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Culinox Salt

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Lindsey-Star

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What purpose does this serve in a whipped soap base? Just preservation? Is it possible to swap it out for another preservative? Or is there another reason that this one is chosen?
 

DeeAnna

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It sounds like it's basically a high purity food-grade salt (sodium chloride). I doubt it's acting as a preservative, but you haven't provided much info so I'm guessing here. Whipped soap is sometimes used as a base for a facial or body scrub. Maybe that's what you're looking at? A reference to the actual recipe or product would be helpful. Care to share?
 

Lindsey-Star

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5 oz Purified or Deionized Water
5 oz Vegetable Glycerin 99.7%
3.5 oz Cocamidopropyl Betaine
8 oz Sodium Cocoyl Isethionate Powder
1 oz Stearic Acid
.5 oz Culinox Salt (NaCl)
3 g Tetrasodium EDTA

Seems like too small of an amount to be for scrubby.
 

Hendejm

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According to Morton Salt Data sheet:

Culinox® 999® Food Grade Salt is high purity, food grade granulated sodium chloride produced in vacuum pans from chemically purified brine. The crystals are cubic in structure. Brine treatment, crystallizing technique, and post-crystallizing washing substantially reduce calcium, magnesium, iron, copper and other heavy metals, sulfate and carbonate impurities. High purity helps assure consistent saltiness intensity, and there are stringent standards on visible, insoluble extraneous material. There are no additives.


The whole data sheet is here:
https://www.copecompany.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/Morton-Cullinox-Sell-Sheet.pdf

It appears to be a higher grade salt with heavy metals mostly removed ( which may make it more suitable for skin products?)

I wouldn’t think that it can be used as a preservative in whipped soap. Salt acts as a preservative only when it can absorb water so that bacteria can’t grow. I don’t think you could add enough salt to offset any water present during/after use that is remaining in the container. I’m just spit-balling here so don’t take my rant as an expert opinion. It may be that they are using salt as an exfoliant rather than a preservative....pure guess though :)
 

DeeAnna

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5 oz Purified or Deionized Water
5 oz Vegetable Glycerin 99.7%
3.5 oz Cocamidopropyl Betaine (CAPB)
8 oz Sodium Cocoyl Isethionate Powder (SCI)
1 oz Stearic Acid
.5 oz Culinox Salt (NaCl)
3 g Tetrasodium EDTA

Seems like too small of an amount to be for scrubby.
Yes, I agree with you, now that I know the formulation. The salt is going to fully dissolve in the water and thus can't possibly function as an exfoliant.

I strongly suspect the salt is being used as a thickener to make the mixture more syrupy.
 

Lindsey-Star

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[QUOTE="consistent saltiness intensity"[/QUOTE]
Relatable. ;)



I was going to use this recipe to experiment with, I just didn't want to omit anything too important.
 

DeeAnna

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You might want to make a test batch without the salt. See what the product is like -- you can always add the salt later. If you do, I suggest adding salt gradually and learn how the viscosity changes as the salt content increases. Give each addition of salt some time to react with the mixture -- there may not be an instant change. Also be aware that salt will typically increase the viscosity up to a point, and then adding more salt will start to reduce the viscosity.
 

DeeAnna

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In musing about this today, I realize I forgot in my last 2 posts that this is supposed to be a whipped product. The salt is likely needed to get the product thick enough to whip properly. But like I said in Post 7, you can make the product without salt, see what it's like, and then add salt to thicken the product to suit your needs.
 

Lindsey-Star

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In musing about this today, I realize I forgot in my last 2 posts that this is supposed to be a whipped product. The salt is likely needed to get the product thick enough to whip properly. But like I said in Post 7, you can make the product without salt, see what it's like, and then add salt to thicken the product to suit your needs.
That makes sense! Thank you!
 

Jagroop

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Yes, I agree with you, now that I know the formulation. The salt is going to fully dissolve in the water and thus can't possibly function as an exfoliant.

I strongly suspect the salt is being used as a thickener to make the mixture more syrupy.
Just one question is this the regular salt which we use in our kitchen?
 

Jagroop

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Yes, I agree with you, now that I know the formulation. The salt is going to fully dissolve in the water and thus can't possibly function as an exfoliant.

I strongly suspect the salt is being used as a thickener to make the mixture more syrupy.
I have a question is this just regular salt which we use in our kitchen?
 
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