Bath Salt Losing Fragrance

Soapmaking Forum - Soap & Candle Forums

Help Support Soapmaking Forum - Soap & Candle Forums:

Sandyabegail

New Member
Joined
May 14, 2021
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Location
Philippines
Hi! I started making DIY bath salts. I noticed that the salts are losing its frangrance. I'm using EO for scents. My recipe is basically Epsom Salt and EO. Ratio is 1cup of salt = 10-15 drops of EO. I blend them well before baking, to dehydrate the salts and avoid clumping. I store the salts in test tubes with cork lids.

I have read about using Dendritic Salts, as they absorb fragrances and colors better. Unfortunately, Dendritic Salt is not available in our country. 😔 I'm thinking of adding more EO after baking, but I fear it might cause my salts to clump.

Would really appreciate if someone can help me sort this out. I'm planning to start up a small bath essentials business. Hoping i can get this right.
 

Anstarx

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 19, 2019
Messages
354
Reaction score
866
Location
Cloud Nine
Essential oils evaporate fast when being heated, which may be why your salt lose scent. Some are more delicate then another but overall baking/ dehydrate them means getting rid of all the EO you just put in, if the liquid you put in is EO, which kinda defeats the purpose.
If the salt's clumping heavily, maybe reduce the amount of EO, or use some very fine salt to absorb the EO and blend it with regular salt.
I would also suggest using weight instead of volume for measuring, so you get consistent result.
 

juveraeh99

New Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2021
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
Location
annaba
Probably not the primary benefit that epsom salts claim, but dissolving salts in water (or solutes into any solvent) makes the solution denser. So you're going to float slightly easier in an epsom salt batch than a normal one. Whether this makes any difference physiologically I 192.168.100.1 192.168.1.1 have no idea.
 
Last edited:

TheGecko

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 22, 2019
Messages
2,014
Reaction score
3,243
Location
Oregon
I store the salts in test tubes with cork lids.
It is probably the cork that is the culprit. Cork is not a solid material, it's porous...it's a wood, or rather it's the bark of a tree. Unlike the cork that is used in wine making, cork used for bath and body or decorative purposes isn't cut oversized and then compressed to create a tight, almost airtight seal...it is cut to fit the shape of the container so you don't need a cork screw to get it out.

One option would be to get a heat shrink band to cover around the opening and the cork. Another is to use a rubber stopper. And you could change your packaging completely...use those heat and seal mylar bags.
 

AliOop

Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Nov 15, 2018
Messages
5,097
Reaction score
8,668
Location
US
I was going to suggest not baking them, simply drying them, but I note you are in the Philippines, which is a very humid area of the world. Rather than drying, the Epsom salts laid out to dry would likely become wetter as they draw water from the air.

Other folks use baking soda and citric acid in their bath salts. You might look into adding those to your bath salts, and using them to anchor the EOs before adding that mix to the Epsom salts. Storage in a heat-and-seal bag, as @TheGecko suggested, is probably best.
 

lsg

Staff member
Admin
Moderator
Joined
Oct 14, 2007
Messages
14,979
Reaction score
6,304
You might try including some cosmetic clay as a scent anchor.
 

Latest posts

Top