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Zany_in_CO

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Time for my pain pill, elevation & ice...
FWIW, Vitamin C is the "healing vitamin".
Whenever I have surgery on the horizon, I take
1000 IU vitamin C 3 X a day, with meals...
for 3 days before the procedure and
for 1 week after the procedure. That's all.

It sounds like an excessive amount but the body takes what it needs and flushes the rest in the form of pretty bright yellow pee. LOL If you try this, you and your surgeon will be amazed at the amount of healing that takes place in a short amount of time.

I did this recently when I had a growth removed from my eyelid. The worst part was the needle injected to deaden the pain prior to the surgeon taking a scalpel and deftly lopping off the mass. Biopsy was negative. It's been five weeks now. The open wound is completely closed (without stitches) and I can barely see the scar.
 

KimW

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My mandatory pre-op CoVid test was negative, as anticipated.

My thumb joint may have had some bone removed, but I don't know for sure, since I don't remember talking to my surgeon post-op. Pre-op he said he might need to take a bit (a Wedge of bone) out. Post-op he talked to Hubby, but either he didn't say much or Hubby didn't really comprehend all of it; could be either. My pinky finger has stitches, I think, because it seemed like I could feel them yesterday when I moved the finger too much (I'm not sure how, maybe a reflex attempt to bend it when trying to exercise the adjacent fingers.)

Time for my pain pill, elevation & ice...
You chop those peppers, lady! I wouldn't have thought about trimming my nails either...
So glad your test was negative and that the surgery is done. Praying for a quick progress in recovery!
 

earlene

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FWIW, Vitamin C is the "healing vitamin".
Whenever I have surgery on the horizon, I take
1000 IU vitamin C 3 X a day, with meals...
for 3 days before the procedure and
for 1 week after the procedure. That's all.

It sounds like an excessive amount but the body takes what it needs and flushes the rest in the form of pretty bright yellow pee. LOL If you try this, you and your surgeon will be amazed at the amount of healing that takes place in a short amount of time.

I did this recently when I had a growth removed from my eyelid. The worst part was the needle injected to deaden the pain prior to the surgeon taking a scalpel and deftly lopping off the mass. Biopsy was negative. It's been five weeks now. The open wound is completely closed (without stitches) and I can barely see the scar.
High doses of vit C cause diarrhea (FMMV, but this is me), so I have to keep it to 500mg daily. I am also on an immunomodulator med, which is closely monitored, so that is another concern in my case. All my meds & OTC's are monitored, btw.
 

earlene

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Sharing here from another thread where it was being discussed:

As a (retired) nurse, let me share a few tips for future vaccinations recipients:

4 items for up-front (prior to/at time of)
  • Don't tense up. Rigid muscle during injection -> more pain. Take a few deep breaths ahead of time, meditate, whatever helps you relax, soft music, listen to/watch a comedian - aside from getting sloshed 😏
  • Bring an ice pack with you, and place it on your arm (deltoid area) for a few minutes prior to your turn for injection.
  • Avoid taking prophylactic acetaminophen, aspirin or other NSAIDs, although they can prevent/diminish some uncomfortable effects of vaccination, per recent studies on effects of NSAIDs on antibody production, may be counter-productive (link) If in doubt, contact your personal physician.
  • ASK the person who administers the vaccination if massaging the site of injection is advisable (sometimes, yes, sometime, no.)

Immediately afterward & for the next day or so:
  • Move your arm around after injection (immobility of that arm can lead to more pain.)
  • Avoid NSAIDs as indicated above until medical advice changes (contact your physician for advice as needed)
  • Warm pack at injection site periodically can help reduce pain.

Call your doctor if:
  • High fever,
  • Signs of allergic reaction: difficulty breathing, rapid heart rate, hives or rash, dizziness, sudden weakness, pallor.

If anyone else has anything to add that will help folks prepare for the vaccine, please do. I am sure I haven't thought of every helpful tip.
 

Susie

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Sharing here from another thread where it was being discussed:

As a (retired) nurse, let me share a few tips for future vaccinations recipients:

4 items for up-front (prior to/at time of)
  • Don't tense up. Rigid muscle during injection -> more pain. Take a few deep breaths ahead of time, meditate, whatever helps you relax, soft music, listen to/watch a comedian - aside from getting sloshed 😏
  • Bring an ice pack with you, and place it on your arm (deltoid area) for a few minutes prior to your turn for injection.
  • Avoid taking prophylactic acetaminophen, aspirin or other NSAIDs, although they can prevent/diminish some uncomfortable effects of vaccination, per recent studies on effects of NSAIDs on antibody production, may be counter-productive (link) If in doubt, contact your personal physician.
  • ASK the person who administers the vaccination if massaging the site of injection is advisable (sometimes, yes, sometime, no.)

Immediately afterward & for the next day or so:
  • Move your arm around after injection (immobility of that arm can lead to more pain.)
  • Avoid NSAIDs as indicated above until medical advice changes (contact your physician for advice as needed)
  • Warm pack at injection site periodically can help reduce pain.

Call your doctor if:
  • High fever,
  • Signs of allergic reaction: difficulty breathing, rapid heart rate, hives or rash, dizziness, sudden weakness, pallor.

If anyone else has anything to add that will help folks prepare for the vaccine, please do. I am sure I haven't thought of every helpful tip.
DO NOT get the second injection in the same arm as the first.
 

BattleGnome

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DO NOT get the second injection in the same arm as the first.
Any particular reason?

My second injection (Pfizer) was in the same arm and I had fewer issues than the first shot. or was I supposed to have a bigger reaction the second time?
 

earlene

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I was one of the lucky ones. No side effects, minimal soreness at injection site. Moderna in dominant arm each time. During a drive-through clinic, there's no option for which arm unless you trade seats.
 

Susie

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My husband and I got the Moderna vaccines the same week as four of my co-workers and their spouses(all of us in healthcare, all of us with other diagnoses). All of us that got it in the same arm had a miserable 2-3 days with muscle soreness everywhere, low grade fevers, malaise, fatigue, sore arms. All the rest of us who didn't had a slightly sore arm that evening.

Just wanted to give everyone a heads up, as we were warned going into the second vaccine not to get it in the same arm. And I don't recall seeing that information anywhere else.
 
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