Can you use diffuser oils in soap?

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KirstyJay

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The question is in the thread really... I can readily get hold of oils in many different scents for oil diffusers, but it's a lot more difficult to get fragrance oils or essential oils where I live. Would it make a difference using diffuser oils?
 

Millie

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No, you need something that is skin safe and formulated to work in soap.
 

DeeAnna

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Some scents that are sold for use in diffusers may also be skin-safe and could be used in soap. You have to get information from the supplier to know however. If a scent is not specifically labeled as skin safe, I would not be comfortable using in soap or other products put on the skin.

IFRA guidelines give the best information about these restrictions. Here's an example -- Cracklin' Birch sold by Nature's Garden, https://www.naturesgardencandles.com/cracklin-birch-fragrance-oil If you scroll down this listing, look on the right hand side for "Fragrance Oil IFRA Certificate" and click on that link to see how Cracklin' Birch can be used in various products --

IFRA category 9 is for soap. Cracklin' Birch is safe to use in soap at up to 5.7%.

IFRA category 11 is for non-skin use including air fresheners and diffusers. Cracklin' Birch is safe at "no restriction" (100%) for Cat 11 products.
Remember that IFRA guidelines are only about what's safe for the consumer, not what is sensible for use in a given product.

The IFRA guidelines for "Raspberry Bling Bling" tell you it can use it in soap as high as 30%, but this much fragrance in soap would probably make your soap a soupy mess. You still want to be a sensible soap maker and use it at a percentage that makes good soap. https://www.naturesgardencandles.com/blackberry-bling-bling-fragrance-oil

The guidelines for "Apple Pie" fragrance severely restrict it to 1% for Cat 9 but list it at "no restriction" for Cat 11. I wouldn't bother to use a fragrance like this in soap with such a low restriction. IMO it's best used in a diffuser or other non-skin product. https://www.naturesgardencandles.com/apple-pie-fragrance-oil
 

KirstyJay

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Thanks for the great explanation, but I assume the IFRA is an american authority? I live in Spain, more particularly in the Canary Islands, and import of anything here is limited. Stuff that does get here is usually taxed heavily or has huge transport costs, so sourcing fragrances and oils is **** near impossible. I'm going to assume that the diffuser oils I have found will not be suitable unless I get information to the contrary! Pity really, as they are quite nice. I may have to wait until I go to see my mum at Xmas in the UK to stock up. :)

EDIT: Just looked them up... IFRA = International Fragrance Authority. I'll look further into this. Thanks.
 

LilyJo

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There are loads of uk fragrance suppliers so getting a batch delivered to mum in the uk would be a good idea. But I think lots of them source from Europe so you may be able to get some more locally.
 

DeeAnna

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I should have been more clear about IFRA. Yes, it is an international organization. The guidelines I mentioned in my previous post are just that - guidelines -- but the guidelines represent a lot of homework to determine whether the fragrances are safe and in what amounts, so they're worth paying attention to.

Google tells me IFRA is headquartered in Nigeria -- definitely not a US or even a North American institution. Their website: https://ifrafragrance.org/

As best I can tell, the best source for the IFRA guidelines for a particular fragrance is the supplier of the scent. I have gotten the impression that access to the full IFRA database is a paid or otherwise restricted service -- I don't think a person can go to the IFRA website and look up the guidelines for that fragrance for free. Or at least I haven't been able to figure out how that can be done.
 

KirstyJay

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There are loads of uk fragrance suppliers so getting a batch delivered to mum in the uk would be a good idea. But I think lots of them source from Europe so you may be able to get some more locally.
Ironically, it's easier (and often cheaper) to get stuff sent to the UK than it is to get it delivered here! Maybe that will change after Brexit, but I doubt it. :D
 
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