Adding fragrance oil to cold process goat milk soaps?

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celticjanis

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I posted something about red clover tea to and got good response. Thanks. But, the post brought up another issue that I'm curious about. Everything I've read and heard is that you add the fragrance oil at trace. Why?
Shunt2011 and Penelopejane say they add the fragrance oil to the oils before adding the lye mixture (that is for goats milk soap cold process). Does anyone else do this? What are the pros and cons? Does it make any difference when you add the fragrance oil?
When do you add fo's and why?
I tried it today with my Symphony Scents red clover tea that I've always had problems with - softer soap and white blotches and excessive ash- and so far this batch looks great! We'll see as the soaps cure further.
Thanks. I'd love to get others' opinions and advice.
PS I also like it that when I add the fo first, the soap comes to trace much faster.
 

penelopejane

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Another advantage of that adding the FO with your oils (other than the fact that it will be evenly mixed in) is that you are less likely to forget it. Putting the FO bottle in the mold helps but it's often too late when you discover it after you've done swirls etc.

That applies to me anyway. You are much more experienced so probably have a better system. :)

When you reach trace or emulsion with the FO already in the mix you have more control because you can just gently hand stir colours from there and the perfect level of emulsion or trace doesn't get away from you.
 
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navigator9

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When you reach trace or emulsion with the FO already in the mix you have more control because you can just gently hand stir colours from there and the perfect level of emulsion or trace doesn't get away from you.
I always add my FOs to my oils before adding the lye, exactly for the reason above, in all of my cold process batches. There isn't any advantage to adding the FO at trace, that I know of.
 

Obsidian

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I often put my FO into my oils too, its especially helpful if I'm separating for multiple colors. I can't begin to guess how many times I separated, colored and started to pour only to have forgotten the FO. I just find it easier to put everything in with the oils.
 

SunWolf

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All of my soaps are made with only raw goat milk as my liquid. I freeze my milk and add my lye in stages, about a quarter of it at a time, while continuously stirring. My lye solution rarely gets above 75 to 80 degrees.

I heat my solid oils in the microwave, adding liquid oils after solids are melted. I add all my additives to my oils before I add my lye/milk solution. I can make sure everything is completely dispersed so I don't get any lumps from oatmeal or other additives. My oils are usually around 90 to 100 degrees.

I find that since I started putting my additives in my oils before adding lye, I have very few issues with acceleration of FO's or clumps of dry materials...something I had had issues with previously.
 

Susie

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If you add the FO to the oils, then if it misbehaves, you know about it as soon as you start stick blending, rather than being caught off guard after you get to trace, and expect to be able to color and swirl.
 

navigator9

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I find that since I started putting my additives in my oils before adding lye, I have very few issues with acceleration of FO's or clumps of dry materials...something I had had issues with previously.
Exactly. You can do all the mixing you need to, without worrying that the batter is getting thick, and you've still got lumps.....uh oh! This way, no worries.

If you add the FO to the oils, then if it misbehaves, you know about it as soon as you start stick blending, rather than being caught off guard after you get to trace, and expect to be able to color and swirl.
Yes, you can get the FO completely mixed in, and then when you add the lye solution, that's the point when I pay close attention. Sometimes, it all goes opaque really fast when the lye goes in. That's when I stir not blend with the SB, and watch closely. The speed at which things are moving, is one of those things that you get better at judging the more you do it. But by adding the FO to the oils first, and getting it mixed in, if things start to accelerate, you've got a better handle on it.
 

snappyllama

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I'm also a member of "getting everything into my oils before the lye solution" club. It makes it easy to ensure everything is mixed in thoroughly and that I don't accidentally forget something. It also seems to buy time with misbehaving FOs. If I'm planning on leaving a portion of my batter unscented, I put my FO inside my mold so I won't forget to add it in.

When I make HP, I also keep my superfat container in the mold. Or I'll forget it...
 

shunt2011

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Same here. It has simplified things greatly. Rarely have any of the issues I had when I first started. Over mixing then adding fragrance caused more problems than liked for sure. Much more control now.
 

navigator9

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I mostly put my FO in the oils just before I add the lye. I do this b/c once the lye water hits the oil, the clock is ticking! I like to have everything else possible set up so I can blend, separate, color, swirl, etc.
" once the lye water hits the oil, the clock is ticking!" That's a great way of explaining it. :thumbup:
 

cmzaha

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I usually add my fo after I have seperated the batter at very light emulsion. If using a fragrance for the first time and I am suspicious I will add it at very light emulsion, since I like to know my lye is oils is mixed before adding the fo in case is seizes. If all goes well I will separate some batter and mix my colors, if it looks like it will not behave I color the batter with a single color. You have to find which method you are comfortable with
 

TBandCW

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I'm waiting right now for my oils and lye to cool. I've always added fo at light trace, but I'm going to add it to my oils first this time and see what happens!
Ok, all went smooth and I'll be adding my fo to oils before lye from now on. I don't know if it made any difference as this fo behaves well, but it is one less thing to remember and as dixiedragon stated "the clock is ticking!"
 
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