BeeswaxCandles

Discussion in 'Candle Making Forum' started by Guinevere, Sep 4, 2019.

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  1. Sep 4, 2019 #1

    Guinevere

    Guinevere

    Guinevere

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    Hello all, I have a question. I did look around for the answer already so I apologize in advance if I’ve skipped over it. In my small town we have a road side stand with a bunch of little goodies that I’m looking to “set up shoppe” there. I realize that the melting point of beeswax is between 145-147. I’m assuming that if I keep the candles out of direct sunlight they will be OK. I mean everyone has been having a heatwave this summer but no where close to 145.

    Guinevere

    :sadgoodbye: It’s hot!!!!!!

    :nodding: Yeah baby!!
     
  2. Nov 17, 2019 #2

    Nona'sFarm

    Nona'sFarm

    Nona'sFarm

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    I just recently joined SMF to learn more about soapmaking, however I have some experience with beeswax candles.

    They should be fine. I take mine to a local farmer's market all year, even in the summer. I live in central Virginia, which can have 100 F days, though more likely in the 90s. I have also left them in a hot car occasionally, with no problems. I've only had problems with soy candles and wax melts in the summer, never beeswax. So I only take the soy to the fall markets.
     
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  3. Dec 4, 2019 #3

    KJ Goodman

    KJ Goodman

    KJ Goodman

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    i have tried to make beeswax candles a few times now. The last batch of beeswax i received was very dark, but had a great smell. I got all the candles done, but they burn terrible. They seem to tunnel and the wicks get drowned out. ... any suggestions would be really appreciated. ---
     
  4. Dec 4, 2019 #4

    jcandleattic

    jcandleattic

    jcandleattic

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    Beeswax is an extremely hard wax, and needs a fairly large wick to burn properly. You probably are using a wick that is too small.
     
  5. Dec 5, 2019 at 12:20 AM #5

    Nona'sFarm

    Nona'sFarm

    Nona'sFarm

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    Finding the correct size wick is the most challenging part of candle making for me. One of my candles that I make has a fairly large diameter and even with the largest diameter wick that I could find it would tunnel and drown out. Finally in desperation, I mixed 1 part soy wax to 3 parts beeswax. It burned beautifully!
    Here is a link to how to do a burn test that I've referred to every time I want to try a new size or wax type.
    https://www.candlescience.com/learning/how-to-conduct-a-burn-test
     

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