Churros!

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A friend invited a few of us to a Mexican themed dinner. When I asked what we could bring, she suggested Margaritas but my husband nixed that idea; the weather here is just too cold for Margaritas (in his opinion). We conferred and decided to bring homemade churros. One of the other ladies decided the same thing (she bought hers).

I still had some caramel sauce (homemade) in the fridge so I brought that along as well. Both were a hit. The hostess loved the caramel sauce so much she cleaned out the tub with a spoon!

@ShirleyHailstock asked for the recipe. For anyone else interested, here it is:

1 cup water
1/4 cup unsalted butter (or use salted and omit the salt)
1 Tbsp. granulated sugar
1/4 tsp. salt
1 cup flour
1 large egg
1/2 tsp. vanilla extract

Vegetable oil for frying

For coating:
1/2 cup granulated sugar
3/4 tsp. ground cinnamon

  1. For the coating whisk together 1/2 cup sugar and cinnamon in a shallow dish, set aside.

  2. Heat about 1 1/2 inches vegetable oil in a large pot or deep skillet over medium-high heat to 360 degrees Fahrenheit. While oil is heating prepare batter.

  3. Add water, butter, sugar and salt to a large saucepan, bring to a boil over medium-high heat.

  4. Add flour reduce heat to medium-low and cook and stir constantly with a rubber spatula until mixture comes together and is smooth (a few lumps in it are fine).

  5. Transfer mixture to a large mixing bowl, let cool 5 minutes.

  6. Add vanilla and egg to flour mixture then blend immediately with an electric mixer. Blend until mixture comes together and is smooth (it will separate at first but keep mixing; it will come together).

  7. Transfer to a 16-inch piping bag fitted with a rounded star tip (no bigger than 1/2-inch).

  8. Carefully pipe mixture into preheated oil, into about 6-inch lengths, cut end with clean scissors or pinch off with your fingers (as I did)

  9. Let fry until golden brown, about 2 minutes per side. Transfer to paper towels to dry briefly then transfer to cinnamon sugar mixture and roll to coat.

  10. Repeat process with remaining dough (frying no more than 5 at once). Serve warm with chocolate ganache or caramel sauce for dipping if desired.
From: https://www.cookingclassy.com/churros/
 
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I can't fry worth a darn. I can bake and use other cooking methods but frying is my bane.
It was for me, too. Then I realized I was always frying too hot. Now that I have a good laser thermometer, deep frying's a lot easier. Even our traditional New Year's treat, Olie Bollen (literally Oil Balls) came out better than they ever have in all the years (over 50) I've been making them.
 
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It was for me, too. Then I realized I was always frying too hot. Now that I have a good laser thermometer, deep frying's a lot easier. Even our traditional New Year's treat, Olie Bollen (literally Oil Balls) came out better than they ever have in all the years (over 50) I've been making them.
I guess I can try them sometime... like when guests are over and I have an excuse to have a can of condensed sweetened milk on the stove for a few hours.
 

Relle

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Misschief, what sort of flour do you use please, it doesn't say. Plain or Self Raising ?
 
C

Caic Tarbh

I can't fry worth a darn. I can bake and use other cooking methods but frying is my bane.

From what I understand, the biggest mistake most people make is not using a large enough pot of oil for deep frying. I'm guilty of that also, but it's not that big of a deal since I've gotten used to my own cooking (regardless of how bad it might be). My wife avoids anything that I cook because I make it too spicy (hot) for her. She says my taste buds are dead. She's probably right.
 
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A friend invited a few of us to a Mexican themed dinner. When I asked what we could bring, she suggested Margaritas but my husband nixed that idea; the weather here is just too cold for Margaritas (in his opinion). We conferred and decided to bring homemade churros. One of the other ladies decided the same thing (she bought hers).

I still had some caramel sauce (homemade) in the fridge so I brought that along as well. Both were a hit. The hostess loved the caramel sauce so much she cleaned out the tub with a spoon!

@ShirleyHailstock asked for the recipe. For anyone else interested, here it is:

1 cup water
1/4 cup unsalted butter (or use salted and omit the salt)
1 Tbsp. granulated sugar
1/4 tsp. salt
1 cup flour
1 large egg
1/2 tsp. vanilla extract

Vegetable oil for frying

For coating:
1/2 cup granulated sugar
3/4 tsp. ground cinnamon

  1. For the coating whisk together 1/2 cup sugar and cinnamon in a shallow dish, set aside.

  2. Heat about 1 1/2 inches vegetable oil in a large pot or deep skillet over medium-high heat to 360 degrees Fahrenheit. While oil is heating prepare batter.

  3. Add water, butter, sugar and salt to a large saucepan, bring to a boil over medium-high heat.

  4. Add flour reduce heat to medium-low and cook and stir constantly with a rubber spatula until mixture comes together and is smooth (a few lumps in it are fine).

  5. Transfer mixture to a large mixing bowl, let cool 5 minutes.

  6. Add vanilla and egg to flour mixture then blend immediately with an electric mixer. Blend until mixture comes together and is smooth (it will separate at first but keep mixing; it will come together).

  7. Transfer to a 16-inch piping bag fitted with a rounded star tip (no bigger than 1/2-inch).

  8. Carefully pipe mixture into preheated oil, into about 6-inch lengths, cut end with clean scissors or pinch off with your fingers (as I did)

  9. Let fry until golden brown, about 2 minutes per side. Transfer to paper towels to dry briefly then transfer to cinnamon sugar mixture and roll to coat.

  10. Repeat process with remaining dough (frying no more than 5 at once). Serve warm with chocolate ganache or caramel sauce for dipping if desired.
From: https://www.cookingclassy.com/churros/

Thank you again. I cook and this does not sound difficult. I checked the link on the bottom with the photos and I've made Churros before. They didn't last long at my house and first they're sweet and second my kids loved them. Thank you very much.
 

shunt2011

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I've made the same recipes several times. They are fairly easy to make. I made them for my parent's 60th anniversary party we had for them last year. They are always a hit.
 
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From what I understand, the biggest mistake most people make is not using a large enough pot of oil for deep frying. I'm guilty of that also, but it's not that big of a deal since I've gotten used to my own cooking (regardless of how bad it might be). My wife avoids anything that I cook because I make it too spicy (hot) for her. She says my taste buds are dead. She's probably right.
If you are well beyond scotch bonnet level tolerance, please be nicer to your wife and keep it at chipotles or jalepenos. But if she can't eat a poblano, well, I'll keep my opinion to myself there and advize gifting this chocolate bar.
 
C

Caic Tarbh

If you are well beyond scotch bonnet level tolerance, please be nicer to your wife and keep it at chipotles or jalepenos. But if she can't eat a poblano, well, I'll keep my opinion to myself there and advize gifting this chocolate bar.

I used to use habanero and scotch bonnet in my chili, but I find they impart a bit of a sweet flavor to it which I do not prefer in a chili. I found a company that supplies the Capsicum extract for the pepper spray manufacturers and convinced them to sell me a 16 oz sample bottle of it. It allows me to spice up my chili and gumbo without changing the flavor of it. I can use the more bitter peppers for flavor and then add some of the Capsicum extract to heat it up. If you dip a toothpick in it 1/8" and put that in your mouth, you'll be looking for a glass of milk, so it doesn't take much to spice up a pot of chili or gumbo. Even diluted 10:1, it is still considerably hotter than any of the commercial habanero hot sauces that I've bought from various grocery stores. Sometimes if I find a commercial hot sauce that I particularly like the flavor of, I'll use a syringe and add a ml or two of either the original Capsicum extract or the 10:1 dilution to it to spice it up a bit, depending upon the heat level I'm trying to achieve.
 
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I used to use habanero and scotch bonnet in my chili, but I find they impart a bit of a sweet flavor to it which I do not prefer in a chili. I found a company that supplies the Capsicum extract for the pepper spray manufacturers and convinced them to sell me a 16 oz sample bottle of it. It allows me to spice up my chili and gumbo without changing the flavor of it. I can use the more bitter peppers for flavor and then add some of the Capsicum extract to heat it up. If you dip a toothpick in it 1/8" and put that in your mouth, you'll be looking for a glass of milk, so it doesn't take much to spice up a pot of chili or gumbo. Even diluted 10:1, it is still considerably hotter than any of the commercial habanero hot sauces that I've bought from various grocery stores. Sometimes if I find a commercial hot sauce that I particularly like the flavor of, I'll use a syringe and add a ml or two of either the original Capsicum extract or the 10:1 dilution to it to spice it up a bit, depending upon the heat level I'm trying to achieve.
You're one of those... I think the churro recipe will be the perfect way to apologize to the lady. I do know exactly what you're talking about and I tend to like the natural flavors of peppers to come through (if they have flavor). Capsicum extract, though I can handle sauces using it, is a bit extreme.
 
C

Caic Tarbh

You're one of those... I think the churro recipe will be the perfect way to apologize to the lady. I do know exactly what you're talking about and I tend to like the natural flavors of peppers to come through (if they have flavor). Capsicum extract, though I can handle sauces using it, is a bit extreme.

Let's just say that it "has character"... :)

There's this one habanero sauce that has pretty good heat and a good taste that I discovered on one of my trips to Mexico. When I go down there, I usually try to bring back a case or two with me. I have run out, so I guess I need to make another road trip to Mexico. Last time I went down there, I rode my Harley and spent a week just riding around. When I came back through US Customs, they asked if I had anything to declare and I just said hot sauce. The guy laughed when he say that my hard saddle bags had a case of hot sauce in each side. I don't remember the name, but I recognize the brand when I see it. The heat is particularly extreme to me, but the flavor it better than any of the others that I find locally. When my wife and I go out to eat at a Mexican restaurant, I try to take a small bottle of habanero sauce (that I've spiced up a bit) with me so that I can add it to the salsa that they give us for chips and the fajitas. Of course, her bowl of salsa does not get "improved" with my sauce. Even the Wal-Mart brand of salsa is not too bad if you spice it up a bit. Many years ago, I remember a salsa that was sold in the refrigerated section of the grocery stores. I believe it was "Albert's Hot Sauce". It came in a glass jar with a thick plastic screw on type lid that did not have the paper / foil sealer, so it was a great container to keep and I would reuse it for storing own own BBQ sauces. I haven't seen it in awhile, but it would be good if spiced up a bit with some of my hot sauce.
 

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