candle tins 8 oz

Discussion in 'Candle Making Forum' started by sallyb86, Sep 15, 2016.

  1. Sep 15, 2016 #1

    sallyb86

    sallyb86

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    Hi,
    I'm looking at making candles for my wedding favours and would love some advice. I have looked for resources online but would love some help please. I'm trying to decide between 6 oz and 8 oz seamless tin and I think I will go with the 8 as the 6 might be to small? is 8 ounce a common size to use? How do i work out the fill line for the candle tin? how much wax would I need to make 96 tins? how do I figure out the essential oil to wax ratio? I was going to use the GW-464 wax.
    Any advice would be so appreciated. Thank you.
     
  2. Sep 15, 2016 #2

    TBandCW

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  3. Sep 16, 2016 #3

    McMomWV

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    I just made 130 8-oz tin candles for my step daughters wedding. I bought the tins from candle science and poured 4.8 oz of wax into each. There is a line around the tin that holds the lid. I used that as the pour to line.
    You will probably use about 29 pounds of wax. I use 1.5 ounces of fragrance oil per pound of wax. Depending on scent throw, you can use as little as one ounce per pound of wax. Make a test candle and burn it to see if you are happy with the scent throw.
    The candles were a big hit. Good luck and congratulations.
     
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  4. Sep 16, 2016 #4

    HappyGoNaturally

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    Last edited: Sep 16, 2016
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  5. Sep 16, 2016 #5

    TBandCW

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    Don't forget to check on the wick size too!
     
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  6. Sep 16, 2016 #6

    HappyGoNaturally

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    What would you use in those?

    I haven't made or test burned any soy containers in tins, only glass.
    Cotton square braid has been working nicely for me; for a 3" candle, I'd use a #2 if I was pouring into a jar.
    I'm wondering if there is a difference in burning in a metal container since I've never done it!
    I guess I'd better pour myself a candle in a can to see how I like it, as I've been thinking about purchasing some 4 or 6 oz. seamless tins!

    I read a nice post somewhere here, I'm sorry I don't have the link, but it was so well-said about using diffusers for essential oils and to use fragrance oils for candles. I agree with that opinion, as the f/o's are designed for burning, whereas e/o's aren't really.
     
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  7. Sep 16, 2016 #7

    topofmurrayhill

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    Don't try to use EOs as candle fragrances. Use a fragrance oil. 1.5 oz ppw (about 9%) is a typical usage rate for soy wax, which can have less throw than paraffin-based blends.

    Testing is important before you make a lot of these or give any away.

    Be sure to make testers with different wick sizes and burn them to the bottom, to make sure the candles you make work properly and are safe. Burn about 3 hours per session, maybe 2x per day with time to cool off completely. Get the wick sizes in small quantities until you figure out what size you need.

    You generally don't need a full melt pool (wax melting out to the sides) on the first burn, and certainly not a deep one. You only want any wax hung up on the sides to melt by the time the candle is completely burned, but this is actually easy with tins because the metal conducts heat so well.

    The easiest mistake to make with tins is over-wicking. A distinguishing feature of tins versus jars is that they can get very hot and sooty at the bottom. The wick that seems perfect at first is almost certainly too big, so it's important to test all the way down. This applies to jars too, but it's more dramatic with tins.

    You will want to use pre-tabbed wicks for this project. Personally I would go with CD wicks (not CDN!), which are available from Lone Star, Nature's Garden and others.
     
  8. Sep 16, 2016 #8

    HappyGoNaturally

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    Since SallyB hasn't come back yet, I hope no one will mind any of my input or questions in this topic, but since I've been considering getting some metal containers to make as gifts, this topic is interesting to me. I was thinking that the metal container is going to heat up more than glass, as a matter of fact, a few days ago, I found a 3" tin and secured a CD-10 in the bottom of it with a plan to pour it this weekend.

    For a container that is 3"+ diameter, I think this would be the right size, except for that I'm not sure in regard to a metal container. I just got these in last week and I've never burned CD's before, so this will be interesting for me!

    I'd like to add that the comment regarding when the wax gets to the bottom there are concerns, that perhaps purchasing wicks with a longer tab stem would be safer. I normally buy my wicking and tab it/wax it myself for custom lengths, but there is the convenience factor of pre-tabbed/waxed wicks -- the CD's I bought are tabbed/waxed, although I'm not sure if they were waxed in soy or not -- doesn't matter much to me though at this point. After I test burn (when weather cools down), I'll post.

    I'm also curious as to why people are preferring the GW464 to the GW444? From what I understand, the latter holds more scent, with the 464 having better adhesion, yet with tins, that doesn't matter so much, as you're not going to see any wet-spots, etc.

    Quote: "The easiest mistake to make with tins is over-wicking."

    A very good thing to know, imo!!
    :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2016
  9. Sep 17, 2016 #9

    topofmurrayhill

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    Although various factors can change it, I find that CD 8 typically works well in a 3" glass container of typical thickness with 125 MP soy wax. This is based on a wick that burns cleanly, uses all the wax, and doesn't require any manual trimming. But with the same wax and fragrance it would probably still be a little inferno for the final burns of an 8 oz (3") tin. You will want to see some wax hang up on the sides -- it will definitely clean up by the end.
     
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  10. Sep 17, 2016 #10

    HappyGoNaturally

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    It'll be interesting for me to test a CD wick -- I see in some recommendations that a CD-8 is noted for a 2.5-3" and a CD-10 for a 3-3.5". If you're to "wick down" for tins, I think perhaps the CD-10's I got might be a little too much for a 3" (2-7/8") tin.

    I see that the GW444 is a 119-125 mp; the GW464 is a 113-119 mp -- so maybe either a CD-8 or 10 could be alright for GW444; but, my guess, based on some of the information you've provided, is that possibly in a 2-7/8" metal container a CD-7 might be a safer option ...? It's recommended for approx. 2.25 - 2.5" containers, but the wicking guidelines never mention anything about metal containers possibly requiring a smaller wick.

    Test-burning, as has been mentioned, is not an option -- it's a must!
     
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  11. Sep 17, 2016 #11

    topofmurrayhill

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    Yes, it's a must for any candles that will leave your hands, and for those you want to really enjoy.

    I've seen a LOT of wicking guidelines and they are lucky to get in the ballpark. The issue with tins is/was common knowledge that is never included in supplier recommendations. Much is forgotten when a crafting community fragments into FB groups. SMF is lucky to still be here and active.

    You will never learn more about candlemaking than going to CraftServer and reading through all the old posts. Nothing new has been learned that isn't on that forum.

    Yes, my first guess would be a CD 7 but there's not a huge difference between 7 and 8. All that matters is your testing. You won't know for sure until the end.

    Here is how good soy candles end their life, with no hangup, soot or excessive mushrooming. This is CD 8 in a normal 3 inch tumbler and CD 10 in a 3 inch square tumbler with thick glass.
     

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  12. Sep 18, 2016 #12

    TBandCW

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    Now that's how a candle should look when done! :thumbup:
     
  13. Sep 18, 2016 #13

    HappyGoNaturally

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    Yes, nice! I've got a 3-inch tumbler, I think I'll try the CD-10 and see how that goes.

    I've been doing some repours for a nearby friend -- the first time she brought me her jars, some were cleaned, but some hadn't been and they were rather sooty. These were store bought soy candles and not cheap ones either. She's told me that she & her husband think the repours are nicer than the originals. It makes you feel nice to do that, but on the other hand, it's sad how much money some of the designer candles cost and they are not always of quality. One thing is for sure -- they looked nothing like the photos shared here!!
     
  14. Sep 20, 2016 #14

    sallyb86

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    Thank you so much. I have been busy and disconnected with the internet this last week. I think I will have to try first, I didn't think of this. The wick size i'm sure is easy to figure out what size to buy? And i'll have to look and see if I purchased EO or FO. The person I contacted mentioned I need to roughly double my quantity of wax as when melted it halves. So do I measure the quantity of FO with the weight of wax flakes? Thank you for you help.
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2016
  15. Sep 20, 2016 #15

    sallyb86

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    Thank you for your help, that has helped answer a lot of my questions. I was undecided with using the 8 or 6 ounce. Im assuming this is the 8? and was it a nice size. I want to purchase in large quantities as its cheaper. I'm a big candle burner at home, and I thought this would be a nice project.
     
  16. Sep 20, 2016 #16

    sallyb86

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    Thank you all so much for your help. I think I need to definitely make and test first. I'm also making candles for table decorations (nice natural mosquito repellents) as its a out door wedding. These are in glass tumblers. I purchased embossed coloured tumblers for these as I liked the design. Would these work? They are thick solid glass. I was initially worried they would crack under heat, but now reading with the right wick size and the safe amount of wax I'm hoping it will be fine. Can anyone suggest a scent that they have loved. I have been ordering samples and samples and Im still undecided yet. Its a outdoor wedding, I wasn't sure if I should just stick with a vanilla bean for the candle gifts. Thanks again everyone!
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2016
  17. Sep 21, 2016 #17

    Chefmom

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    If you are making candles that will be burned at the wedding on the table while people are eating you don't want them to be fragranced. Candle fragrances can really throw off your senses when you eat and can also make some people sick. A take away candle can be fragranced, like a wedding favor or something, but stick to no fragrance on a table with lots of guests and especially food.
     
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  18. Sep 22, 2016 #18

    TBandCW

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    Soy wax burns very cool so I don't think you'd have an issue with heat.
    Go for a light scent for the tables or don't put much scent in. Maybe lemongrass? You can also color them in the wedding colors! For the gifts vanilla sounds like a good choice. That is the #1 fragrance in the U.S.
     
  19. Sep 23, 2016 #19

    HappyGoNaturally

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    I agree that outdoor candles on a table setting probably shouldn't be scented -- an outdoor situation is kind of waste of scent except for the people sitting up close and some may not prefer the scent. I was talking with a candle customer today and she was telling me how she can't stand vanilla scents -- I told her I'm not crazy about it, but I don't mind it with caramel. So, I guess what I'm saying is that even though something may be "popular," it doesn't mean everyone is going to like it. The other thing I'd like to mention about candles outdoors, is that you really need to be considerate of the additional hazards. For instance, if there are paper table cloths or other items, they need to be taped down so they can't blow over the candles, etc.
     
  20. Sep 25, 2016 #20

    sallyb86

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    Lemon grass was what I was thinking. It's not a traditional sit down wedding with seating. I was going to use low scent for those reasons of being overpowering, but I need something to keep the mosquitos at bay (summer in Australia they are hungry then) I thought 1 in every three would have a scent. I have definately considered outdoor dangers, I think it will be ok, no material tablecloths just coffee tables, and timber surfaces. (Lounge seating in the garden). Thanks for all your advice. I agree I don't normally but vanilla, I'm more or a lime and coconut type of Person, I was trying to stick with something popular. Not everyone will like the same thing.
     

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