Can accelerating FO scorch GM or cause DOS?

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I made GMS the day before yesterday. I divided the batter into two batches because I planned to use two different FOs, both brand new from Candle Science: “Rose Petals” and “French Lilac.” I read their reviews on the CS website so I knew they would accelerate and tried to plan accordingly. I used the Lilac at 3% and the Rose at 6% since those were CS’s recommended usage rates. Before all that I made my GM lye solution in an ice bath and ensured the temps did not exceed 84 F. I mixed that with a mini blender after the frozen GM dissolved. I then added my completely pre-dissolved Na Gluconate and Sorbitol to the lye solution and mixed thoroughly. Once that was done I added to my warm oils (103 F) and SB’d to emulsion. At that point I split the batter into two batches and added my colorants (Nurture Soap mica). I hand stirred the French Lilac to one batch and immediately poured into individual cavity molds. The batter thickened rapidly and was pretty gloppy by the end. I repeated the process for the other batch with the Rose Petals and it poured more easily, and was not as gloppy by the end of the pour. Amazingly (for me), I was able to unmold both batches after 4 hours and put them on my curing shelf. The next day I saw orange speckles on the Lilac batch. The Rose batch was fine and it smelled likes roses. The lilac batch doesn’t smell like lilac at all. In fact, it’s a bit unpleasant. So my question is, is it possible that the lilac FO scorched the GM and that’s what caused the orange speckles and off odor? Could it possibly be DOS? I also made two soy candles using the lilac and they do indeed smell like lilac. The hearts are the suspect soaps. The flower is the rose soap that turned out very nicely.
 

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You mentioned that you split the batches before you colored them. Is it possible that the mica in the heart batch didn't get mixed in as well? Some of the darker/red-toned bits look like mica specks to me. The lighter/yellower ones look like unmixed FO. Whatever they are, they don't look bad at all - kind of pretty, actually.

You might give the lilac soap some time to see if the scent comes back. Due to the highly alkaline environment created by the lye solution, scent behavior in soap can be very than it is in candles. I've had some soaps that smell terrible at first but become better after a few weeks. I've also had some that smell like nothing at all unless they are in use.
 
You mentioned that you split the batches before you colored them. Is it possible that the mica in the heart batch didn't get mixed in as well? Some of the darker/red-toned bits look like mica specks to me. The lighter/yellower ones look like unmixed FO. Whatever they are, they don't look bad at all - kind of pretty, actually.

You might give the lilac soap some time to see if the scent comes back. Due to the highly alkaline environment created by the lye solution, scent behavior in soap can be very than it is in candles. I've had some soaps that smell terrible at first but become better after a few weeks. I've also had some that smell like nothing at all unless they are in use.
Thank you so much for your valuable input, Ali . Yes, the red bits are mica. I originally dispersed the mica I was using in a small portion of my warm oils, using a mini mixer. Once I added that to the main oils, I wasn’t happy with the resultant shade so added additional mica powder directly to the pitcher of batter. I didn’t thoroughly blend it because I didn’t want to thicken the emulsion I had achieved since I was working with a known accelerating FO. As for the yellow specks, wouldn’t they feel oily? Or wipe off?
 
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Thank you so much for your valuable input, Ali . Yes, the red bits are mica. I originally dispersed the mica I was using in a small portion of my warm oils, using a mini mixer. Once I added that to the main oils, I wasn’t happy with the resultant shade so added additional mica powder directly to the pitcher of batter. I didn’t thoroughly blend it because I didn’t want to thicken the emulsion I had achieved since I was working with a known accelerating FO. As for the yellow specks, wouldn’t they feel oily? Or wipe off?
Not necessarily. Sometimes there is just enough to leave those yellow-y spots without actually feeling oily. And sometimes those spots will reabsorb over time. But even if they don't, these bars turned out so pretty. I hope your lilac scent comes back!
 
I agree, they look great to me!
If I need to mix extra additives into fast tracing soap, I'll scoop some soap out and mix that with the additives on the side. Less chance of seizing the whole batch up. When that's mixed, put in another couple of spoonfuls of soap and mix that in also. Then it will mix easily back into the batter w/o having to use the blender. It's also good to have a few nylon micro 400 mesh sieves around (you can get them cheap on Amazon). You can smash your mixed color and soap through one and it will help catch any unmixed bits.
Fingers crossed the smell comes back as it cures. GM soaps can smell off for a while in the beginning. I usually soap mine (lye and oils) in the mid 80's F, I don't know if that would make a difference with accelerating micas and FOs, since I don't use them, maybe someone else knows that?
My logs then go in the freezer and my molds go in the fridge.
I also read somewhere about curing them with a cotton ball soaked in the scent close by?
 
I agree, they look great to me!
If I need to mix extra additives into fast tracing soap, I'll scoop some soap out and mix that with the additives on the side. Less chance of seizing the whole batch up. When that's mixed, put in another couple of spoonfuls of soap and mix that in also. Then it will mix easily back into the batter w/o having to use the blender. It's also good to have a few nylon micro 400 mesh sieves around (you can get them cheap on Amazon). You can smash your mixed color and soap through one and it will help catch any unmixed bits.
Fingers crossed the smell comes back as it cures. GM soaps can smell off for a while in the beginning. I usually soap mine (lye and oils) in the mid 80's F, I don't know if that would make a difference with accelerating micas and FOs, since I don't use them, maybe someone else knows that?
My logs then go in the freezer and my molds go in the fridge.
I also read somewhere about curing them with a cotton ball soaked in the scent close by?
Thank you, ToniO! That’s a great idea about taking out a bit of batter to mix extra colorant and I’ll have to try the cotton ball thing.
I am also happy to report that, as of this morning, the Lilac scent is beginning to emerge ever so faintly.
 
Thank you, ToniO! That’s a great idea about taking out a bit of batter to mix extra colorant and I’ll have to try the cotton ball thing.
I am also happy to report that, as of this morning, the Lilac scent is beginning to emerge ever so faintly.
You're welcome! It's what I do with baking. A lot of the same principles apply. I guess we apply soap knowledge to baking and get some really cool swirls, etc. in cake batter also, huh? That would look cool...🤔
 
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