Calculating the Ingredients in Finished Soap

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thinnestslice

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I've tried a variety of searches but can't find the answer to this question. If someone can point me in the right direction I would very much appreciate it.

Is there a calculator that anyone knows about that will show you your final soap composition after the ingredients have been saponified? If not, how does one calculate or determine what the ingredient list in a finished soap will be for purposes of accurate labeling? My understanding is that certain jurisdictions require that the labelling shows the ingredients that you finish with - not start with. Are there widely used references for this?

For example if one mixes lye with tallow, the result would at least include sodium tallowate. But are there other by-products that are created as well? Will there be the same amount of sodium tallowate after saponification as there was tallow before saponification? What if you are using both sodium hydroxide and potassium hydroxide in different amounts?
 
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sistrum

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If you use the INCI terms that is all you need to do. They include the soap part and what ever is left over.
 

nebetmiw

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You are getting over worried here. Just list ingredients in order from max to least amounts. You can do the soapified version or not. A typical label looks like this: Olive oil, Coconut Oil, castor oil, distilled water, EO's lavender and orange, mica color. HTH
 

judymoody

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I do the same, list my ingredients in order of weight from the beginning of the soapmaking process. It's like baked goods - your cake label will list flour, eggs, milk, etc., not "cake."
 

thinnestslice

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Thanks for your replies. I'm not worried about it. I'm just really interested in knowing what the final composition of a recipe will be for my own understanding of how ingredients change when they are saponified.

I wonder if anyone puts out a calculator for this or if it could be done?
 

jcandleattic

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Thanks for your replies. I'm not worried about it. I'm just really interested in knowing what the final composition of a recipe will be for my own understanding of how ingredients change when they are saponified.

I wonder if anyone puts out a calculator for this or if it could be done?
I guess I don't understand what it is you are asking. :Kitten Love:
If you use the INCI names of the ingredients you used, then that is the final composition of the recipe. The amounts will still remain, just the saponoified names of the oils will change because they have reacted to the lye which in turn will make the lye inactive and doesn't need to be listed.
 

DWinMadison

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I think the people who list the sopanified ingredients often do so in order to avoid having to list things like lard, NaOH, sodium hydroxide or the dreaded "lye" as an ingredient. Which begs the question, can you list the chemical compound "NaOH" in the ingredients instead of "sodium hydroxide" and still meet the regs? It sure would save space on the label, and seem less intimidating?
 

squeakycleanuk

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Thanks for your replies. I'm not worried about it. I'm just really interested in knowing what the final composition of a recipe will be for my own understanding of how ingredients change when they are saponified.

I wonder if anyone puts out a calculator for this or if it could be done?
I think from what I've read that it is pretty impossible to know 'exactly' what is in the final product as the saponification of the fats etc will be different (slightly) with each batch due to varying factors. As I've heard people say that you can't predict which fats the lye will use up in terms of superfatting. So if thats the case, then any kind of calculator would only be able to estimate anyway. I'm new to this so could be wrong ;)
 

jcandleattic

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I think the people who list the sopanified ingredients often do so in order to avoid having to list things like lard, NaOH, sodium hydroxide or the dreaded "lye" as an ingredient. Which begs the question, can you list the chemical compound "NaOH" in the ingredients instead of "sodium hydroxide" and still meet the regs? It sure would save space on the label, and seem less intimidating?
Some people might, yes, but not everyone - because once the soap is made there is no dreaded "lye" in it anymore. Just the saponofied oils. (Unless of course it's lye heavy and then that would be a problem)
Some applications require the INCI names to be listed. Such as B&B products, cosmetics and drugs. If there are claims made with soap, depending on the claim, the product is then no longer considered soap, but either a cosmetic or a drug, which do have to be labeled with the INCI ingredients.
 

thinnestslice

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Ok. Can anyone refer me to a good source for the INCI catalogue? I found one site but I had to know the ingredient's INCI name to search it. I need one where I can search by the "civilian" name of the ingredient to get the INCI name.
 

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