Body Butter-Lid Condensation

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Hi all!

Just finished my first large production batch of body butter. They are packaged in short/fat PETE jars with lined lids. I waited until the butter had come to room temperature before placing the lids on, but still found condensation the next day. They are in a temperature-controlled room out of direct sunlight. I wiped the lids with rubbing to remove the condensation, but am worried that it will keep forming, especially after I deliver to my retail stores. So, what tactics do you employ to ensure no condensation forms on the lid? Should I turn them over and let the butter coat the lids??

Thanks!
 

coffeetime

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Where is the water coming from-the air, or is there water in your recipe? Sorry, that may seem like an odd question, but I've seen some things...
 

Seawolfe

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How sure are you that the contents equilibrated to room temp? Otherwise I got nutthin.
 
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Lol, coffeetime. I hear ya. Yes, traditional emulsified lotion recipe with water/aloe.

Seawolf-It is possible that it hadn't truly come to room temp when I placed lids (could have jumped the gun a bit since I was a bit worried about dust, etc.). If this is the case, now that the temp has normalized and the lids are cleaned of condensation, is it reasonable to a resume condensation should not be an issue again?
 

Seawolfe

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Lol, coffeetime. I hear ya. Yes, traditional emulsified lotion recipe with water/aloe.

Seawolf-It is possible that it hadn't truly come to room temp when I placed lids (could have jumped the gun a bit since I was a bit worried about dust, etc.). If this is the case, now that the temp has normalized and the lids are cleaned of condensation, is it reasonable to a resume condensation should not be an issue again?
I *think* so. I've stored things (like dehydrated items) that threw some condensate when I put them in jars before they were cool, and I see it all the time just with food I put in the fridge. Try it at see?
 

shunt2011

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As long as you have adequate preservative in your mix I think you should be okay. Going foward though, be sure your stuff is totally cooled before putting on lids.
 
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Thanks to everyone!

I just checked again and see some more condensation forming on the lids. I do have adequate preservative in the mix, but my understanding is that the condensation would not contain preservatives and therefore would allow for bacterial growth. Yes?

I just don't want this getting to my retail locations only to find that it spoils due to condensation...
 

The Efficacious Gentleman

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Ah yes - I read the original as being a body butter, which I always take as something with no water. As it is a thick lotion, which has the preservative, I think there are not going to be any issues.
 

Muskette

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The condensation will not form again as long as the jars aren't subjected to high heat. Remember, even if the surface temp of the product reads room temperature, the middle can still be warm. Just to be absolutely sure they are cool enough to put the lids on, leave them overnight or longer. I cover mine with paper towels or paper plates to keep out dust.
I had condensation on some jars of body cream after taking them to a farmers market. When I got home I wiped the condensation off, recapped, and put them in a closet. About a month later, I tested the cream and the condensation with a microbial test kit and it came out ok. I realize these kits aren't the same as professional lab testing, but my theory is that since the condensation is formed from already preserved water in the product, the condensation itself is also preserved. I could be way off on that, but my tests showed no bacterial or fungal growth.
 
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Thanks Muskette. I did have my formulation run through a common usage test so I am confident in my preservative level and I am testing each batch at home as well. My concern is if the condensation forms once it arrives at one of my retail locations since I certainly don't want them opening and closing the product to wipe it clean.

I do see some more condensation forming now, so I think I will wipe clean then use sterilized spoons to mix-up the butter (since it is uber-thick) and invert so that it covers the lids. To me, this would ensure the preserved mix coats all surfaces. Seem like a sound plan??
 

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