Can't get decent scent throw from fragrance or essential oils!

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newscents

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Hi all,

Really hoping the hive mind can help me with HT problems. I started making candles a couple of months ago and still haven't been able to get any scent throw out of them. I started by using soy wax with essential oils and then tried fragrance oils instead (as I'd read that it's easier to get HT using fragrance oils). These had a decent cold throw and seemed to be wicked well (good melt pool size, no mushroom-ing or flickering etc.) but gave off no smell when I lit them and waited for a few hours. I tried again with different fragrance loads and using different suppliers but had the same problem.

Since then, I've tried different vegetable waxes. I've tried coconut, rapeseed and blends (soy/coconut/rapeseed) and always have the same problem. I've also tried each of these with different fragrance loads, wicks, jars etc. I've tried melting and mixing at different temps too. I've also burned them in different sized rooms (some small, some large). They just barely ever give off a smell - if I get any smell out of them, it's usually just a burning / fuel smell.

A limitation which I may have is that I have an electric hob, so I can't get the waxes beyond a certain temperature (max around 80 degrees C), but it's hot enough that they can all melt fully.


Does anyone have any tips or any clue what might be happening here?

Thanks for any help :)
 

Quanta

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How long are you curing your candles before you burn them?

Have you tried paraffin wax, or a paraffin blend? Paraffin usually gives much better scent throw because it burns faster than vegetable wax.
 

newscents

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I did a little research on google and came up with this.
Thank you! I definitely want to try essential oils in candles again and this is reassuring to read. Just feel like I need to get fragrance oils right first as it looks like they're easier to handle (apparently not in my case, lol).


How long are you curing your candles before you burn them?

Have you tried paraffin wax, or a paraffin blend? Paraffin usually gives much better scent throw because it burns faster than vegetable wax.
Curing time has varied, but I typically wait around 4 days to 1 week before lighting for the first time. I then wait another few days to use it a second time around. Do you think I should wait longer than that? I guess patience is a virtue...

I haven't used paraffin or a paraffin blend as some people in the house have particularly bad asthma and apparently paraffin can be more harmful for them (plus there's the environmental impact). A blend might be an option worth me exploring though - do you have any recommendations?



In case any more info is useful, my latest test batch used three types of candles:

1. 2 x candles made using coconut wax. These were heated to around 75C. One was mixed at 60C and poured at 58. The other was mixed at 70C and poured at 56C.
2. 2 x candles made using a coconut & rapeseed wax. Both were heated to 78C. One was mixed at 60C and poured at 52C. The other was mixed at 70C and poured at 65C.
3. 2 x candles made using a soy & coconut wax. Both were heated to 80C. One was mixed at 60C and poured at 55C. The other was mixed at 70C and poured at 65C.

All of these candles were made using a CD8 (Stabilo 8 wick) in a jar with 2.2" diameter. They all had a fragrance load of 9.5% using 2 different FO's (bought from 2 different suppliers). Pretty much all of them had a great CT and decent appearance, but none have a HT (some a mild burning smell).
 
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@newscents ,
Some suggestions.
1) Soy wax needs to be heated to 185 F before you add the scent
2) Make sure your fragrances are meant for candle making and come from a reputable candle supply vendor. If you like strong fragrance scent, use the maximum recommended load.
3) A soy candle needs to cure for at least 2 weeks, before it will give a decent hot throw (HT).
4) When testing the HT, put the candle in a safe burning location; light it; leave the room for 10 minutes; return and see if you smell the fragrance.
 

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