Blending EO’s - what flashpoint to use

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Hi all
I when using different essential oils in a candle recipe, what do you recommend when it comes to the flashpoint?

Example
If I wanted to mix Bergamot (125 degrees f) flashpoint and Cedarwood ( 200 degrees f) flashpoint, so you simply lost go with the lowest flashpoint or by blending the oils, does it amend the structure and therefore the flashpoint?

Using C3 soy wax so lowest pouring temp is 120 degrees f (according to manufacturer) so cutting it quite close with Bergamot?
Thanks in advance for any assistance guys
 

Nona'sFarm

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I remember asking that question of Candle Science. I can't remember why, but flashpoints don't matter for adding the scents to wax and they still recommended that one should add the scent to soy wax at 185 F for best scent retention.
I have never tried EOs in candles, only fragrance oils. Please let me know how well they perform.
Also, don't forget that soy candles need at least a 2 week cure time before they will give a decent hot throw.

I just found this which gives a better explanation.
"The flashpoint of candle fragrance oil is the temperature at which point it becomes combustible if exposed to a spark or flame. The flashpoint is generally only important for those making gel candles and for determining shipping methods. Certain gel waxes require fragrance oils with a flashpoint of 170° or higher. The flashpoint of candle fragrance oil can also determine whether or not it can be delivered via air mail or must be shipped via ground.

Despite some fragrance oils having lower flashpoints, they are safe to use in melted wax as long as they do not come in contact with an open flame or spark. Pouring fragrance oil with a flashpoint below 185° into wax that has been heated to around 185° will not cause it to ignite."
Source: theflamingcandle.com
 

DeeAnna

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Flash point temperatures don't really matter when deciding at what temp to add fragrance to wax (or soap batter or lotion or lip balm or etc.).

The reason is the flash point doesn't tell you anything about the rate at which a fragrance evaporates. High FP fragrances evaporate at about the same rate as low FP fragrances. That goes for EOs as well as FOs.

Flash point only tells you at what temperature the fragrance will burn when exposed to flame. If you're working with flammable materials, avoid using them near open flame or sparks to prevent a fire. The lower the FP temperature, the more critical this is.
 
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Thank you so much

I've been under the wrong impression this whole time when mixing my Eo's to my melted wax, Mainly because of this quote from a site "To develop the strongest scent in a candle, it is best to match the flash point of essential oil with the wax melt temperature or wax pour temperature. ... If the flash point of the essential oil is much lower than the wax temperature, there will be very little scent "
 

TennisGirl

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New to Soap Making yes that piece of misinformation about flash points is everywhere. It's the less dangerous cousin of the other horrible soaping myth about using vinegar to wash lye spills off your skin.

Over the years I have learned to research pretty thoroughly because anyone can post stuff on a website or blog. And some people are only motivated to make money or are naive about repeating what they've read from the person who wants to make money. Or they just misunderstand.

I only officially joined here recently myself but have been thankful for the solid scientifically correct information posted here that I have found over the years.
 
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I remember asking that question of Candle Science. I can't remember why, but flashpoints don't matter for adding the scents to wax and they still recommended that one should add the scent to soy wax at 185 F for best scent retention.
I have never tried EOs in candles, only fragrance oils. Please let me know how well they perform.
Also, don't forget that soy candles need at least a 2 week cure time before they will give a decent hot throw.

I just found this which gives a better explanation.
"The flashpoint of candle fragrance oil is the temperature at which point it becomes combustible if exposed to a spark or flame. The flashpoint is generally only important for those making gel candles and for determining shipping methods. Certain gel waxes require fragrance oils with a flashpoint of 170° or higher. The flashpoint of candle fragrance oil can also determine whether or not it can be delivered via air mail or must be shipped via ground.

Despite some fragrance oils having lower flashpoints, they are safe to use in melted wax as long as they do not come in contact with an open flame or spark. Pouring fragrance oil with a flashpoint below 185° into wax that has been heated to around 185° will not cause it to ignite."
Source: theflamingcandle.com
COLD THROW IS EPIC!!

mixed the essential oil at 170/175 ish

will let you know in 2 weeks or so how the hot throw is,
 
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Hot Throw was also Epic, Kind of surprised at how good it was really
Used 7% in the mix and everything is going the way it should ( good Melt pool and hot throw etc )
Thanks again for the help !
 

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