Cold process with melt and pour glycerin

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Oregon Groves

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I made a cold process honeycomb pattern goatsmilk soap. It turned out really well. It went through a partial gel phase but overall I am happy with it. The last step I hff ave is drizzling glycerin on the top for a melted honey effect but should I wait til it cures more or do it now since I cut it?
 

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AliOop

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As @dibbles asked in your other post, do you mean "drizzling glycerin soap" -- as in melt-and-pour? Because glycerin alone is just a liquid, and will not solidify to look like honey.

Assuming you intend to drizzle M&P soap, you can do that now.
 

AliOop

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Oh, sorry...it's a M&P base glycerin
Honestly, I'm not trying to be nitpicky. But the way you are saying this, everyone will think you are talking about the liquid glycerin. What you intend to drizzle on your soap may contain glycerin, and it may be a "glycerin M&P base." But is not "M&P glycerin" nor "base glycerin."

To make sure people understand what you mean, it would be better to refer to your drizzle as M&P, or a M&P base. :)

The other important thing is not to put your soap directly on metal racks, even if they are painted or coated or claim to be stainless. The wires can get cracks or flakes that expose the soap to other metals, and that can cause DOS, which is a form of rancidity. It would be such a shame if your pretty soap went bad! You can put down freezer paper, parchment paper, or shelf liner to separate the soap from the rack.

Anyway, the honey drizzle sounds like it will look really pretty - be sure to post some pictures.
 
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linne1gi

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Honestly, I'm not trying to be nitpicky. But the way you are saying this, everyone will think you are talking about the liquid glycerin. What you intend to drizzle on your soap may contain glycerin, and it may be a "glycerin M&P base." But is not "M&P glycerin" nor "base glycerin."

To make sure people understand what you mean, it would be better to refer to your drizzle as M&P, or a M&P base. :)

The other important thing is not to put your soap directly on metal racks, even if they are painted or coated or claim to be stainless. The wires can get cracks or flakes that expose the soap to other metals, and that can cause DOS, which is a form of rancidity. It would be such a shame if your pretty soap went bad! You can put down freezer paper, parchment paper, or shelf liner to separate the soap from the rack.

Anyway, the honey drizzle sounds like it will look really pretty - be sure to post some pictures.
I have heard lately that you should not use freezer paper, or parchment paper as metal ions can migrate through these materials. The best thing to use is a light thin cloth or a thin plastic (such as needle point plastic). I took this sentence directly from an article about DOS and how to prevent them: Never cure or store soap directly touching any type of metal. If you must use metal shelving or screens, cover it with cloth or plastic to separate the soap from the metal. A layer of waxed or parchment paper is not enough -- metal ions can migrate through thin, permeable materials like these.
 

linne1gi

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I'm not sure how cloth would stop metal ions better than freezer paper?
I think a light cloth, first of all isn't see through, no light permeates it, so perhaps that is the answer? It may be the metal ions travel with light. Have to research this more.
 

linne1gi

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Wow wow wow!
I have M&P glycerin. It is transparent and white color. How can I color it into such honey looking color?
Mad Micas golden buddha is a great color - you can add it to your melt and pour, or premix it in a little glycerin (a teaspoon) or rubbing alcohol and then add it to the melt and pour. Should give you a nice honey color to drip onto your soap.
 

DeeAnna

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"...I'm not sure how cloth would stop metal ions better than freezer paper?...."

Linne is quoting me, and when I recommended cloth, I was thinking of tee shirt material, terry cloth, denim, etc. Something with some thickness to it. It works well. But if you're uncomfortable with this idea, then the plastic mesh Linne mentioned works really well too.

The very thin plastic coating on freezer paper isn't a sufficient barrier to the transfer of very small particles such as metal ions. And due to its thinness, it's fragile and prone to tiny holes and tears that you might not be able to see. If a freshly made, damp bar of soap is sitting on a single layer of freezer paper laid over a metal rack, I would be very skeptical that the plastic film on the paper would be enough of a barrier.
 

linne1gi

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"...I'm not sure how cloth would stop metal ions better than freezer paper?...."

Linne is quoting me, and when I recommended cloth, I was thinking of tee shirt material, terry cloth, denim, etc. Something with some thickness to it. It works well. But if you're uncomfortable with this idea, then the plastic mesh Linne mentioned works really well too.

The very thin plastic coating on freezer paper isn't a sufficient barrier to the transfer of very small particles such as metal ions. And due to its thinness, it's fragile and prone to tiny holes and tears that you might not be able to see. If a freshly made, damp bar of soap is sitting on a single layer of freezer paper laid over a metal rack, I would be very skeptical that the plastic film on the paper would be enough of a barrier.
Thank you for jumping in here (to save me) as I couldn't remember where I had heard not to use freezer paper. I am so careful with what I use - because of my high humidity, here in Florida. I personally bought some bar cloths from Walmart and they are easy to use - wash and reuse as necessary. And cheap as well!
 

maryloucb

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"...I'm not sure how cloth would stop metal ions better than freezer paper?...."

Linne is quoting me, and when I recommended cloth, I was thinking of tee shirt material, terry cloth, denim, etc. Something with some thickness to it. It works well. But if you're uncomfortable with this idea, then the plastic mesh Linne mentioned works really well too.

The very thin plastic coating on freezer paper isn't a sufficient barrier to the transfer of very small particles such as metal ions. And due to its thinness, it's fragile and prone to tiny holes and tears that you might not be able to see. If a freshly made, damp bar of soap is sitting on a single layer of freezer paper laid over a metal rack, I would be very skeptical that the plastic film on the paper would be enough of a barrier.
Thanks for the info. I was definitely thinking of more gauzy type of material, which I wouldn't think would be less permeable than freezer paper. Maybe plastic racks are the answer.
 
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