Convert cold process to hot?

Discussion in 'Beginners Soap Making Forum' started by badgett, Dec 15, 2015.

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  1. Dec 15, 2015 #1

    badgett

    badgett

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    Is it advisable to hot process a cold process recipe, by cooking in slow cooker?
     
  2. Dec 15, 2015 #2

    Steve85569

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    It won't hurt the product but...

    Keep a watchful eye on it.
     
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  3. Dec 15, 2015 #3

    kchaystack

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    There really is no difference between a hot process soap recipe and a cold process soap recipe.

    There are a few types of soaps that have to be done one way or another, like shaving soap (at least at this time I don't know anyone who has been able to CP shaving soap with all that stearic acid).
     
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  4. Dec 15, 2015 #4

    Arimara

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    If you wanted to hot process a cold process recipe, I would add enough liquid to bring it up to 3 parts water to 1 part lye as far as the lye solution goes to be safe. Other than all, all hot process recipes can generally be prepared by cold process (though some cold process recipes benefit greatly with a nice gel phase, especially if mostly soft oils were used.)
     
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  5. Dec 15, 2015 #5

    DeeAnna

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    Essentially HP is saponifying first and then molding, whereas CP is molding first and then saponifying.

    There is no real difference in the recipe if you're talking about most types of soap (not counting Songwind's shave soaps). The main difference is that you might want to use slightly more liquid in your HP so the soap is easier to stir and to put into the mold. I use a lye concentration of 25% to give a little more liquid.

    One tweak you can do with HP is to add the superfat after the cook is over to ensure a particular fat is the superfat. You don't have to do this -- it's just an option. Another is that you may be able to use less fragrance with HP, since fragrance is added after the cook so it won't vaporize as much. There is no difference in the cure time, however, regardless of what people say.

    So to answer your question, yes, you can HP any CP recipe and you can use a slow cooker to do it. Just use a little more liquid. Some people also put plastic food wrap over the cooker rather than just the lid to really reduce evaporation.
     
  6. Dec 15, 2015 #6

    Susie

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    Although you CAN convert CP to HP, the real question is WHY you would want to. HP needs the same 4-6 weeks cure time as CP. Don't be fooled by people on YouTube who say otherwise.
     
  7. Dec 15, 2015 #7

    badgett

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    Thanks, all. My reason was the cure time, but you have convinced me otherwise. I'm so new I'm convinced by the last advice I've had.
     
  8. Dec 15, 2015 #8

    Susie

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    Don't feel bad. We have to say the same thing at least weekly to newbies. It is good you found us. We will tell you the truth. (Whether you like what we say or not.)
     
  9. Dec 15, 2015 #9

    traderbren

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    There is a lot of conflicting info out there, but you'll get great info here! It's awesome that you accepted the tip about cure time still being 4-6 weeks without arguing, lol!
     
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  10. Dec 15, 2015 #10

    DeeAnna

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    I think a lot of soapers who claim their HP is "cured" and ready for sale in a few days are doing a lot of wishful thinking.

    I would agree the main saponification time is shorter for HP than for CP, but even most CP soap is pretty much fully saponified in a day or three days, unless you freeze the soap. If you insulate your CP soap or do a CPOP method, the saponification time ends up about the same as for HP. So the time savings gained by hot process saponification is zero to just a day or two.

    After saponification, the cure is about losing enough moisture for the soap to firm up and stabilize its weight and gradually maturing to get the best lathering and longevity. Since most people use MORE water to make HP, then HP soap actually needs MORE time to stabilize its moisture content than CP.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2015
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  11. Dec 15, 2015 #11

    dixiedragon

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    Recipe-wise, hot process and cold process are the same. Just make sure that your crockpot will safely hold your batch!

    In fact, you'll often see advice for when a CP batch starts acting up, put your batch in a crockpot and HP it.

    There are some tweaks people may choose to make to a recipe if they plan to HP it vs CPing it (such as adding sodium lactate) but none of these (to my knowledge) make a recipe unsuitable for CP. Some people choose to add SL to their CP batches also.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2015
  12. Dec 15, 2015 #12

    IrishLass

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    Many dittos all around! The only difference between CP and HP is applying extra heat...and extra water. Four to six weeks of cure time applies for both, usually a bit longer for HP than for CP because of the extra water.

    I'm one of those that also adds SL to my CP batches. It makes unmolding a breeze and also gives a creamy oopmph to my lather, much like when using milks.


    IrishLass :)
     
  13. Dec 15, 2015 #13

    Arimara

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    This can't (and probably won't) be said enough. My very first batch was hot process. It's currently number 3 on my favorite recipe list. Sure,I was able to use it almost immediately but it felt best after a two month cure. I think it could cure even longer and be a better soap. If I had left it as a cold process instead of taking extra steps, I would have had a prettier soap.

    HP soap is great if you want a rustic, homemade look but if you want to make it look pretty and smooth, cold process will save you a lot of trouble.
     
  14. Jan 16, 2020 #14

    dianaabuela1

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    Can you explain super fat, I understand that is to have a creamier soap and it's the extra that doesn't turn into soap it's the floating one's. My question is when you made a recipe in soapcal.net the superfat are included in the final recipe fats or I need to do the math separate and add the superfat.
     
  15. Jan 16, 2020 #15

    DeeAnna

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    Hi, Diana -- You are asking your question about superfat in an old thread discussing the differences between cold process and hot process soap making methods. You will get more help from more people if you start a new thread in the Beginners forum ( https://www.soapmakingforum.com/forums/47/ ) and ask your question that way.

    And welcome to the group! Introduce yourself in the Introductions forum and tell us a little about yourself.
     

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