Cabbage Recipes?

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earlene

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Kimchi is a favorite of my eldest brother, a taste for which he obtained while serving in VietNam. My auntie's Kimchi is delicious, but because she uses fish sauce I haven't tasted it for 22 years. Now and again, I think to myself, I'll make some vegan Kimchi but for one reason or another, I rarely get around to making fermented vegetables. But this is making me hungry, I'll say that for your kimchi, @ResolvableOwl.
 

Becky1024

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UNSTUFFED CABBAGE ROLLS
Ingredients:
1 1/2 to 2 pounds lean ground beef
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
1 large onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
1 small cabbage, chopped
2 cans (14.5 ounces each) low sodium diced tomatoes
1 can (8 ounces) tomato sauce
1/2 cup water
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 teaspoon sea salt
Directions:
In a large skillet, heat olive oil over medium heat. Add the ground beef and onion and cook, stirring, until ground beef is no longer pink and onion is tender.
Add the garlic and continue cooking for 1 minute.
Add the chopped cabbage, tomatoes, tomato sauce, pepper, and salt. Bring to a boil. Cover and simmer for 20 to 30 minutes, or until cabbage is tender.
Yield: Serves 6 to 8.

I make this every winter. It’s good comfort food on a cold day! You can freeze the leftovers and it makes a quick meal later.
 
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A good way to use fresh cabbage is Chinese Chicken Salad!

Cut cabbage and carrots in fine strips
Add some chopped green onion and rotisserie chicken and sliced almonds. You can also add fresh or canned mandarins.

Take a ramen pack and crush it then gently brown it with butter and some of the seasoning pack on the stove

Mix 1/4 cup soy sauce with 1/4 unseasoned rice vinegar, 2 tbsp sugar and a few dashes of sesame oil

Mix all and enjoy!
 

DeeAnna

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I use broken up uncooked ramen noodles to add crunch to salads, and I suspect that's why Cat&Oak is using them in this recipe too. I try to add them at the last minute so the noodles stay crispy.
 
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Let's see if i can remember this recipe - I don't have an electronic version of it, it's all in my head. It's an Iranian inspired dish ( with a few adaptations). I'm also a fly-by-the-seat-of-my-pants cook so you'll notice i don't give precise amounts.
You'll need:
400 - 600g ground lamb (if you can't get his where you are just use ground beef, it's almost as nice)
a quarter to a half cabbage - shredded
2 cups basmati rice ( uncooked - and not that weird 'instant' or 'quick cook' stuff y'all use over in the USA)
Two or three tablespoons tomato paste ( sun-dried tomato paste even better if you can get it)
Lime juice ( fresh or bottled) - about two or three tablespoons
Spices: ground cumin 1/4 teaspoon, cinnamon 3/4 - 1 teaspoon, turmeric heaped teaspoon, salt - one generous teaspoon.
You will need a HUGE wok-sized frying pan. I use a circulon frying pan that almost looks like a wok, but it has a flat bottom on it.
Method:
Brown the meat in a little oil, and break it up into tiny grounds, then sprinkle over all the spices and stir though
Add the shredded cabbage and keep frying gently - stir through until it's wilted
Make a well in the centre and add the tomato paste and the lime juice, then blend it all through the meat and cabbage.
Lastly, add the rice to the pan and stir that through as well.
Then add four cups of BOILING water and stir it through the mixture ( make sure it is all at boiling temp), and pat down all the rice to make sure it is submerged in the water before putting on a tight fitting lid and turning the heat right down to the lowest possible setting.
I usually check after about 10-15 minutes and scrap up all the rice from the bottom of the pan and try to 'flip it' over so that the rice that is on top is now at the bottom. If it looks like it needs a little more water add another couple of tablespoons - or quarter cup as needed to adequately cook the rice. Cover again and let it keep absorbing for another five or ten minutes or so.
It's ok if it browns a little on the bottom - in fact in Iran they actively encourage it - it's a delicacy! It's also ok if it doesn't brown on the bottom too - but i would prefer it a little brown than too wet and sloppy. It should fluff up pretty well once cooked with no moisture evident.
MOST IMPORTANT - the dressing!!
Chop up a couple of cloves of fresh garlic very finely and add to half a cup of yoghurt and add a couple of tablespoons of mayonnaise, mix well. Maybe add a smidge of fresh parsley or similar for colour. Alternatively you can buy some ready-made tzatziki or similar and add some garlic to it. Garlic is good - whatever you do, it needs the garlic. At a pinch you could use aioli with a touch of plain yoghurt in it.
Serve in big bowls or on plates with lashings of the garlic dressing and a few drops of hot sauce ( like a tabasco or something).
If you are serving more than four people just add more of everything accordingly - but make sure your pan is big enough to cope with more rice.
Nom nom! Always a favourite in my house. Everyone that tries it wants the recipe.
 
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Let's see if i can remember this recipe - I don't have an electronic version of it, it's all in my head. It's an Iranian inspired dish ( with a few adaptations). I'm also a fly-by-the-seat-of-my-pants cook so you'll notice i don't give precise amounts.
You'll need:
400 - 600g ground lamb (if you can't get his where you are just use ground beef, it's almost as nice)
a quarter to a half cabbage - shredded
2 cups basmati rice ( uncooked - and not that weird 'instant' or 'quick cook' stuff y'all use over in the USA)
Two or three tablespoons tomato paste ( sun-dried tomato paste even better if you can get it)
Lime juice ( fresh or bottled) - about two or three tablespoons
Spices: ground cumin 1/4 teaspoon, cinnamon 3/4 - 1 teaspoon, turmeric heaped teaspoon, salt - one generous teaspoon.
You will need a HUGE wok-sized frying pan. I use a circulon frying pan that almost looks like a wok, but it has a flat bottom on it.
Method:
Brown the meat in a little oil, and break it up into tiny grounds, then sprinkle over all the spices and stir though
Add the shredded cabbage and keep frying gently - stir through until it's wilted
Make a well in the centre and add the tomato paste and the lime juice, then blend it all through the meat and cabbage.
Lastly, add the rice to the pan and stir that through as well.
Then add four cups of BOILING water and stir it through the mixture ( make sure it is all at boiling temp), and pat down all the rice to make sure it is submerged in the water before putting on a tight fitting lid and turning the heat right down to the lowest possible setting.
I usually check after about 10-15 minutes and scrap up all the rice from the bottom of the pan and try to 'flip it' over so that the rice that is on top is now at the bottom. If it looks like it needs a little more water add another couple of tablespoons - or quarter cup as needed to adequately cook the rice. Cover again and let it keep absorbing for another five or ten minutes or so.
It's ok if it browns a little on the bottom - in fact in Iran they actively encourage it - it's a delicacy! It's also ok if it doesn't brown on the bottom too - but i would prefer it a little brown than too wet and sloppy. It should fluff up pretty well once cooked with no moisture evident.
MOST IMPORTANT - the dressing!!
Chop up a couple of cloves of fresh garlic very finely and add to half a cup of yoghurt and add a couple of tablespoons of mayonnaise, mix well. Maybe add a smidge of fresh parsley or similar for colour. Alternatively you can buy some ready-made tzatziki or similar and add some garlic to it. Garlic is good - whatever you do, it needs the garlic. At a pinch you could use aioli with a touch of plain yoghurt in it.
Serve in big bowls or on plates with lashings of the garlic dressing and a few drops of hot sauce ( like a tabasco or something).
If you are serving more than four people just add more of everything accordingly - but make sure your pan is big enough to cope with more rice.
Nom nom! Always a favourite in my house. Everyone that tries it wants the recipe.

I can't help but feel a little insulted by that. 🤣 I rarely use basmati and am more likely to use parboiled/converted rice. I might have to try this.
 

Tara_H

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Let's see if i can remember this recipe - I don't have an electronic version of it, it's all in my head. It's an Iranian inspired dish ( with a few adaptations). I'm also a fly-by-the-seat-of-my-pants cook so you'll notice i don't give precise amounts.
You'll need:
400 - 600g ground lamb (if you can't get his where you are just use ground beef, it's almost as nice)
a quarter to a half cabbage - shredded
2 cups basmati rice ( uncooked - and not that weird 'instant' or 'quick cook' stuff y'all use over in the USA)
Two or three tablespoons tomato paste ( sun-dried tomato paste even better if you can get it)
Lime juice ( fresh or bottled) - about two or three tablespoons
Spices: ground cumin 1/4 teaspoon, cinnamon 3/4 - 1 teaspoon, turmeric heaped teaspoon, salt - one generous teaspoon.
You will need a HUGE wok-sized frying pan. I use a circulon frying pan that almost looks like a wok, but it has a flat bottom on it.
Method:
Brown the meat in a little oil, and break it up into tiny grounds, then sprinkle over all the spices and stir though
Add the shredded cabbage and keep frying gently - stir through until it's wilted
Make a well in the centre and add the tomato paste and the lime juice, then blend it all through the meat and cabbage.
Lastly, add the rice to the pan and stir that through as well.
Then add four cups of BOILING water and stir it through the mixture ( make sure it is all at boiling temp), and pat down all the rice to make sure it is submerged in the water before putting on a tight fitting lid and turning the heat right down to the lowest possible setting.
I usually check after about 10-15 minutes and scrap up all the rice from the bottom of the pan and try to 'flip it' over so that the rice that is on top is now at the bottom. If it looks like it needs a little more water add another couple of tablespoons - or quarter cup as needed to adequately cook the rice. Cover again and let it keep absorbing for another five or ten minutes or so.
It's ok if it browns a little on the bottom - in fact in Iran they actively encourage it - it's a delicacy! It's also ok if it doesn't brown on the bottom too - but i would prefer it a little brown than too wet and sloppy. It should fluff up pretty well once cooked with no moisture evident.
MOST IMPORTANT - the dressing!!
Chop up a couple of cloves of fresh garlic very finely and add to half a cup of yoghurt and add a couple of tablespoons of mayonnaise, mix well. Maybe add a smidge of fresh parsley or similar for colour. Alternatively you can buy some ready-made tzatziki or similar and add some garlic to it. Garlic is good - whatever you do, it needs the garlic. At a pinch you could use aioli with a touch of plain yoghurt in it.
Serve in big bowls or on plates with lashings of the garlic dressing and a few drops of hot sauce ( like a tabasco or something).
If you are serving more than four people just add more of everything accordingly - but make sure your pan is big enough to cope with more rice.
Nom nom! Always a favourite in my house. Everyone that tries it wants the recipe.
Oh, I'm going to have to remember to try this one! My best friend as a teenager was from Iran and she used to cook for us after school, something very similar to this! As I recall, stirring or interfering with the rice in any way was forbidden, but she would add a little butter near the end to encourage the brown crispy part 😋
 

earlene

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... not that weird 'instant' or 'quick cook' stuff y'all use over in the USA

I can't help but feel a little insulted by that. 🤣 I rarely use basmati and am more likely to use parboiled/converted rice. I might have to try this.

Me too, @Arimara, but I am sure @KiwiMoose meant no ill intent.

I never use quick cooking rice. I think my mom may have had some in the kitchen cupboard, but I don't really recall if she used it in anything. Her favorite rice dish was Spanish rice, and using quick cooking rice in that doesn't make sense since, in IMO, regular rice produces a better result in Spanish rice and is actually less expensive.

I use many different types of rice depending on my whim or what I am making. I used to often cook up a mix of long & shorter grained wild rice, both for its color variety and different texture when cooked, but it's become quite a bit more expensive over the years and also less available in the markets. I also like Forbidden rice and Red rice, and will pick that up when I can find them. In my cupboard right now, I have probably 5 or 6 different types of rice, none of it processed for quick cooking.
 
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Me too, @Arimara, but I am sure @KiwiMoose meant no ill intent.

I never use quick cooking rice. I think my mom may have had some in the kitchen cupboard, but I don't really recall if she used it in anything. Her favorite rice dish was Spanish rice, and using quick cooking rice in that doesn't make sense since, in IMO, regular rice produces a better result in Spanish rice and is actually less expensive.

I use many different types of rice depending on my whim or what I am making. I used to often cook up a mix of long & shorter grained wild rice, both for its color variety and different texture when cooked, but it's become quite a bit more expensive over the years and also less available in the markets. I also like Forbidden rice and Red rice, and will pick that up when I can find them. In my cupboard right now, I have probably 5 or 6 different types of rice, none of it processed for quick cooking.
When you say Spanish rice - you mean like a paella? Nom nom!
 

glendam

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In El Salvador we use cabbage to make “curtido”, similar to kimchee but not as spicy. I can ask my mom how to make it, However it is mostly used as a side dish For “Pupusas“, a cheesy stuffed tortilla. We also add it to chicken or beef soup, it softens and develops a nice flavor.
 
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First photo is without chicken on top, and second photo is with.
Amendments (in true kiwi moose fashion)
Used chicken thighs (skinless and boneless) and chicken ‘bacon’
Added some fresh mushrooms and some sour cream
Added fresh thyme
I didn’t cover to bake - but I think I was supposed to? It’s in the oven now so I had to remove my Rose soap I was CPOPping.
B688A445-5AF2-4941-B1A7-1BED4C7EB729.jpeg D3EDB335-9EF2-471F-82F1-DDCA5CDB7D19.jpeg
 

earlene

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When you say Spanish rice - you mean like a paella? Nom nom!
No it was more like this recipe, but not exactly. Mom usually took 2 or 3 recipes out of her circa 1940's big red cloth-covered cookbook and combined different aspects of them to create her/our favorites. I don't make it with ground beef, and Mom didn't always either, but it had lots of tomato, onion, bell pepper and spices for flavor. Other veggies vary based on availability. If my onion-hating brother (there was one) was eating, she'd leave out the onions, but it didn't taste as good without them.
 
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No it was more like this recipe, but not exactly. Mom usually took 2 or 3 recipes out of her circa 1940's big red cloth-covered cookbook and combined different aspects of them to create her/our favorites. I don't make it with ground beef, and Mom didn't always either, but it had lots of tomato, onion, bell pepper and spices for flavor. Other veggies vary based on availability. If my onion-hating brother (there was one) was eating, she'd leave out the onions, but it didn't taste as good without them.
Nothing tastes as good without the onions.
 

SPowers

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Cucumber & Cabbage Salad

    • 1/2 head white cabbage shredded or chopped
    • 2 persian cucumbers sliced
    • 2 tablespoons fresh dill chopped
    • 2 tablespoons green onions chopped
    • 2 teaspoon unrefined salt divided
    • 1/2 lemon, juiced
    • 3 tablespoons avocado or extra virgin olive oil
    • additional salt and pepper to taste
    • Finely shred or chop cabbage, discarding the cores (or composting). Season with 1 teaspoon of salt and mix thoroughly with hands pressing into the cabbage to help release natural juices. Set aside
    • Add chopped cucumbers, fresh dill and green onions.
    • Squeeze the juice of one lemon. Add additional salt and pepper to taste. Pour oil and combine well.
    • Store in the refrigerator for up to 4 days. See notes if wanting longer storage time.
Notes
    • To make this days in advance: shred cabbage and set aside. Cut the remaining fresh ingredients and keep separate from cabbage. When ready to serve, season cabbage with 1 teaspoon of salt and massage well to help release juices. Add remaining ingredients, including lemon juice and oil and combine well.
 

SPowers

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Caramelized Cabbage
    • 1 medium green cabbage (about 7” or 18cm diameter)
    • 1/4 cup olive oil
    • 2 Tbsp butter or more oil as needed
    • 1/4 cup dry white wine, stock, or water
    • 2 tsp pomegranate molasses (or 1 tsp balsamic vinegar)
    • Salt
    • Cut the cabbage into thin strips 2” (5cm) by 1/4” (1/2 cm).
    • Set a 12” stainless steel skillet with straight sides (or something similar) over high heat. Add the oil. When the oil is hot, add the cabbage, salt, and stir. Cook covered stirring occasionally until you develop a lot of browning. Once you are halfway there, start dropping the heat and checking the cabbage more frequently. This will take about 25 minutes. If the skillet is ever dry, add the butter or more oil.
    • Reduce the heat to low, add the wine, scrape up the brown bits and cook uncovered stirring occasionally until the cabbage starts to brown again, about 10 minutes. Take off heat, stir in pomegranate molasses, taste and adjust for salt. Can be made ahead and rewarmed. Will last in the fridge for 5 days.
Notes
    • Use bacon grease....after browning some bacon....add back the bacon at the end. Also add thinly slice onion and a couple of thinly sliced apples (golden delicious or granny smith). Better in cast iron. Plenty of cracked pepper and a teaspoon of brown sugar. Any vinegar is fine.
 
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