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Bigun

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I've gotten to the point where I can reliably make a large batch of pure lard soap without issues, spillage, or mistakes. I feel like I can move on to better recipes.

I've been using SoapCalc for my recipes, and I think a mix of 66.6% lard, 16.6% olive oil, and 16.6% coconut oil would be a lot better than just pure lard.

Does anyone have any tips or adjustments I could make to make a better soap? What about the procedure? Does that change, or will the soap react the same?
 

lenarenee

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That will make a fine bar of soap, gentle and long lasting. The 16% coconut will give you some big bubbles, and the olive will add some slickness to the bar and some shine to the bubbles. It's very similar to my go to recipe. I also use 5% castor, but it's not necessary.

ETA: Your process should be nearly identical to the 100% lard recipe. You shouldn't have any surprises.
 

Bigun

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That will make a fine bar of soap, gentle and long lasting. The 16% coconut will give you some big bubbles, and the olive will add some slickness to the bar and some shine to the bubbles. It's very similar to my go to recipe. I also use 5% castor, but it's not necessary.

ETA: Your process should be nearly identical to the 100% lard recipe. You shouldn't have any surprises.
Wow, castor oil seems to give the soap that little kick it needs to get over the edge. I may add that, thanks!
 

lenarenee

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You can - but it's not necessary, it does help support the bubbles. Experiment and see what you think.
 

shunt2011

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I too think your recipe looks good. I also use castor to help stabilize the bubbles.
 

newbie

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If you have castor, it's worth a small batch with and without to see what you think. I never make soap without it, personally. Even though the numbers may look amazing if you use >10%, high amounts can actually kill the lather. It helps stabilize the bubbles so 3-8% is a good number, plus high amounts can make your soap sticky.

You will have to post what you think of your 100% lard versus your next recipe, which I agree with lenaree looks just fine.

I forgot to add that the second recipe may trace a little faster than 100% lard but it won't be absurd. Just be aware and watchful but I'm sure you'll find it easy.

Oops, a bit of a cross post with Shunt!
 
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Bigun

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I've just made my first batch yesterday with the new formula, including castor oil. My wife fell in love, she washed the crock-pot basin out and demands I make more and to stop giving it away. My father in law washed his hands with the leftovers on the spoon and bought 6 bars about 30 minutes later. It's still curing but so far results seem promising.

Ok, wow this stuff is a lot more solid than the "just lard" formula. I usually wait 6 weeks for soap to cure to call it done, but this stuff after 24 hours feels a lot more done. Does it cure faster? How long do you guys cure for?
 

mx6inpenn

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Ok, wow this stuff is a lot more solid than the "just lard" formula. I usually wait 6 weeks for soap to cure to call it done, but this stuff after 24 hours feels a lot more done. Does it cure faster? How long do you guys cure for?
It may be harder sooner, but it is not cured. There is a difference between completely saponified and cured. If it doesn't zap anymore it is saponified. All cold and hot process soaps need at least a 4-6 week cure, preferably longer for most. I won't use soap before 6 weeks unless testing a new recipe, but usually wait 3 months since I have plenty and don't need to use new ones. I have a number that are more than a year old and they are sooooo much nicer.

Edited to add: I forgot to mention all of my recipes are high lard. You may think that soap is nice now, but wait til it has cured 3 months to really say wow!
 
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lenarenee

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Ok, wow this stuff is a lot more solid than the "just lard" formula. I usually wait 6 weeks for soap to cure to call it done, but this stuff after 24 hours feels a lot more done. Does it cure faster? How long do you guys cure for?

Technically no it doesn't cure any faster.

I use it as early as 3 weeks cured if I'm impatient for the particular scent I used in the batch. It doesn't leave my skin dry or tight, lathers well (we have soft water). I can't say that about the palm/olive recipes I used to make!

I notice very little difference in quality at weeks 4 and 5, but at two months cure it's a much nicer soap than 3 weeks.
 

Ivanstein

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Interesting to see this. I have wondered what pure lard soap is like. I just made a batch of 50% lard and 25% each olive and cocoanut oil.

I put a couple tablespoons of cinnamon and a tablespoon of cloves in the oil when it was melted. Then after medium trace, some pine needle oil. The hopes are that it makes a nice holiday scent to give away at Christmas.

I will be watching this thread to see how your recipe works after cure. I will try to post feedback on mine as well.
 

cherrycoke216

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I put a couple tablespoons of cinnamon and a tablespoon of cloves in the oil when it was melted. Then after medium trace, some pine needle oil. The hopes are that it makes a nice holiday scent to give away at Christmas.

Ground cinnamon and clove are not as potent as an EO, but it's still a irritant to the skin. Especially for someone with sensitive skin and neither regions. Hot hot hot as hell...

(Read that from here, there might be a recommended usage rate )
( though I have no experience with clove, and I use a sprinkle of cinnamon from the shaker bottle for soap. It's smell still shines through EO blend. And kind of overpowering at first. )
 
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Bigun

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Interesting to see this. I have wondered what pure lard soap is like....
Pure lard? You don't want it. It's honestly very lacking. It has a nice milky texture but that's about it. It takes a lot of work to make a lather, didn't seem to clean that well, very brittle and fell apart easy.
 
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kchaystack

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Pure lard? You don't want it. It's honestly very lacking. It has a nice milky texture but that's about it. It takes a lot of work to make a lather, didn't seem to clean that well, very brittle and fell apart easy.
( Dives for cover under a heavy table and cowers as Susie and the other Lardinators gear up for battle )
 

lenarenee

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Pure lard? You don't want it. It's honestly very lacking. It has a nice milky texture but that's about it. It takes a lot of work to make a lather, didn't seem to clean that well, very brittle and fell apart easy.
Now that is how I would describe an all tallow or high tallow soap (except for falling apart, not sure what you mean)
 

Bigun

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Now that is how I would describe an all tallow or high tallow soap (except for falling apart, not sure what you mean)
It seem when I use a bar of this stuff at the sink, it always winds up in pieces within a week or so. Unsure if it's due to the soap laying in a soap dish with water or what, but it always seems to fall apart.
 

Bigun

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All lard no, but high lard with other oils are excellent. I tried a small batch of just lard and found it lacking.
Agreed, the new batch I made is over 60% lard and it seems to be awesome from what little experience I've had yet. I'm having a hard time waiting for the curing period before cutting this stuff loose in the house.
 

Susie

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All lard no, but high lard with other oils are excellent. I tried a small batch of just lard and found it lacking.
^^This!

I don't like 100% lard. But 65% seems to be my sweet spot. And add the 15% CO for bubbles, the 15% OO for that indefinable (but very noticable!) quality it brings to the soap. Then Castor Oil 5% to stabilize the lather the 1 teaspoon-1 tablespoon of sugar PPO, and you have my perfect soap recipe.
 

lenarenee

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It seem when I use a bar of this stuff at the sink, it always winds up in pieces within a week or so. Unsure if it's due to the soap laying in a soap dish with water or what, but it always seems to fall apart.
I don't know either so I'm sorry I don't have any insights on that.

I am looking forward to hear your opinion on your 60% lard soap when it's cured :)
 

artemis

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It seem when I use a bar of this stuff at the sink, it always winds up in pieces within a week or so. Unsure if it's due to the soap laying in a soap dish with water or what, but it always seems to fall apart.
Handmade soap does not do well sitting in water. You need to find a soap dish that drains well, so thr soap has a chance to dry out. You can grab clear, plastic, nubby ones at the dollar store or Walmart, or there are all kinds of fancy ones at etsy.
 
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