in with the correct information.
 

Lion Of Judah

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in a nutshell what it boils down to is : " there is no shortcut to good soap " , patience is the road that gets you there. once you get a chance to compare a bar of soap at 2 weeks and one that is 4-6 weeks old ( or older ) then you will see what the difference is . longer it cures [not meaning dry out ] the milder it is and the better the character.
 

Seawolfe

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I am beginning to think that a new shapers first batch should be liquid soap. That way they have some soap to use, and they don't mind giving the bar soaps a proper cure :)

Seriously, don't take our word for it, test your soap and you will see. My 100% and my 70% castiles were useable but not at all impressive at 4-6 weeks, ok at 4-6 months, fabulous at 1 year. Beer, wine and soap need time to become great.
 

penelopejane

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Could you give me the link to that thread? I guess the big question is what does a bar that is not done cure feel like?

I have some 4 day old 100% OO Castile soap. It's really slimy. My DH got burning sensation on his hands just cutting it for me. (His skin is very sensitive - next time he'll use gloves). A friend gave us 100% OO Castile at 6 months DH thought it was a useless soap. It didn't wash off easily.

It's now 18 months old (we sort of gave up on it but recently thought we should just use it up) and it's fantastic - hard, soapy, really mild on DH's skin but washes off easily and not slimy at all. I'm madly rushing around making lots so he can enjoy it in 12-18 months.

This superb soap is the reason I've started to make soap!
 
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fuzz-juzz

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I would say at least 8 weeks. I never use soap that's 6 weeks or younger. Best soap is 3 or more months old.
When it's said that soap should cure for 4-6 weeks prior to use, it's just a general guideline. It can be used after that time, but it's NOT at it's best.
It might be cured outside, but 0.5-1 cm in, it will still be soft. I tend not to weigh my soaps but will cut some random ugly ones and that is what I find after only 4-6 weeks. Cured on the outside but still not ready inside.
 

Dana89

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I think I held out a good 7 days after I made my first bar before jumping in the shower with it and I thought it felt great. I only used 1 bar and gave the others a full 6 weeks and there was a huge difference in how long they lasted and the lather was better. I still think the uncured soap got me hooked. I like it so much better than store bought.
I know though it is so hard not to use that first batch.
 

TeaLeavesandTweed

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I am beginning to think that a new shapers first batch should be liquid soap. That way they have some soap to use, and they don't mind giving the bar soaps a proper cure :)
I befriended a soap maker at our local farmers market a few years ago, so I went ahead and bought a pack of sample sized soaps from her to keep me occupied and my mind off what was on the curing rack for a month.
 

girlishcharm2004

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If you use less water is the cure time shorter?
Technically, yes. It won't have as much water to lose to begin with. Others have said that it's far from done; however, I can't say that I've looked at all the molecules under a microscope to know when it's "actually finished." I had an olive oil soap cure for over two years and it was still a slimy mess.
 

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