Quantcast

Costliest soap on earth??

SoapMakingForum

Help Support SoapMakingForum:

shaan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 27, 2014
Messages
157
Reaction score
58
I was searching something when i came across this site.

http://corsilver.com/collections/facial-soaps/products/cor-signature-silver-soap-trial-size

Trial size -30grams is for $15,and lasts for 3 months. It is written on this site that it contains nano silver and silica. It is their patented formula and is supposed to make skin glow,reduce wrinkles and acne..all in one soap,and i read on other site that some Hollywood celebrities use it. Has anyone here tried it? Can you please share your experience with it? I thought that only cold process soaps can help with skin problems but this soap looks like melt and pour. Has anyone heard of more costlier and interesting soaps like this?
 

Dorymae

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 17, 2014
Messages
1,544
Reaction score
1,386
Location
Buckeye, Arizona
I've seen it before. Personally I think it is a bunch of hype. I'm certainly not going to pay 15 dollars to try it - never mind the 125 for a bar!
 

dixiedragon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2013
Messages
6,388
Reaction score
4,938
Location
Birmingham, Alabama, USA
I was searching something when i came across this site.

http://corsilver.com/collections/facial-soaps/products/cor-signature-silver-soap-trial-size

I thought that only cold process soaps can help with skin problems but this soap looks like melt and pour.
I have to object to this. While I enjoy the heck out of my homemade CP soap, it's not magic and it's not a panacea. There are people who find that MP works better for them, people who find that det bars work better, and even people who don't like soap or detergent at all and find that an oil cleansing works better for them.

That being said - I don't think that a product that sits on your face for less than 30 seconds is going to do much more than clean.
 

not_ally

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2014
Messages
2,939
Reaction score
1,686
Location
Los Angeles
So this stuff allegedly "has been shown to even out skin tone, reduce the appearance of sun spots and pore size, maintain the skin’s natural moisture factor, visibly reduce the signs of aging, and protect against the hazardous effects of the sun." I really wish FDA monitors/labeling police would focus on folks like this, who are (IMO) ripping off people who are sadly/desperately trying to stave off signs of aging with a ridiculously overpriced product.
 

dixiedragon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2013
Messages
6,388
Reaction score
4,938
Location
Birmingham, Alabama, USA
So this stuff allegedly "has been shown to even out skin tone, reduce the appearance of sun spots and pore size, maintain the skin’s natural moisture factor, visibly reduce the signs of aging, and protect against the hazardous effects of the sun." I really wish FDA monitors/labeling police would focus on folks like this, who are (IMO) ripping off people who are sadly/desperately trying to stave off signs of aging with a ridiculously overpriced product.
I think most of those claims are not things that the FDA regulates. It doesn't use term like "treat" or "cure". Honestly, I think this is "buyer beware". Honestly, I don't want to encourage the FDA to try to control and regulate inflated yet harmless claims.
 

commoncenz

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 18, 2015
Messages
595
Reaction score
758
Location
Ohio
I'm kinda with Dixie on this one. I like my CP because it is gentler on my skin as far as not drying it out. Many of my friends/family say the same. However, the only time I can say that I was amazed by what might be called "healing" properties of soap was when my son had poison ivy covering his face, arms and legs. I used a pine tar soap I had made and the poison ivy welts started drying up that night. But, it's important to note that I let the soap lather sit on him for about a good 5-10 minutes before rinsing it off.

I also have not had the opportunity to conduct an experiment to see if other soaps would have given the same results (and I'm glad of that). So, I would not/could not say that "my pine tar soap heals poison ivy welts better than any other soap".
 

Dorymae

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 17, 2014
Messages
1,544
Reaction score
1,386
Location
Buckeye, Arizona
I think most of those claims are not things that the FDA regulates. It doesn't use term like "treat" or "cure". Honestly, I think this is "buyer beware". Honestly, I don't want to encourage the FDA to try to control and regulate inflated yet harmless claims.
Although I also do not want more regulation, when they claim to reduce pore size they are walking a very fine line.

When a product only affects appearance it is cosmetic but when they claim to change the structure or function of the body it is a drug - even when it affects appearance. So to say it reduces the appearance of pores is fine but to say it reduces their size is not. Likewise you can say it reduces the appearance of wrinkles but you can not say it reduces wrinkles.

A fine line but an important one.

Edited to say I went and read the description and the way it is written it does say appearance of - so technically they are safe. They do not claim to reduce pore size.
 
Last edited:

shaan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 27, 2014
Messages
157
Reaction score
58
Correction- trial size is 10 grams only. But how can 10 grams last for 3 months?? I really want to try it after reading the reviews,but with shipping,it would be way too costly to try.
 

Latest posts

Top