Additives in Liquid Soap

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finalfantasy

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Hello Soapers,

Long time lurker, first time caller. I've been searching the ends of the internet to answer this question about additives in liquid soap, specifically colloidal oatmeal.

I have a ton of colloidal oatmeal at my disposal, however, I'm not sure which part of the soaping process I would add the oatmeal to the soap. I would like to add it to my current paste in the dilution phase. I also have another soap I need to do this week, and I could add it to the oils/lye water phase. I just wanted to know where to add the oatmeal.

Also, it would be great if someone provide the same answer for honey as well.


At any rate, any information would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!
 

DeeAnna

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If you add a food source to liquid soap, especially during dilution, you are greatly increasing the odds of microbial growth. That covers both additives you mention. Also, additives that don't actually dissolve into solution have a good chance of settling out over time, which applies to the oatmeal. Some folks do add some honey, but the recommendation is to add it when you make the soap, absolutely not during dilution. Oatmeal ... I'm not so sure about using this at all in liquid soap, but maybe others will share their thoughts.
 
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IrishLass

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Welcome Finalfantasy! :wave:

I cannot speak to the oatmeal, as that is something I've never added to my liquid soap. To be honest, it's not something I'd personally ever add to my liquid soap because of the possible potential of it encouraging bacterial growth, not to mention that it would very likely sink to the bottom of my soap/not stay suspended. I highly suspect that that's probably why you are finding it hard to find an answer that addresses that question.

As for the honey- if it were me, I'd add it up front to the oil/water phase, instead of at dilution.


IrishLass :)
 

topofmurrayhill

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As for the honey- if it were me, I'd add it up front to the oil/water phase, instead of at dilution.
A nice thing about sugar in liquid soap is that you don't have to expose it to the lye. It can be added to the dilution water and brought to a boil if desired. I would boil it in the case of honey.

Sugar is one of the ingredients that makes transparent soap transparent. In liquid soap it improves clarity and lowers the cloud point. In either soap you add it after saponification.
 

ngian

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A nice thing about sugar in liquid soap is that you don't have to expose it to the lye. It can be added to the dilution water and brought to a boil if desired. I would boil it in the case of honey.

Sugar is one of the ingredients that makes transparent soap transparent. In liquid soap it improves clarity and lowers the cloud point. In either soap you add it after saponification.
When you say that "sugar lowers the cloud point", do you mean the cloudiness that is made because of the lye discount / superfat / lowering of the pH (< 8.5 pH)?

And does sugar makes the liquid soap more water soluble (bubblier) even when it is added at the dilution?

I know understand why the glycerin method LS might be more transparent than a non glycerin one.
 

Susie

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Cloud point is the temperature at which liquid soap turns cloudy. In climates that get cold, cloudy liquid soap is a frequent issue in the winter.

Sugar and honey do make liquid soap more bubbly.

Liquid glycerin soap is no more guaranteed to be clear than a non-glycerin one. It has to do more with the oils and the amount of superfat. Liquid glycerin soap is just an easier process, and much more skin friendly IMHO than a non-glycerin liquid soap.
 
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