CP Soaps - Collagen as additive?

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Rods

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Hi everyone.

Does anyone know if its possible/good idea to add collagen to CP soaps?

Will the collagen and its properties survive saponification?

Thanks in advance for your answers!
 
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I was actually wondering about this myself. I have a big tub of collagen that I add to my morning smoothies. I imagine in a leave-on product it would be too slimy/sticky. But perhaps it'd be nice for a face mask.
 

Millie

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I think proteins can add a little bubbliness and silkiness to soaps, but it won't boost the collagen in your skin. First, lye will break it down - I think it will break it down into amino acids and peptides, but wait for DeeAnna to give us the real scoop on this. It might change their structure altogether. Even if these products are beneficial to the skin, which they could be, soap is a wash off product. Best to use collagen in a leave on product for the skin (although I think there are some limitations on how this is absorbed by skin) or as a nutritional supplement.
 

Rods

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I have been asked if I could add collagen into the actual CP soap; but have not been able to find literature on the subject either on books or on the Internet.
 

DeeAnna

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According to Kevin Dunn, proteins do not break down completely to amino acids when mixed with NaOH. Some less drastic changes do occur since we know silk fiber eventually dissolves in lye solution. Ditto for the proteins in dairy. The bottom line is that proteins seem to mostly survive the soap making process with some minor changes.

The benefits of adding proteins for the soap itself? The usual thought about silk protein is that it may increase the bubbliness of the lather. Some claim it also gives the lather a silky feel. Blind testing with goat milk soap has had variable results. Some testers see no difference between goat milk soap and the same soap made without milk. When testers do claim a difference, that could be due as much from the added sugars and/or fat from the milk, since milk is more than just protein. IMO, the use of protein in soap only makes a small difference in the skin feel and lather.

The benefits of adding proteins for the skin? If collagen actually helps the skin, which is something I'm not qualified to answer, it's better used in a leave-on product, not in a wash-off product like soap. I know hydrolyzed proteins are used in conditioners, however, so ...

Try it and have fun. Nothing horrible will happen ... but I think it's fair to say there won't be any amazing benefits either.
 

Rods

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Thanks a lot for your answers.

At the end of the day, its seems that -from a cost-benefit point of view- it is not worth adding the collagen.

Regards
 
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What I did was gather wild horsetail herb dry it, and make a tea out of it to use as the water portion of my soap. Horsetail is high in collagen. However I did it for fun and label appeal, I didn't really think the collagen would benefit externally very much and tell my customers that. They still like it!
 
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According to Kevin Dunn, proteins do not break down completely to amino acids when mixed with NaOH. Some less drastic changes do occur since we know silk fiber eventually dissolves in lye solution. Ditto for the proteins in dairy. The bottom line is that proteins seem to mostly survive the soap making process with some minor changes.

The benefits of adding proteins for the soap itself? The usual thought about silk protein is that it may increase the bubbliness of the lather. Some claim it also gives the lather a silky feel. Blind testing with goat milk soap has had variable results. Some testers see no difference between goat milk soap and the same soap made without milk. When testers do claim a difference, that could be due as much from the added sugars and/or fat from the milk, since milk is more than just protein. IMO, the use of protein in soap only makes a small difference in the skin feel and lather.

The benefits of adding proteins for the skin? If collagen actually helps the skin, which is something I'm not qualified to answer, it's better used in a leave-on product, not in a wash-off product like soap. I know hydrolyzed proteins are used in conditioners, however, so ...

Try it and have fun. Nothing horrible will happen ... but I think it's fair to say there won't be any amazing benefits either.
What stage in cold process do you add it ?
 

DeeAnna

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What stage in cold process do you add it ?

Not sure - never done this and don't know anyone else who has used collagen. If it is in solid form, it will need to be rehydrated in water first. Adding stuff at trace isn't all that useful, so my guess is either use the rehydrated collagen to make the lye solution or mix it into the fats before adding the lye solution.

However you do it, be sure to include the water used with the collagen as part of the total water requirement.

Be careful resurrecting threads that are 6 years old. The Efficacious Gentleman and I happen to be around yet, but all the others are inactive. You're more likely to get more useful responses if you start a new thread to ask your question and include a link to the old thread to give people a point of reference.
 
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Not sure - never done this and don't know anyone else who has used collagen. If it is in solid form, it will need to be rehydrated in water first. Adding stuff at trace isn't all that useful, so my guess is either use the rehydrated collagen to make the lye solution or mix it into the fats before adding the lye solution.

However you do it, be sure to include the water used with the collagen as part of the total water requirement.

Be careful resurrecting threads that are 6 years old. The Efficacious Gentleman and I happen to be around yet, but all the others are inactive. You're more likely to get more useful responses if you start a new thread to ask your question and include a link to the old thread to give people a point of reference.
Sounds good . Thank you
 

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