4 year old palm oil?

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Someone has offered me some 4 year old food quality palm oil. Stored in their insulated garage so highest indoor temp in summer is 80 maybe 85. It was a 50 lb cube from a restaurant supplier, in plastic but not sealed. I'm thinking I don't want this for soap.....thoughts? Or would adding EDTA to my recipe help stave off rancidity?
We have new finicky garbage laws in California, and I can see why she wouldn't want to have to dispose of 20 lbs of fat! If there's a decent prospect at saving it, I'll do it.
 
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Whether I would eat it is debatable, but palm oil is incredibly shelf-stable at a pretty good range of temps. If it doesn't smell or look bad, I would definitely use it for soap, especially if it is hydrogenated palm (food grade PO from a restaurant supply usually is).

I'd melt it, add some ROE, stir it up really well, and portion it out into smaller containers to limit air exposure. Then make a small batch to see if you have any troubles. My only issue with using really old palm has been some stearic bits that were difficult to fully melt. If I had to do that again, I'd strain them out since they did create stearic spots in the soap. Nothing harmful, obviously - just annoying.

FWIW, I have always used CA or SC in my soap and have not developed DOS with any of my soaps that have included really old palm, CO, or PKO.
 
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Whether I would eat it is debatable, but palm oil is incredibly shelf-stable at a pretty good range of temps. If it doesn't smell or look bad, I would definitely use it for soap, especially if it is hydrogenated palm (food grade PO from a restaurant supply usually is).

I'd melt it, add some ROE, stir it up really well, and portion it out into smaller containers to limit air exposure. Then make a small batch to see if you have any troubles. My only issue with using really old palm has been some stearic bits that were difficult to fully melt. If I had to do that again, I'd strain them out since they did create stearic spots in the soap. Nothing harmful, obviously - just annoying.

FWIW, I have always used CA or SC in my soap and have not developed DOS with any of my soaps that have included really old palm, CO, or PKO.
LOL, did those happen to be my really old CO, Palm, and PKO... I have never had a problem with old plam other than also some small stearic spots, I am talking tiny dots.
 
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Whether I would eat it is debatable, but palm oil is incredibly shelf-stable at a pretty good range of temps. If it doesn't smell or look bad, I would definitely use it for soap, especially if it is hydrogenated palm (food grade PO from a restaurant supply usually is).

I'd melt it, add some ROE, stir it up really well, and portion it out into smaller containers to limit air exposure. Then make a small batch to see if you have any troubles. My only issue with using really old palm has been some stearic bits that were difficult to fully melt. If I had to do that again, I'd strain them out since they did create stearic spots in the soap. Nothing harmful, obviously - just annoying.

FWIW, I have always used CA or SC in my soap and have not developed DOS with any of my soaps that have included really old palm, CO, or PKO.

Ok, you have me convinced (it is hydrogenated, and contains citric acid and TBHQ or something like that). So I'll use it at 20 - 25 percent of a recipe, and I always use sodium citrate as a chelator anyway.
We can't throw any food or food waste (like used paper plates) away - it all goes into the green waste bin now. So...how the heck would she have thrown out 20ish pounds of palm oil!?
 

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