Bathtub Lifts

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cmzaha

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Does anyone here have or had any experience with bathtubs lifts for the elderly? What a mess we are in, my mom in her stubborness decided to call a company to install a walk in tub at the cost of $22,500.00. Long story short these guys had her sign a contract with a 3 day option to change her mind. The next day they came in and smashed out all the gorgeous tile around her tub and broke through a wall. Mom did not inform me until after the fact. I find out these guys only have a general license that does not allow this type of work and are subcontracting in another company. Yep, the subcontracted company is a licensed expired landscape they owned. This saga will continue until we get help from the contractors board.

I have been researching these for a year now and do not consider them good for 90+ elders with dementia, so I am looking into tub lifts for her existing tub which we do not think they damaged. Anyone have any insight or experience with such. Thanks
 

Scooter

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Oh gosh I am so sorry you are having to go through this.
 

beardguy

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I do not know what the laws are where you are, but have you tried contacting a lawyer ? If your mom has dementia, it is possible she cannot enter a binding contract.
 

cmzaha

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I do not know what the laws are where you are, but have you tried contacting a lawyer ? If your mom has dementia, it is possible she cannot enter a binding contract.
That is true here too. I actually have the contractors Licensing Board working on an elder abuse case. I will have it all put back together and sue the SOB's. They will lose here. My dad is diagnosed with Alzheimer's but my mom was doing well until the last couple of months.

Neither are at the point I would even consider a home.They love their home and I am determined to make the home work for them
 

dibbles

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Carolyn, I don't know anything about bathtub lifts but I am so sorry you have to deal with this. I hope things are resolved quickly.
 

Seawolfe

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Ugh sorry you're going through this! What con artists! I would check out your local medical supplies company - they might have some to rent and be able to advise you on different types.
 

shunt2011

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Carolyn, I'm so sorry you are having to deal with this. There are certainly some scummy people out there that will take advantage of the elderly. Hope you get it straightened out soon. I agree with Seawolfe on checking with medical supply companies. They will be able to help I'm sure.
 

Susie

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Look up local "durable medical equipment" in Yellowpages.com. That will be who you need to talk to. You should also get your mom or dad's doctor to write an order for a bathtub lift. That way Medicare can cover part of the cost.

Have you thought about having the doctor order home health in to see them, at least for a short term? They can help get them some Occupational Therapy to help them get the house more accommodating for them.
 

BrewerGeorge

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...

Have you thought about having the doctor order home health in to see them, at least for a short term? They can help get them some Occupational Therapy to help them get the house more accommodating for them.
Medicare, and especially the VA if they have any entitlement, will provide in-home care as well.
 

DeeAnna

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Another gadget I've seen for handicapped access to tubs is a sliding seat. The seat is positioned over the floor, the person sits on the seat, the seat is slid sideways toward the tub, the person lifts her legs over the side of the tub while sitting on the seat, and the seat eventually slides over until it is entirely in the tub enclosure. There are swiveling versions too. Best explanation is a picture --

https://www.google.com/search?q=bat...tf-8&oe=utf-8#q=bathtub+sliding+seat&tbm=shop
 

cmzaha

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Another gadget I've seen for handicapped access to tubs is a sliding seat. The seat is positioned over the floor, the person sits on the seat, the seat is slid sideways toward the tub, the person lifts her legs over the side of the tub while sitting on the seat, and the seat eventually slides over until it is entirely in the tub enclosure. There are swiveling versions too. Best explanation is a picture --

https://www.google.com/search?q=bat...tf-8&oe=utf-8#q=bathtub+sliding+seat&tbm=shop
Problem is, mom wants to sit in the tub and she cannot get up. We are working on getting a door into her short tub. Let me warn anyone thinking of a walk in tub for elders such as my mom, they are not safe. The main problem is if a person falls inside the tub no one can enter the tub so an elderly person could virutally drown if the slip off or fall forward off the seat since another person cannot get in the door to lift them up. There are other issues besides that. So if anyone considers a walk in tub for an elderly family member with mobility issues please do your due diligence and research, research, research. As I mentioned to my mom in the ads they are not filming 90 year olds getting in and out.

What I have come up with is have a door conversion kit installed in her existing tub, with a lift seat inside the tub. This way she can walk in the door sit on the lift seat and lower herself into the tub, she can then raise herself back up and use an install hand rail to steady herselt and walk out. Unlike my mom seemed to think I have been putting a lot of thought into what would work for her and would not have destroyed her tile and wall.
 
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Susie

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Yep, that's why I steered her that way. And an OT will help them get equipment/knowledge on how to accommodate growing infirmities. But an OT can't be the primary reason home health is going. You need either PT or nurses going at least short term. The home health can't go long term unless their health is rapidly declining, but they can help in the short term.

But the first thing to do is contact the doctor about the orders.
 

DeeAnna

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"...Problem is, mom wants to sit in the tub and she cannot get up...."

Oh. Okay -- thanks for clarifying, Carolyn. I missed that point.
 

cmzaha

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Look up local "durable medical equipment" in Yellowpages.com. That will be who you need to talk to. You should also get your mom or dad's doctor to write an order for a bathtub lift. That way Medicare can cover part of the cost.

Have you thought about having the doctor order home health in to see them, at least for a short term? They can help get them some Occupational Therapy to help them get the house more accommodating for them.
Sorry I missed reading everything. We have already been through most of this and because my mom is still ambulatory Care More does not offer much other than shower chairs and walkers. Believe me when I tell you, where I live you risked being robbed blind with home health care. Her Care More does not offer in house care through them, it has to be from an outside company. Fortunetly my mom can afford to purchase what she needs rather than taking the time to try to get some coverage. Mom does not need health care just assistance with getting around safely
 

cmzaha

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This is what I am ending up with and really think it will work, even my hubby thinks so. We will find out. This is the lift I ordered but found it for less money https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00872ED6U/?tag=skimlinks_replacement-20

This is the tub conversion http://cleancutbath.com/. It is not exactly what I wanted but the installer did not recommend the kit with the door, so we are going with the lift out piece, which is not heavy and my father can help with it. Now to get the tile back together and grab railings in
 
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earlene

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I concur with the above advice re: doctor involvement and HH involvement. For more information about how well any of the devices work and any possible complications, I suggest visiting a medical equipment sales office inside an actual hospital or one such located near a hospital. We have visited both in our town when buying equipment for my MIL when she still lived at home. Both were very helpful when it came to deciding which device would work best for her particular needs. The doctor and HH services helped to ensure proper paperwork was done to ensure little or no out-of-pocket expense.

To re-iterate what BrewerGeorge said, the VA covered my FIL's Alzheimer's meds 100% and also covered a Home Health Aide to come into the home twice a week to help with personal care for as long as he was able to remain in his home. Active duty in a war zone is not a requirement for this coverage. So look into it if he doesn't already have this coverage. The VA also allowed for the HHA to do errands for my MIL, because she was considered his caregiver and she was also disabled and couldn't do the errands herself. Then she qualified for help herself under her own disability and state coverage criteria. So between the two of them, they were able to have someone come in 3 or 4 times per week, based on a total number of hours per week.

(ETA after reading two posts above. Sorry, maybe in furture it would help; maybe not.)


ETA: I see we cross posted.

That tub conversion looks very nice. So much more affordable than that scam those disreputable 'contractors' sold your mom. I'd be very interested in it for water tightness, if you wouldn't mind doing a follow-up some day in the future?

For my MIL, we hired a contractor in town whom my husband has known most of his life, to widen the bathroom door so she could fit through in her wheel chair. My husband installed the grab rails himself and also replaced the bathroom sink and cabinet so she could wheel up to the sink (leg room needed) because it's really pretty easy to do, but the door frame was more work than he had time for with a full time job.

I feel for you having to do all this repair work. Your mom probably feels really bad about the debacle. I hope she is holding up okay.
 
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