Antibacterial soap question

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LauraZ

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I just started making soap and gave a few bars to my daughter and son-in-law who are both nurses. They are concerned about using it because it's not antibacterial. They wondered how clean my handmade soap will get them if they touch raw chicken or change their son's diaper. Do they have reason to be concerned?

I don't like using antibacterial soap and thought I saw an article that the chemicals in antibacterial soaps were being banned except for use in hospitals but I'm just a novice soap maker and not really sure what to say except to tell them I'll just make soap for the rest of the family and they can stick with the kind that makes them happy lol.
 

IrishLass

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Right here, silly!
Trust me, your handmade soap will clean your hands perfectly well, even after handling raw chicken and after changing dirty diapers. It does not need any added anti-bacterial ingredients in it at all. I have nurses in my family as well, and they try to stay away from using soaps and cleansers with 'anti-bacterial' ingredients in them. They are un-needed over-kill in handmade soap that can do more harm than good.

Hopefully our forum member Susie will chime in on this as she herself is a nurse.


IrishLass :)
 

Susie

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Have them read this:

http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm517478.htm

I am also a nurse, so I get the concern. We are trained from day 1 to understand that EVERYTHING is contaminated, and to KILL THOSE GERMS! However, those antibacterial soaps are part of the problem with our resistant bacteria, and are no more effective than regular soaps. All soaps are antibacterial, as proper handwashing removes the bacteria from our hands.

ETA: Posted same time as IrishLass, LOL.
 

Soapmaker145

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I just started making soap and gave a few bars to my daughter and son-in-law who are both nurses. They are concerned about using it because it's not antibacterial. They wondered how clean my handmade soap will get them if they touch raw chicken or change their son's diaper. Do they have reason to be concerned?

I don't like using antibacterial soap and thought I saw an article that the chemicals in antibacterial soaps were being banned except for use in hospitals but I'm just a novice soap maker and not really sure what to say except to tell them I'll just make soap for the rest of the family and they can stick with the kind that makes them happy lol.
Your soap is way better than antibacterial chemicals at cleaning up hands after chicken or diapers. I still use clorox to wash the sink after washing chicken (old habit) even though I know my liquid soap is good enough.

In a hospital setting, antibacterial soaps make sense as long as people know how to use them properly. In a home setting, antibacterial soaps create problems because they interfere with a natural environment that normally controls itself. The routine use of antibacterial chemicals kills more benign organisms and allows more harmful organisms to spread. It's the opposite of what you want and it is why they are not recommended for use in the home.

I see 2 other people beat me to the answer.
 

Susie

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Your soap is way better than antibacterial chemicals at cleaning up hands after chicken or diapers. I still use clorox to wash the sink after washing chicken (old habit) even though I know my liquid soap is good enough.
I still use Clorox and other antibacterial products to clean food preparation surfaces and the toilet. There is a difference in cleaning surfaces to kill bacteria and viruses vs washing hands. No one is arguing the need to use antiseptic products to kill germs on surfaces.

I see 2 other people beat me to the answer.
That does not mean you don't have valid input.
 

earlene

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Also a nurse (retired, but once a nurse, always a nurse)...

Also certified food handler trained by the heath department. (Owned and ran a restaurant after retiring from nursing).

Food handlers are not required to use anti-bacterial soap. They are required to wash their hands with soap and water, but plain soap is fine. Of course they do wear gloves, too. But even so, after using the rest room, plain soap and water is all that is required by the health department (again, referencing food handlers.)


I am really surprised to read about nurses who are concerned about using soap without added anti-bacterial ingredients as I would expect more current knowledge. But please don't say that to them, as it would sound condescending and hamper effective communication.

You could just say something like, 'Maybe I misunderstood this article on the subject. Could you look it over and maybe explain it to me in words I can understand?' (Show Susie's link.) No, maybe that sounds too weird. I don't know; you probably know better how to talk with them better than I as I don't know them.

Nota bene: Our infection control nurse always re-iterated the most important part of handwashing is friction. Warm water and soap, of course, but without friction the other two are useless.
 

Susie

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Warm water, soap, friction, and time. Folks need to wash for at least 20 seconds. That's two Happy Birthday songs for most of us.
 

navigator9

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Many people are afraid to let go of the idea that they need anti-bacterial soap to get their hands really clean. As Susie stated above, it's the running water, friction of rubbing the hands together with soap and doing it for long enough. That's really all you need. The experts have been advising against anti-bacterial soaps for some time now, but the FDA is just getting around to requiring some changes. http://qz.com/773202/fda-antibacterial-soap-ban-triclosan/
 

Susie

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Hopefully when this goes into effect, I can start washing my hands with the soap in public restrooms again. This is the very reason I had to create Soap2Go-allergy to Triclosan.
 

cmzaha

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Since our severe water shortage I use a lot of alcohol based rinse-free sanitizer, which I purchase from Essentialsbycatalina by the gallon. It not the cheapest sanitizer but it is a really nice one and you can get it pre-scented or plain to scent yourself
 

earlene

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Hopefully when this goes into effect, I can start washing my hands with the soap in public restrooms again. This is the very reason I had to create Soap2Go-allergy to Triclosan.
I actually couldn't even use the liquid soap my hospital first started using. In fact several staff had bad reactions to it. I also have a hard time with the LS in many public rest rooms. When foam soap started being used, I found it less harsh in the public rest rooms, but that's probably more to do with a smaller 'dose' of whatever ingredient is in it that bothers my skin and/or sense of smell. (Often it's the lingering smell that bothers me the most.)

Yes, I left out the length of time for effective hand washing, and here is why: In some US states the Health Department Hand Washing Posters say to wash for 15 seconds and some say for 30 seconds as well, not sure how old some of these posters are though. I tend to read them everywhere I go. I know the CDC (Center for Disease Control) currently reccomends 20 seconds based on a 'number of studies' and that is what's on a great number of posters I see around the US these days. But the WHO (World Health Organization) posters say the hand washing procedure takes approximately 45 to 60 seconds (from start to finish, including turning off the faucet), so although the 20 second friction method is not contradicted, it is also not included except for the alcohol-based hand cleaners. (Personally I don't like those either, but that's a different topic.)
 

navigator9

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I saw a piece on the news recently that kids who grow up with pets are healthier than those who don't, because they're exposed to more germs and have a chance to build up a stronger immune system. I have a friend who goes around with bleach wipes, wiping down everything in her house. There's such a thing as being too clean! People get brainwashed into thinking that they have to disinfect everything. Anti-bacterial soap just isn't necessary. Good handwashing, preferably with handmade soap, of course, gets the job done. http://www.webmd.com/parenting/baby/news/20120709/many-babies-healthier-in-homes-with-dogs#1
 
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LauraZ

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Thanks everyone for the information! I'll definitely share it with them. I'm really glad to see I have nothing to worry about with using my soap. My hands have gone from cracked and dry to soft and supple in the past 6 months since I began making soap and I wouldn't ever want a reason to have to go back. I'll tell them what I've learned here and they can make their own decisions. I don't want to force my soap on anyone or make them uncomfortable. Plus there are plenty of family members who are thrilled to enjoy the results of my hobby :)
 

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