Beer Soap?

Discussion in 'Beginners Soap Making Forum' started by Gryphonisle, Feb 2, 2020.

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  1. Feb 19, 2020 #61

    Arimara

    Arimara

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    Ok then. I know they have wine stores and I don't drink as much as I did when I was a little healthier.
     
  2. Feb 19, 2020 #62

    Mobjack Bay

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    When I make soap with beer, I reduced the volume by about 75%. I get some color, even from the lighter ales.
     
  3. Feb 19, 2020 #63

    IwantItgreen

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    When I make beer soap, I crack it open, let it set for awhile, stir it up a bit until the fizz is gone and then add my lye. I set the container in a ice bath to prevent overheating.
     
  4. Feb 20, 2020 #64

    Christine K

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    I ve been asked to make beer soap for a brewing company, and I've never done that before. I've got my recipe down pat, but would like to do something to make the soap look like it has bubbles in it...like a glass of beer. any suggestions of imbeds that I could use? Thanks a bunch!
     
  5. Feb 20, 2020 #65

    amd

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    @Christine K you might get more/better responses by starting your own thread. Those who know how to do this in general, may not be following this particular soap thread.

    But to answer your question... I would skip embeds, and just do a foamy layer.
     
  6. Feb 20, 2020 #66

    Zen Pretzel

    Zen Pretzel

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    I now have four kinds of beer soaps I've been making this past week. From left to right: Corona, Labatt Blue, Rickards Red and Guinness. I wanted to experiment with different types of beer from light to dark. Labatt Blue was my middle of the road beer soap. Strange thing with Labatt Blue: I boiled the alcohol off the beer before adding my lye to the liquid. All the other beers reacted the same way to lye as it does with water. When I added it to the Labatt Blue, it was a stronger reaction. It bubbled up, but not over and there was a brownish/yellow color in the foam. I'm thinking Labatt adds something to their beer that reacts funny with the lye. It has me thinking twice about drinking it.
     

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  7. Feb 21, 2020 #67

    amd

    amd

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    This seems like a typical response for beer that still has alcohol in it. The brownish/yellow color in the foam is likely some of the sugars burning off in the heat. How long did you boil for? What's the ABV for that beer? Also, did you allow the beer to cool before adding the lye? (I typically put mine in a closed container in the fridge for 24 hours before I make soap, so I'm adding my lye solution to cold beer.) Those things will make a difference in the lye reaction.

    That said, I believe that LaBatt is now owned by AB inBev, who are notorious for using corn syrup in beers. I do think the reaction that you saw is more due to alcohol rather than sugars.
     
  8. Feb 22, 2020 #68

    Zen Pretzel

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    That probably is what happened. I brought the beer to a full boil, but didn't give it enough time to cool off. The other times I gave it a few minutes and had no problems. I'll pay closer attention to this in the future. Thanks.

    For my next batch, I'm going to make a soap out of a beer lye mixture and hemp oil. I'm calling it "Drunk and Stoned". I'm positive this one will also sell out.
     
  9. Feb 22, 2020 #69

    math ace

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    I made my first beer soap tonight. I let it sit in the refrigerator for a couple of days. Then I froze it into ice cubes.

    Let me tell you what,. When the lye mixes with the beer, that is one nasty smell! I added the very slowly. I added a little lye and stirred the beer. The Frozen beer cubes melted and prevented any obnoxious over heating issues that I've read about. Then I added more lye and kept stirring.

    Stink... Lordy... I'm hoping that smell goes away during the cure!
     
  10. Feb 22, 2020 #70

    MarnieSoapien

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    My beer recipe has hemp oil in it as well. I call it Hemp & Hops. I haven't tried selling it but I think it's a good name.
     

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