Alternative to Sodium Lactate

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Sar

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I am in discussion with someone who is placing a wholesale order for alooot of soaps. They are starting a brand that deals in "fully natural" skincare products.
I have recently begun adding sodium lactate and sorbitol to all formulations. This client rejected both (after consulting with their dermat) because they are "not natural" and because "it completely defeats the purpose of being all natural" 😒 This is a large order and I'm concerned about any rancidity or DOS down the line. My formulations have all high linoleic oils under 15%. Would ROE do the trick?

And would salt work as an alternative to sodium lactate? I'd like to avoid a sticky stressful un-moulding process if I can help it!
 

lsg

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You might try using soy wax instead of sodium lactate.

 

DeeAnna

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Sodium lactate is not an effective chelator for soap or in fat. SL is typically used to increase the hardness of soap, as it sounds like you're aware.

ROE is an antioxidant not a chelator. It's an effective and proven antioxidant for use in soap and fats.

If you want a chelator, however, you need to look at sodium gluconate, sodium ETDA, sodium citrate, etc.
 

lsg

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I use soy wax a lot but, I never thought of it as a remedy for DOS or rancidty. Now I'm curious.

I use soy wax a lot but, I never thought of it as a remedy for DOS or rancidty. Now I'm curious.
I don't know if soy wax will prevent DOS. Adding a few drops of ROE helps to prevent rancidity.
 

Zany_in_CO

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I have recently begun adding sodium lactate and sorbitol to all formulations.
You don't need either. Sodium lactate for hardness and sorbitol for lather can be accomplished by adjusting the amount of coconut, PKO, or babassu oil in your recipe. Castor oil is conditioning and boosts lather at 5% max.
I'm concerned about any rancidity or DOS down the line.
I add ROE and vitamin E to almost all my batches and to my liquid oils @ 1% when they are first opened. I've never had a problem with rancidity or DOS but there are many reasons that could happen. Just do the research and take good notes.
My formulations have all high linoleic oils under 15%. ... I'd like to avoid a sticky stressful un-moulding process if I can help it!
If you've never made it, the Basic Trinity of Oils i.e. Coconut, Palm & Olive, are the ingredients often found in popular handcrafted soaps online like Dr. Squatsch. And it fits the bill perfectly without any of the above additions. Less is more! Try it. You'll like it. And I bet it will pass with flying colors.
And would salt work as an alternative to sodium lactate?
Salt is useful for hardening soaps high in Olive Oil or similar like ZNSC. That would be a good option for you too. Not only does it eliminate "slime" but it also has a quick cure rate and is "all natural".

I wouldn't recommend using salt with a balanced SAT/UNSAT formula like the Trinity of Oils. It's fine as is and doesn't need hardening.

GOOD LUCK!
 

earlene

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I'd definitely use ROE. Rosemary oleoresin extract should be considered natural by your client, I should think.

Sugar should not be a problem as a replacement for sorbitol, but if they don't want cane sugar, you can use something else, like 'raw sugar' or agave syrup or something like that which may be 'natural' friendly.

As for chelators, depending on the water where their customers live, you may or may not need to add one. They would probably reject EDTA, but I don't know about the other chelators. Citric Acid should also be considered natural though, I think because it is found naturally occuring in so many citrus fruits.

If you are keeping your formula, which I think it sounds like you want to do, and I think is best considering you are already in negotiations, then just subbing ROE (as the antioxidant to ward off DOS) and a chelator to reduce soap scum (or not) should be fine, plus plain table salt or a brine solution made with table salt to harden the soap & get it out of your molds faster is really all you need to do. If you like the added bubbles from sorbitol, use sugar instead.

Did they already try your soap and that is why you are working with this client? If they came to you because they like your soap, I would not change the formula, other than to add the ROE & use salt instead of SL and sugar instead of sorbitol. You would want to give them something as close to what they have already tried as possible, and that's how you can obtain that.
 

Sar

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Thank you, everyone! Appreciate all the input 🥰

I actually do add Sodium Gluconate to the batches that I sell under my brand. This being a custom order, I've been on the lookout for a 'natural' chelator.

I would have kept the formulas silly simple but the client had some specific oils that they wanted included, and some in specific percentages so working around that was a bit tricky. We did a large sample batch order and they tested it out and were happy with it and are now placing an order.

I think I'll definitely include ROE to the oils as soon as they arrive! Oh my. I should order it ASAP

I think i'll also season it with Brine solution and Sugar 😇
 
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