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Daisy

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Of course. I am a retired RN; talking to my doctor is instilled in my psyche. And so is knowledge & on-going education regarding contraindications & interactions for or between meds (in any form), vitamins, supplements, herbals, etc, and I do diligent research whether or not it is prescribed. I am never empty-handed when I have a medical appointment; I always have a list of what needs to be addressed/clarified/etc. I have always been an advocate for the patient, whether it is me, my family or anyone else for whom I share interest. So I do my homework before any conversations with my docs (and afterward, as well, when something new is prescribed - I'm not one of those 'oh the doctor prescribed it, so I have full faith' types - I've seen doctors make prescribing errors, as I am sure any nurse who has worked with them has. (Everyone makes mistakes; not bashing doctors.)

In addition to that, my pharmacist and my Insurance company flag possible interactions whenever there is a change to my prescriptions and also every time a medication is renewed. The number of professionals looking at my medical stuff is remarkable.

And of course liver & kidneys are important considerations, particularly at my age and with (or without) my particular history.

But thank you for the precautions. You would have no way of knowing my medical background.
Oops! Preaching to the choir:)
I am glad you've taken it positively.
We learn from each other. I have learnt a number things from your threads.

Like now, you've posted more things to consider. Education is never wasted!
Cheers!
 

BattleGnome

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It’s hot & I live in South Florida so I only put it at the bottom of the bed but it’s awesome.
one of my weighted blankets (I have 2 of different sizes and weights) has a “keep cool” lining on one side. I can’t vouch for how well it works yet, as I live in the frozen north and bought the blanket in December. It does feel physically cooler than other blankets, so maybe it’s an option
 

earlene

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Have your husband perform the magical pill trick.
I'll ask him, but his fingers are huge. It makes me laugh just to think of him trying to do that. So round, but not scored? Mine are round but flattish, as opposed to round and longish. As in this vs this vs this:

1617737781225.png1617737908222.png1617738025553.png

Mine are like picture #1, but they are actually quite tiny. Even my thumbs next to the edges of them look very very big.

one of my weighted blankets (I have 2 of different sizes and weights) has a “keep cool” lining on one side. I can’t vouch for how well it works yet, as I live in the frozen north and bought the blanket in December. It does feel physically cooler than other blankets, so maybe it’s an option

I have wondered about 'weighted blankets' which seem to be quite a trend these day. DPS blankets or Gravity blankets have been used in therapeutic settings, but studies to show their efficacy in treating sleep disorders is minimal and inconclusive at best. Studies performed without control groups or conducted by blanket manufacturers are suspect as are studies performed without appropriate scientific criteria (which includes a control group), so the bottom line right now is there isn't enough evidence that weighted blankets are a useful tool to treat insomnia and other seep disorders.

Additionally, some published studies claim that weighted blankets are safe, which makes no sense at all. Any report or study that blatantly claims the item being studied is safe without any cautions whatsoever, is always going to be suspect. Weighted blankets are not safe in all situations or cases. There have been 2 deaths associated with the use of weighted blankets in children and there are cautions for people with chronic respiratory disorders use of them, therefore the claim of absolute safety is absurd. (links: Weighted Blanket Use: A Systematic Review - PubMed and Weighted Blankets: How They Work)

In any case, I have thought it would be interesting to try one, but I doubt I will unless someone in my family whom I go visit at some point has one & I try it while visiting. As a child, I recall piles upon piles of quilts weighing me down when visiting my grandparents; if I really want to pile on the weight while sleeping, I could do it with the blankets I already own.
 

beckster51

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I'll ask him, but his fingers are huge. It makes me laugh just to think of him trying to do that. So round, but not scored? Mine are round but flattish, as opposed to round and longish. As in this vs this vs this:

View attachment 55853View attachment 55855View attachment 55856

Mine are like picture #1, but they are actually quite tiny. Even my thumbs next to the edges of them look very very big.




I have wondered about 'weighted blankets' which seem to be quite a trend these day. DPS blankets or Gravity blankets have been used in therapeutic settings, but studies to show their efficacy in treating sleep disorders is minimal and inconclusive at best. Studies performed without control groups or conducted by blanket manufacturers are suspect as are studies performed without appropriate scientific criteria (which includes a control group), so the bottom line right now is there isn't enough evidence that weighted blankets are a useful tool to treat insomnia and other seep disorders.

Additionally, some published studies claim that weighted blankets are safe, which makes no sense at all. Any report or study that blatantly claims the item being studied is safe without any cautions whatsoever, is always going to be suspect. Weighted blankets are not safe in all situations or cases. There have been 2 deaths associated with the use of weighted blankets in children and there are cautions for people with chronic respiratory disorders use of them, therefore the claim of absolute safety is absurd. (links: Weighted Blanket Use: A Systematic Review - PubMed and Weighted Blankets: How They Work)

In any case, I have thought it would be interesting to try one, but I doubt I will unless someone in my family whom I go visit at some point has one & I try it while visiting. As a child, I recall piles upon piles of quilts weighing me down when visiting my grandparents; if I really want to pile on the weight while sleeping, I could do it with the blankets I already own.
UH OH! I guess I haven't communicated well, Earlene. They cannot lie flat against the surface that they are sitting on. They have to be rounded (convex) on their surface area, not in circumference. Does that make sense? That is why it works so well. The pressure applied to each end causes the pills to snap in the middle.
 

earlene

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UH OH! I guess I haven't communicated well, Earlene. They cannot lie flat against the surface that they are sitting on. They have to be rounded (convex) on their surface area, not in circumference. Does that make sense? That is why it works so well. The pressure applied to each end causes the pills to snap in the middle.
I see what you mean. they are too tiny for that, but they do break quite well in my pill cutter. I switched to 1/2 tab at night for the past few nights & now I don't get that grogginess.
 

earlene

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My mandatory pre-op CoVid test was negative, as anticipated.

My thumb joint may have had some bone removed, but I don't know for sure, since I don't remember talking to my surgeon post-op. Pre-op he said he might need to take a bit (a Wedge of bone) out. Post-op he talked to Hubby, but either he didn't say much or Hubby didn't really comprehend all of it; could be either. My pinky finger has stitches, I think, because it seemed like I could feel them yesterday when I moved the finger too much (I'm not sure how, maybe a reflex attempt to bend it when trying to exercise the adjacent fingers.)

My thumb, wrist & forearm are in a partial plaster cast with a partial soft cast, the finger is bandaged in gauze, then all of that & my hand is wrapped in a kind of cotton-wool & an ACE-type wrap. Hot, itchy, uncomfortable and it's only been 2 days. Two of my non-surgical fingers are bruised, but that seems to be diminishing. All look puffy this morning. Time to elevate & ice again. It's hard to elevate while sleeping; I do prior to sleeping, but the body does, what the body does, once asleep.

I realized when I awoke in recovery that I really wish I had trimmed all my fingernails prior to sugery. I won't be able to manage that at all for at least 2 months, I think. Not only will it be impossible without my dominant thumb, it will be to painful even if someone else does it for me. I guess I can only hope they don't break. I won't be able to file them either!

Thumb & finger surgery 2021April07_20210408_130506.jpg
Cutting jalapenos because I must persist.

Time for my pain pill, elevation & ice...
 

linne1gi

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My mandatory pre-op CoVid test was negative, as anticipated.

My thumb joint may have had some bone removed, but I don't know for sure, since I don't remember talking to my surgeon post-op. Pre-op he said he might need to take a bit (a Wedge of bone) out. Post-op he talked to Hubby, but either he didn't say much or Hubby didn't really comprehend all of it; could be either. My pinky finger has stitches, I think, because it seemed like I could feel them yesterday when I moved the finger too much (I'm not sure how, maybe a reflex attempt to bend it when trying to exercise the adjacent fingers.)

My thumb, wrist & forearm are in a partial plaster cast with a partial soft cast, the finger is bandaged in gauze, then all of that & my hand is wrapped in a kind of cotton-wool & an ACE-type wrap. Hot, itchy, uncomfortable and it's only been 2 days. Two of my non-surgical fingers are bruised, but that seems to be diminishing. All look puffy this morning. Time to elevate & ice again. It's hard to elevate while sleeping; I do prior to sleeping, but the body does, what the body does, once asleep.

I realized when I awoke in recovery that I really wish I had trimmed all my fingernails prior to sugery. I won't be able to manage that at all for at least 2 months, I think. Not only will it be impossible without my dominant thumb, it will be to painful even if someone else does it for me. I guess I can only hope they don't break. I won't be able to file them either!

View attachment 55916
Cutting jalapenos because I must persist.

Time for my pain pill, elevation & ice...
Hang in there, it’ll get better. I hope your recovery goes well.
 

Zany_in_CO

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Time for my pain pill, elevation & ice...
FWIW, Vitamin C is the "healing vitamin".
Whenever I have surgery on the horizon, I take
1000 IU vitamin C 3 X a day, with meals...
for 3 days before the procedure and
for 1 week after the procedure. That's all.

It sounds like an excessive amount but the body takes what it needs and flushes the rest in the form of pretty bright yellow pee. LOL If you try this, you and your surgeon will be amazed at the amount of healing that takes place in a short amount of time.

I did this recently when I had a growth removed from my eyelid. The worst part was the needle injected to deaden the pain prior to the surgeon taking a scalpel and deftly lopping off the mass. Biopsy was negative. It's been five weeks now. The open wound is completely closed (without stitches) and I can barely see the scar.
 

KimW

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My mandatory pre-op CoVid test was negative, as anticipated.

My thumb joint may have had some bone removed, but I don't know for sure, since I don't remember talking to my surgeon post-op. Pre-op he said he might need to take a bit (a Wedge of bone) out. Post-op he talked to Hubby, but either he didn't say much or Hubby didn't really comprehend all of it; could be either. My pinky finger has stitches, I think, because it seemed like I could feel them yesterday when I moved the finger too much (I'm not sure how, maybe a reflex attempt to bend it when trying to exercise the adjacent fingers.)

Time for my pain pill, elevation & ice...
You chop those peppers, lady! I wouldn't have thought about trimming my nails either...
So glad your test was negative and that the surgery is done. Praying for a quick progress in recovery!
 

earlene

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FWIW, Vitamin C is the "healing vitamin".
Whenever I have surgery on the horizon, I take
1000 IU vitamin C 3 X a day, with meals...
for 3 days before the procedure and
for 1 week after the procedure. That's all.

It sounds like an excessive amount but the body takes what it needs and flushes the rest in the form of pretty bright yellow pee. LOL If you try this, you and your surgeon will be amazed at the amount of healing that takes place in a short amount of time.

I did this recently when I had a growth removed from my eyelid. The worst part was the needle injected to deaden the pain prior to the surgeon taking a scalpel and deftly lopping off the mass. Biopsy was negative. It's been five weeks now. The open wound is completely closed (without stitches) and I can barely see the scar.
High doses of vit C cause diarrhea (FMMV, but this is me), so I have to keep it to 500mg daily. I am also on an immunomodulator med, which is closely monitored, so that is another concern in my case. All my meds & OTC's are monitored, btw.
 

earlene

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Sharing here from another thread where it was being discussed:

As a (retired) nurse, let me share a few tips for future vaccinations recipients:

4 items for up-front (prior to/at time of)
  • Don't tense up. Rigid muscle during injection -> more pain. Take a few deep breaths ahead of time, meditate, whatever helps you relax, soft music, listen to/watch a comedian - aside from getting sloshed 😏
  • Bring an ice pack with you, and place it on your arm (deltoid area) for a few minutes prior to your turn for injection.
  • Avoid taking prophylactic acetaminophen, aspirin or other NSAIDs, although they can prevent/diminish some uncomfortable effects of vaccination, per recent studies on effects of NSAIDs on antibody production, may be counter-productive (link) If in doubt, contact your personal physician.
  • ASK the person who administers the vaccination if massaging the site of injection is advisable (sometimes, yes, sometime, no.)

Immediately afterward & for the next day or so:
  • Move your arm around after injection (immobility of that arm can lead to more pain.)
  • Avoid NSAIDs as indicated above until medical advice changes (contact your physician for advice as needed)
  • Warm pack at injection site periodically can help reduce pain.

Call your doctor if:
  • High fever,
  • Signs of allergic reaction: difficulty breathing, rapid heart rate, hives or rash, dizziness, sudden weakness, pallor.

If anyone else has anything to add that will help folks prepare for the vaccine, please do. I am sure I haven't thought of every helpful tip.
 

Susie

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Sharing here from another thread where it was being discussed:

As a (retired) nurse, let me share a few tips for future vaccinations recipients:

4 items for up-front (prior to/at time of)
  • Don't tense up. Rigid muscle during injection -> more pain. Take a few deep breaths ahead of time, meditate, whatever helps you relax, soft music, listen to/watch a comedian - aside from getting sloshed 😏
  • Bring an ice pack with you, and place it on your arm (deltoid area) for a few minutes prior to your turn for injection.
  • Avoid taking prophylactic acetaminophen, aspirin or other NSAIDs, although they can prevent/diminish some uncomfortable effects of vaccination, per recent studies on effects of NSAIDs on antibody production, may be counter-productive (link) If in doubt, contact your personal physician.
  • ASK the person who administers the vaccination if massaging the site of injection is advisable (sometimes, yes, sometime, no.)

Immediately afterward & for the next day or so:
  • Move your arm around after injection (immobility of that arm can lead to more pain.)
  • Avoid NSAIDs as indicated above until medical advice changes (contact your physician for advice as needed)
  • Warm pack at injection site periodically can help reduce pain.

Call your doctor if:
  • High fever,
  • Signs of allergic reaction: difficulty breathing, rapid heart rate, hives or rash, dizziness, sudden weakness, pallor.

If anyone else has anything to add that will help folks prepare for the vaccine, please do. I am sure I haven't thought of every helpful tip.
DO NOT get the second injection in the same arm as the first.
 

BattleGnome

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DO NOT get the second injection in the same arm as the first.
Any particular reason?

My second injection (Pfizer) was in the same arm and I had fewer issues than the first shot. or was I supposed to have a bigger reaction the second time?
 

earlene

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I was one of the lucky ones. No side effects, minimal soreness at injection site. Moderna in dominant arm each time. During a drive-through clinic, there's no option for which arm unless you trade seats.
 

Susie

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My husband and I got the Moderna vaccines the same week as four of my co-workers and their spouses(all of us in healthcare, all of us with other diagnoses). All of us that got it in the same arm had a miserable 2-3 days with muscle soreness everywhere, low grade fevers, malaise, fatigue, sore arms. All the rest of us who didn't had a slightly sore arm that evening.

Just wanted to give everyone a heads up, as we were warned going into the second vaccine not to get it in the same arm. And I don't recall seeing that information anywhere else.
 
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